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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | main | brd2 | Kor | book member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, fun facts :::


36 11 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   Auld lang syne,       The last rose of summer,    The Minstrel Boy,     Scarborough Fair,    Loch Lomond

1.                    "Auld Lang Syne"  &  "God Save the Queen"

A)                   How (lyric of) "Auld Lang Syne" came into being.

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/auld+lang+syne

Auld Lang Syne

Should Old Acquaintance be forgot,
and never thought upon;
The flames of Love extinguished,
and fully past and gone:
Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold,
that loving Breast of thine;
That thou canst never once reflect
on Old long syne.

CHORUS:
On Old long syne my Jo,
in Old long syne,
That thou canst never once reflect,
on Old long syne.

My Heart is ravisht with delight,
when thee I think upon;
All Grief and Sorrow takes the flight,
and speedily is gone;
The bright resemblance of thy Face,
so fills this, Heart of mine;
That Force nor Fate can me displease,
for Old long syne.

CHORUS:
On Old long syne my Jo,
in Old long syne,
That thou canst never once reflect,
on Old long syne.


*    family {>> ("Auld Lang Syne" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "Should Old Acquaintance be forgot" /S/abE/+bp >> "and never thought upon" /GC/S/abE/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/S/abE/+cp)/mGC} >> "The flames of Love extinguished" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> "and fully past and gone" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp {>> (COLON /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp)/mGC} >> "Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold" /GC/P/abE/+bp >> "that loving Breast of thine" /GC/P/abE/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/P/abE/+cp)/S} >> "That thou canst never once reflect" /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> "on Old long syne" /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> "On Old long syne my Jo" /GC/S/abR/+bp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/+bp)/mGC} >> "in Old long syne" /GC/S/abR/+cp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/+cp)/mGC} >> "That thou canst never once reflect" /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp)/mGC} >> "on Old long syne" /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp)/mGC} >> "My Heart is ravisht with delight" /GC/P/abR/+bp >> "when thee I think upon" /GC/P/abR/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/S/abR/+bp)/S} >> "All Grief and Sorrow takes the flight" /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> "and speedily is gone" /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp)/S} >> "The bright resemblance of thy Face" /mGC/abE/+bp >> "so fills this, Heart of mine" /mGC/abE/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/P/abE/+cp)/S} >> "That Force nor Fate can me displease" /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> "for Old long syne" /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> "On Old long syne my Jo" /mGC/abR/+bp {>> (CHORUS /mGC/abR/+bp)/S} >> "in Old long syne" /mGC/abR/+cp {>> (CHORUS /mGC/abR/+cp)/S} >> "That thou canst never once reflect" /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp {>> (CHORUS /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp)/S} >> "on Old long syne" /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp {>> (CHORUS /mGC/abR/+cp)/S}

Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief,
when from thee I am gone;
will not thy presence yield relief,
to this sad Heart of mine:
Why doth thy presence me defeat,
with excellence divine?
Especially when I reflect
on Old long syne

CHORUS
On Old long syne my Jo,
in Old long syne,
That thou canst never once reflect,
on Old long syne.

(several further stanzas)


*    CHORUS >> "Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> "when from thee I am gone" /GC/S/abE/+cp {>> (SEMICOLON /GC/S/abE/+cp)/mGC} >> "will not thy presence yield relief" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> "to this sad Heart of mine" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp {>> (COLON /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp)/mGC} >> "Why doth thy presence me defeat" /GC/P/abE/+bp >> "with excellence divine" /GC/P/abE/+cp {>> ("QUESTION MARK" /GC/P/abE/+cp)/S} >> "Especially when I reflect" /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> "on Old long syne" /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> "On Old long syne my Jo" /GC/S/abR/+bp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/+bp)/mGC} >> "in Old long syne" /GC/S/abR/+cp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/+cp)/mGC} >> "That thou canst never once reflect" /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp)/mGC} >> "on Old long syne" /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp {>> (CHORUS /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp)/mGC} >> several /GC/P/abR/+bp >> further /GC/P/abR/+cp >> S /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> T /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> A /mGC/abE/+bp >> N /mGC/abE/+cp >> Z /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> A /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> S /mGC/abR/+bp >> BLANK /mGC/abR/+cp >> BLANK /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> BLANK /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp


Re: http://voicespec.com/board.cgi?id=test1&action=view&gul=1072&page=1&go_cnt=0

*                           ("auld lang syne" /uCh)/GC/S/abT  >>  friend

**               ("auld lang syne" /uCh + "auld lang syne" /SS)/GC/S/abT  >>  friend

*                 (friend/SS)/GC/S/abT  >>  "auld lang syne" (old rang sine [ol  d  ræŋ  za  in])

**                      (friend/SS + friend/uCh)/GC/S/abT  >>  "auld lang syne"      (가족)


*           "auld lang syne" (old rang sine [ol  d  ræŋ  za  in])  >>  family /mGC/abE/Ch


* friend/GC/S/abT >> "alter ego" /T >> buddy/P >> "close friend" /S >> familiar/C2 >> pal/GC/S/abT/Ch >> companion/T/Ch >> mate/P/Ch >> partner/S/Ch >> china/C2/Ch

*                                (friend/SS)/T  >>  "best friend"
*                                (friend/SS)/P  >>  intimate
*                                (friend/SS)/S  >>  cock
*                               (friend/SS)/C2  >>  comrade

*                           ("alter ego" /SS)/T  >>  "main man"
*                           ("alter ego" /SS)/P  >>  chum
*                           ("alter ego" /SS)/S  >>  confidant
*                          ("alter ego" /SS)/C2  >>  crony
*                   ("alter ego" /SS)/GC/S/abT  >>  confidante

*                               (buddy/SS)/T  >>  "soul mate"
*                               (buddy/SS)/P  >>  playmate
*                               (buddy/SS)/S  >>  homeboy
*                              (buddy/SS)/C2  >>  cobber
*                       (buddy/SS)/GC/S/abT  >>  "boon companion"

*                      (close/SS friend/uCh)/T  >>  supporter
*                      (close/SS friend/uCh)/P  >>  "bosom friend"
*                      (close/SS friend/uCh)/S  >>  associate
*                     (close/SS friend/uCh)/C2  >>  patron
*              (close/SS friend/uCh)/GC/S/abT  >>  advocate

*                                (familiar/SS)/T  >>  ally
*                                (familiar/SS)/P  >>  sponsor
*                                (familiar/SS)/S  >>  backer
*                               (familiar/SS)/C2  >>  partisan
*                        (familiar/SS)/GC/S/abT  >>  protagonist

*                                     (pal/SS)/T  >>  benefactor
*                                     (pal/SS)/P  >>  "well-wisher"
*                                     (pal/SS)/S  >>  Achates
*                                    (pal/SS)/C2  >>  adherent


http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/auld+lang+syne ,  
Auld Lang Syne
"Auld Lang Syne" (Scots pronunciation: [oːld l

aŋ s∂in]: note "s" rather than "z")[1] is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788[2][3] and set to the tune of a traditional folk song (Roud # 6294). It is well known in many English-speaking (and other) countries and is often sung to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight. By extension, its use has also become common at funerals, graduations, and as a farewell or ending to other occasions.

*    friend {>> ("Auld Lang Syne" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "QUOTATION MARK A" /S/abE/+bp >> U /GC/S/abE/+cp >> L /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> D /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> L /GC/P/abE/+bp >> A /GC/P/abE/+cp >> N /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> G /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> S /GC/S/abR/+bp >> Y /GC/S/abR/+cp >> N /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> E /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/P/abR/+bp >> COLON /GC/P/abR/+cp >> PARENTHESIS /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> Scots /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> pronunciation /mGC/abE/+bp >> COLON /mGC/abE/+cp >> BRACKET /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> O /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> COLON /mGC/abR/+bp >> L /mGC/abR/+cp >> D /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> L /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "Scots pronunciation" >> A /S/abE/+bp >> [eŋ] /GC/S/abE/+cp >> S /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> ∂ /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> I /GC/P/abE/+bp >> N /GC/P/abE/+cp >> BRACKET /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> COLON /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> note /GC/S/abR/+bp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/S/abR/+cp >> S /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> rather /GC/P/abR/+bp >> ~ ~ ~

*                                  eng [eŋ]  >>  agma /mGC/abE/Ch


The song's Scots title may be translated into English literally as "old long since", or more idiomatically, "long long ago",[4] "days gone by" or "old times". Consequently "For auld lang syne", as it appears in the first line of the chorus, is loosely translated as "for (the sake of) old times".

The phrase "Auld Lang Syne" is also used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570–1638), Allan Ramsay (1686–1757), and James Watson (1711) as well as older folk songs predating Burns.[5] Matthew Fitt uses the phrase "In the days of auld lang syne" as the equivalent of "Once upon a time..." in his retelling of fairy tales in the Scots language.

History
Robert Burns sent a copy of the original song to the Scots Musical Museum with the remark, “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man".[6] Some of the lyrics were indeed "collected" rather than composed by the poet; the ballad "Old Long Syne" printed in 1711 by James Watson shows considerable similarity in the first verse and the chorus to Burns' later poem,[5] and is almost certainly derived from the same "old song". It is a fair supposition to attribute the rest of the poem to Burns himself.[6]

*    "auld lang syne" {>> (History /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> Robert /S/abE/+bp >> Burns /GC/S/abE/+cp >> sent /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> ~ ~ ~


There is some doubt as to whether the melody used today is the same one Burns originally intended, but it is widely used in Scotland and in the rest of the world.[7][3]

In 1855, different words were written for the Auld Lang Syne tune by Albert Laighton and titled, "Song of the Old Folks." This song was included in the tunebook, Father Kemp's Old Folks Concert Tunes published in Boston, Massachusetts in 1860. [8]



B)               How (lyric of) "God Save the Queen" came into being.

Re: http://voicespec.com/board.cgi?id=test1&action=view&gul=1125&page=1&go_cnt=0

'God Save the Queen' (/T/Ch*) ------------------------------- 'Auld lang syne' /GC/S/abT/SS

1. God save our gracious Queen, ---------------------------- Should Old Acquaintance be forgot
Long live our noble Queen, ----------------------------------- and never thought upon
God save the Queen! ----------------------------------------- The flames of Love extinguished
Send her victorious, ------------------------------------------ and fully past and gone
Happy and glorious, ------------------------------------------ Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold
Long to reign over us; ---------------------------------------- that loving Breast of thine
God save the Queen! ----------------------------------------- That thou canst never once reflect
2. O Lord our God arise, -------------------------------------- on Old long syne
Scatter her enemies ------------------------------------------ On Old long syne my Jo
And make them fall; ------------------------------------------ in Old long syne
Confound their politics, --------------------------------------- That thou canst never once reflect
Frustrate their knavish tricks, (/P/Ch*) --------------------- on Old long syne
On Thee our hopes we fix, ----------------------------------- My Heart is ravisht with delight
God save us all! ----------------------------------------------- when thee I think upon
3. Thy choicest gifts in store --------------------------------- All Grief and Sorrow takes the flight
On her be pleased to pour; ---------------------------------- and speedily is gone
Long may she reign; ----------------------------------------- The bright resemblance of thy Face
May she defend our laws, ------------------------------------ so fills this, Heart of mine
And ever give us cause -------------------------------------- That Force nor Fate can me displease
To sing with heart and voice, -------------------------------- for Old long syne
God save the Queen! (/S/Ch*) ------------------------------ On Old long syne my Jo
4. Not in this land alone, ------------------------------------- in Old long syne
But be God's mercies known, -------------------------------- That thou canst never once reflect
From shore to shore! ----------------------------------------- on Old long syne
Lord make the nations see, --------------------------------- Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief
That men should brothers be, ------------------------------ when from thee I am gone
And form one family, ---------------------------------------- will not thy presence yield relief
The wide world over. ---------------------------------------- to this sad Heart of mine
5. From every latent foe, ----------------------------------- Why doth thy presence me defeat
From the assassins blow, ----------------------------------- with excellence divine
God save the Queen! --------------------------------------- Especially when I reflect
O'er her thine arm extend, --------------------------------- on Old long syne
For Britain's sake defend, (/C2/Ch*) ---------------------- On Old long syne my Jo
Our mother, prince, and friend, ----------------------------- in Old long syne
God save the Queen! --------------------------------------- That thou canst never once reflect
6. Lord grant that Marshal Wade --------------------------- on Old long syne

May by thy mighty aid -------------------------------------- several
Victory bring. ------------------------------------------------ further
May he sedition hush, -------------------------------------- S [e  s=]
And like a torrent rush, ------------------------------------- "T A" [ti  e  i]
Rebellious Scots to crush. ---------------------------------- "N Z" [en  zed  d=]
God save the King! ------------------------------------------ "A S" [e  i  e  s=]


http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/God+Save+the+Queen ,  
God Save the Queen
"God Save the Queen" (alternatively "God Save the King") is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth

 realms and British Crown Dependencies. It is the de facto national anthem of the United Kingdom and some of its territories; one of the two national anthems of New Zealand (since 1977) and those of Britain's territories that have their own additional local anthem; and the royal anthem of Australia (since 1984), Canada (since 1980[1]), Jamaica, and Tuvalu, as well as Gibraltar and the Isle of Man.[2] In countries not previously part of the British Empire, the tune of "God Save the Queen" has also been used as the basis for different patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. The authorship of the song is unknown, and beyond its first verse, which is consistent, it has many historic and extant versions: Since its first publication, different verses have been added and taken away and, even today, different publications include various selections of verses in various orders.[3] In general only one, or sometimes two verses are sung, but on rare occasions three.[4]

*    bottom {>> ("God Save the Queen" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "QUOTATION MARK God" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> Save /GC/S/abE/+cp >> the /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> Queen /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/P/abE/+bp >> PARENTHESIS /GC/P/abE/+cp >> alternatively /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> God /GC/S/abR/+bp >> Save /GC/S/abR/+cp >> the /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> King /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/P/abR/+bp >> PARENTHESIS /GC/P/abR/+cp >> is /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> an /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> anthem /mGC/abE/+bp >> used /mGC/abE/+cp >> in /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> a /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> number /mGC/abR/+bp >> of /mGC/abR/+cp >> Common /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> wealth /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "God Save the King" >> realms /GC/S/abE/+bp >> and /GC/S/abE/+cp >> British /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> Crown /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


The sovereign and his or her consort are saluted with the entire anthem, while other members of the royal family who are entitled to royal salute (such as the Prince of Wales) receive just the first six bars. The first six bars also form all or part of the Vice Regal Salute in some Commonwealth realms outside the UK (e.g., in Canada, governors general and lieutenant governors are at official events saluted with the first six bars of "God Save the Queen" followed by the first four and last four bars of "O Canada"), as well as the salute given to governors of British overseas territories. The words of the song, like its title, are adapted to the sex of the monarch, with "King" replacing "Queen", "he" replacing "she", and so forth, when a king reigns.

History
In The Oxford Companion to Music, Percy Scholes devotes about four pages to this subject,[5] pointing out the similarities to an early plainsong melody, although the rhythm is very distinctly that of a galliard, and he gives examples of several such dance tunes that bear a striking resemblance to "God Save the King/Queen". Scholes quotes a keyboard piece by Dr. John Bull (1619) which has some similarities to the modern tune, depending on the placing of accidentals which at that time were unwritten in certain cases and left to the discretion of the player (see musica ficta). He also points to several pieces by Henry Purcell, one of which includes the opening notes of the modern tune, set to the words "God Save The King". George Frideric Handel used the tune as theme in the variation piece 'Sarabande' of his Suite No.4 in E minor, HWV 429, composed prior to 1720.[6] Nineteenth century scholars and commentators mention the widespread belief that an old Scots carol, "Remember O Thou Man" was the source of the tune.[7][8]

*    "lowest part" {>> (History /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "In The Oxford Companion to Music, Percy S" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> C /GC/S/abE/+cp >> H /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> O /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> L /GC/P/abE/+bp >> E /GC/P/abE/+cp >> S /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> devotes /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> about /GC/S/abR/+bp >> ~ ~ ~



2.                THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/THE+LAST+ROSE+OF+SUMMER ,  

* (TIS/SS THE/uCh LAST/SS ROSE/uCh OF/SS SUMMER/uCh) /GC/S/abT  >>  "THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER"


'God Save the Queen' ------------------------------- 'Tis the last rose of summer" (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)

1. God save our gracious Queen, ------------------ Left blooming alone;
God save our gracious Queen, --------------------- SEMICOLON            (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)/mGC

Long live our noble Queen, ------------------------ All her lovely companions

God save the Queen! ------------------------------- Are faded and gone                (/C2/Ch*)
God save the Queen! ------------------------------- SEMICOLON                           (/C2*)

Send her victorious, -------------------------------- No flower of her kindred
Happy and glorious, --------------------------------- No rosebud is nigh
Long to reign over us; ------------------------------ To reflect back her blushes
God save the Queen! ------------------------------- To give sigh for sigh                (/S/Ch*)

2. O Lord our God arise, ---------------------------- I'll not leave thee, thou lone one
O Lord our God arise, ------------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK      (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)/P

Scatter her enemies -------------------------------- To pine on the stem
Scatter her enemies -------------------------------- SEMICOLON               (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)/P

And make them fall; -------------------------------- Since the lovely are sleeping
Confound their politics, ----------------------------- Go, sleep thou with them
Frustrate their knavish tricks, ---------------------- Thus kindly I scatter
On Thee our hopes we fix, ------------------------- Thy leaves o'er the bed
God save us all! ------------------------------------- Where thy mates of the garden
3. Thy choicest gifts in store  ---------------------- Lie scentless and dead
On her be pleased to pour; ------------------------- So soon may I follow
Long may she reign; -------------------------------- When friendships decay
May she defend our laws, -------------------------- From Love's shining circle
And ever give us cause ----------------------------- The gems drop away
To sing with heart and voice, ---------------------- When true hearts lie withered
God save the Queen! ------------------------------- And fond ones are flown              (/P/Ch*)
4. Not in this land alone, --------------------------- Oh! who would inhabit

But be God's mercies known, ---------------------- This bleak world alone
But be God's mercies known, ---------------------- QUESTION MARK           (/P/Ch*)/GC/S/abT

http://ingeb.org/songs/tisthela.html ,  
From shore to shore! ------------------------------ Letzte Rose, wie magst du

Lord make the nations see, ----------------------- so einsam hier blühn
Lord make the nations see, ----------------------- QUESTION MARK           (/P/Ch*)/GC/S/abT

That men should brothers be, -------------------- Deine freundlichen Schwestern
And form one family, ------------------------------ sind längst, schon längst dahin
The wide world over. ------------------------------ Keine Blüte haucht Balsam
5. From every latent foe, ------------------------- mit labendem Duft
From the assassins blow, ------------------------- Keine Blättchen mehr flattern
God save the Queen! ------------------------------ in stürmischer Luft                    (/T/Ch*)
O'er her thine arm extend, ------------------------ Warum blühst du so traurig

For Britain's sake defend, ------------------------- im Garten allein
For Britain's sake defend, ------------------------- QUESTION MARK                       (/T*)

Our mother, prince, and friend, ------------------ Sollst im Tod
God save the Queen! ----------------------------- mit den Schwestern                   (/C1/Ch*)
6. Lord grant that Marshal Wade ----------------- mit den Schwestern
May by thy mighty aid ---------------------------- vereinigt sein
Victory bring. -------------------------------------- Drum pflück ich, o Rose,
May he sedition hush, ----------------------------- vom Stamme dich ab
And like a torrent rush, --------------------------- Du sollst ruhen am Herzen
Rebellious Scots to crush. ------------------------ und mit mir im Grab
God save the King! ------------------------------- PERIOD


'Tis the last rose of summer

Left blooming alone;
All her lovely companions
Are faded and gone;
No flower of her kindred,
No rosebud is nigh,
To reflect back her blushes,
To give sigh for sigh.

I'll not leave thee, thou lone one!
To pine on the stem;
Since the lovely are sleeping,
Go, sleep thou with them.
Thus kindly I scatter,
Thy leaves o'er the bed,
Where thy mates of the garden
Lie scentless and dead.

So soon may I follow,
When friendships decay,
From Love's shining circle
The gems drop away.
When true hearts lie withered
And fond ones are flown,
Oh! who would inhabit,
This bleak world alone?

http://ingeb.org/songs/tisthela.html ,  
Letzte Rose, wie magst du
so einsam hier blühn?
Deine freundlichen Schwestern
sind längst, schon längst dahin.
Keine Blüte haucht Balsam
mit labendem Duft.
Keine Blättchen mehr flattern
in stürmischer Luft.

Warum blühst du so traurig
im Garten allein?
Sollst im Tod
mit den Schwestern,
mit den Schwestern
vereinigt sein.
Drum pflück ich, o Rose,
vom Stamme dich ab,
Du sollst ruhen am Herzen
und mit mir im Grab.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Rose_of_Summer ,  
The Last Rose of Summer
The Last Rose of Summer is a poem by Irish poet Thomas Moore, who was a friend of Byron and Shelley. Moore wrote it in 1

805 while at Jenkinstown Park in County Kilkenny, Ireland. Sir John Stevenson set the poem to its widely-known melody, and this was published in a collection of Moore's work called Irish Melodies (1807–34). In Ireland, it is claimed that the melody was composed by George Alexander Osborne, a composer from Limerick City.

*    bloom {>> ("The Last Rose of Summer" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "The Last Rose" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> of /GC/S/abE/+cp >> Summer /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> is /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> a /GC/P/abE/+bp >> poem /GC/P/abE/+cp >> by /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> Irish /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> poet /GC/S/abR/+bp >> Thomas /GC/S/abR/+cp >> Moore /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> who /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> was /GC/P/abR/+bp >> a /GC/P/abR/+cp >> friend /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> of /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> Byron /mGC/abE/+bp >> and /mGC/abE/+cp >> Shelley /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> Moore /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> wrote /mGC/abR/+bp >> it /mGC/abR/+cp >> in /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> 1/one /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "Last Rose" >> 8 /GC/S/abE/+bp >> zero /GC/S/abE/+cp >> 5 /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> while /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


Musical Settings
Beethoven composed a Theme and Three Variations for flute and piano, Op. 105, based on the song, late in his life. Mendelssohn composed a Fantasia in E major, Op. 15, based on the song (1827?, publ. London, 1830). Flotow uses the song in his opera "Martha", which premiered in 1847 in Vienna. It is a favorite air ("Letzte Rose") of the character Lady Harriet. The interpolation works, and indeed the song helped popularize the opera. (According to the 1954 Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, the opera grew from an 1844 ballet-pantomime, "Lady Henriette," for which Flotow wrote the music to Act One. Burgmuller and Deldevez wrote the rest of the music; "Lady Henriette" was produced in Paris.)

*    bud {>> ("Musical Settings" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> Beethoven /GC/S/abE/+bp >> composed /GC/S/abE/+cp >> a /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> Theme /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> and /GC/P/abE/+bp >> Three /GC/P/abE/+cp >> Variations /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> ~ ~ ~


It has been arranged into a set of extremely difficult variations by Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst for the violin.

The song is mentioned by James Joyce in Ulysses.[1] It is also mentioned by Wilkie Collins in The Moonstone.

Opera singer Luisa Tetrazzini began with the song in her free public concert in the streets of San Francisco, California on Christmas Eve, 1910.[2]

As well as being a common phrase,[citation needed] the poem is alluded to in the Grateful Dead song "Black Muddy River".

Clannad released a rendition of the song on their album Crann Úll. Sarah Brightman recorded the song for her album The Trees They Grow So High. It was made popular in the twenty-first century in a recording by Charlotte Church and the Irish Tenors.

It is sung in the musical group Celtic Woman by Méav Ní Mhaolchatha and Hayley Westenra. Chloë Agnew's solo version is recorded on her self-titled album. In the Celtic Woman: A New Journey tours, she sang duets with Ní Mhaolchatha, Westenra, and the vocalist-guitarist of the same group, Lynn Hilary. Agnew and Hilary are performing the same version in the Isle Of Hope tour. Ní Mhaolchatha's solo version is included in her Celtic Journey album.

In the 1941 film Here Comes Mr. Jordan it is the character Joe Pendelton’s inability to play “The Last Rose of Summer” on his saxophone anything other than badly which allows him to prove that he is alive in another man’s body; all the other characters think he is the dead man from whom he got the body, but when he plays the sax for his old boxing manager, he uses the same wrong note in the melody as he always did, and which thus confirms his story of coming back from the after-life. d into a set of extremely difficult variations by Heinrich Wilhelm Ernst for the violin.
~ ~ ~



3.                                The Minstrel Boy

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/The+Minstrel+Boy ,    


'God Save the Queen' ------------------------------- The Minstrel Boy                   (T-P)/Ch

1. God save our gracious Queen, ------------------ The minstrel boy to the war is gone

Long live our noble Queen, ------------------------ In the ranks of death ye will find him
Long live our noble Queen, ------------------------ SEMICOLON                             (T-P)

God save the Queen! ------------------------------- His father's sword he hath girded on  (T-S)/Ch

Send her victorious, -------------------------------- And his wild harp slung behind him;
Send her victorious, -------------------------------- SEMICOLON                             (T-S)

Happy and glorious, --------------------------------- "Land of Song!" said the warrior bard,
Long to reign over us; ------------------------------ "Tho' all the world betray thee,
God save the Queen! ---------------------- One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard,  (T-C2)/Ch

2. O Lord our God arise, ---------------------------- One faithful harp shall praise thee!"
O Lord our God arise, ------------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK                   (T-C2)

Scatter her enemies -------------------------------- The Minstrel fell! But the foeman's chain

And make them fall; -------------------------------- Could not bring his proud soul under;
And make them fall; -------------------------------- SEMICOLON                            (T-C2)

Confound their politics, ----------------------------- The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again,

Frustrate their knavish tricks, ---------------------- For he tore its chords asunder;
Frustrate their knavish tricks, ---------------------- SEMICOLON                            (T-C2)

On Thee our hopes we fix, ------------------------- And said "No chains shall sully thee,

God save us all! ------------------------------------- Thou soul of love and bravery!
God save us all! ------------------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK                   (T-C2)

3. Thy choicest gifts in store  ---------------------- Thy songs were made for the pure and free

On her be pleased to pour; ------------------------- They shall never sound in slavery!"
On her be pleased to pour; ------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK                   (T-C2)


Long may she reign; -------------------------------- The minstrel boy to the war is gone,

May she defend our laws, -------------------------- In the ranks of death ye may find him;
May she defend our laws, -------------------------- SEMICOLON                            (T-C2)

And ever give us cause ----------------------------- His father's sword he hath girded on,

To sing with heart and voice, ---------------------- With his wild harp slung along behind him;
To sing with heart and voice, ---------------------- SEMICOLON                            (T-C2)

God save the Queen! ---------------- Land of Song, the lays of the warrior bard,   (T-/GC/S/abT)/Ch
4. Not in this land alone, --------------------------- May some day sound for thee,
But be God's mercies known, ---------------------- But his harp belongs to the brave and free
From shore to shore! ------------------------------ And shall never sound in slavery!"


Lord make the nations see, ----------------------- The Minstrel Boy will return we pray
That men should brothers be, -------------------- When we hear the news we all will cheer it,
And form one family, ------------------------------ The minstrel boy will return one day,
The wide world over. ------------------------------ Torn perhaps in body, not in spirit.
5. From every latent foe, ------------------------- Then may he play on his harp in peace,
From the assassins blow, ------------------------- In a world such as heaven intended,
God save the Queen! -------------------------- For all the bitterness of man must cease,     (P-T)/Ch
O'er her thine arm extend, ------------------------ And ev'ry battle must be ended.


For Britain's --------------------------------------- Do thriall chun catha óg-laoch na rann,

sake defend, -------------------------------------- Lár námhad Éireann ársaighe;
sake defend, -------------------------------------- SEMICOLON                                 (P-T)

Our mother, --------------------------------------- Lann athar fáisgthe air go teann,
prince, and friend, -------------------------------- A n-aoinfheacht lé n-a chláirsigh
God save ------------------------------------------ "A Thír na n-Dán !" arsan an laoch-cheóil grinn,
the Queen! ---------------------------------------- "Dá m-beidheadh an saoghal dod' dhaoradh,
6. Lord grant -------------------------------------- Tá aon chruit amháin lé do mholadh go binn,
that Marshal Wade -------------------------------- 'S aon lann amháin lé do shaoradh !"
May by thy ---------------------------------------- Do thuit an bárd ach má thuit go fóill,
mighty aid ----------------------------------------- Bhidh a chroidhe neamh-eaglach, tréanmhar,
Victory bring. -------------------------------------- Is raob sé téada cláirsighe an cheóil,

May he --------------------------------------------- Do scuab sé an trá bhidh séanmhar;
May he --------------------------------------------- SEMICOLON                                 (P-T)

sedition hush, ------------------------------------- Is dubhairt: "ní mhillfidh cuing do ghuch

And like -------------------------------------------- A chruite chaoin na bh-fear saora !
And like -------------------------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK                        (P-T)

a torrent rush, ------------------------------------ Is ní cluinfear go h-eug do lán-bhinn sruth,

Rebellious Scots ---------------------------------- Lár bruide is bróin na tíre !"
Rebellious Scots ---------------------------------- EXCLAMATION MARK                        (P-T)

to crush. ------------------------------------------ Fillfidh an óg-laoch, tá súil againn
God save ----------------------------------------- Nuair cloisfear an scéal gáirfimid é.         (P-S)/Ch
the King! ----------------------------------------- Fillfidh an óg-laoch lá amháin,


For Britain's -------------------------------------- Stróicthe i gchorp ach ní sa spiorad é.     (C2-S)/Ch
sake defend, ------------------------------------- Ansin go seine sé a chruit go binn,
Our mother, -------------------------------------- I ndomhan ba ea rún Neamh é,
prince, and friend, ------------------------------- Mar caithfear searbhas daonna a chinn,
Our mother, -------------------------------------- Agus deireadh gach chath a dhéanamh.



The minstrel boy to the war is gone,
In the ranks of death ye will find him;
His father's sword he hath girded on,
And his wild harp slung behind him;
"Land of Song!" said the warrior bard,
"Tho' all the world betray thee,
One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard,
One faithful harp shall praise thee!"

The Minstrel fell! But the foeman's chain
Could not bring his proud soul under;
The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again,
For he tore its chords asunder;
And said "No chains shall sully thee,
Thou soul of love and bravery!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free
They shall never sound in slavery!"

A concentrated, single verse version exists:

The minstrel boy to the war is gone,
In the ranks of death ye may find him;
His father's sword he hath girded on,
With his wild harp slung along behind him;
Land of Song, the lays of the warrior bard,
May some day sound for thee,
But his harp belongs to the brave and free
And shall never sound in slavery!"

During the American Civil War a third verse was written by an unknown author, and is sometimes included in renditions of the song:

The Minstrel Boy will return we pray
When we hear the news we all will cheer it,
The minstrel boy will return one day,
Torn perhaps in body, not in spirit.
Then may he play on his harp in peace,
In a world such as heaven intended,
For all the bitterness of man must cease,
And ev'ry battle must be ended.

http://www.irishpage.com/songs/minstrel.htm ,  
Do thriall chun catha óg-laoch na rann,
Lár námhad Éireann ársaighe;
Lann athar fáisgthe air go teann,
A n-aoinfheacht lé n-a chláirsigh

"A Thír na n-Dán !" arsan an laoch-cheóil grinn,
"Dá m-beidheadh an saoghal dod' dhaoradh,
Tá aon chruit amháin lé do mholadh go binn,
'S aon lann amháin lé do shaoradh !"

Do thuit an bárd ach má thuit go fóill,
Bhidh a chroidhe neamh-eaglach, tréanmhar,
Is raob sé téada cláirsighe an cheóil,
Do scuab sé an trá bhidh séanmhar;

Is dubhairt: "ní mhillfidh cuing do ghuch
A chruite chaoin na bh-fear saora !
Is ní cluinfear go h-eug do lán-bhinn sruth,
Lár bruide is bróin na tíre !"


Fillfidh an óg-laoch, tá súil againn
Nuair cloisfear an scéal gáirfimid é.
Fillfidh an óg-laoch lá amháin,
Stróicthe i gchorp ach ní sa spiorad é.

Ansin go seine sé a chruit go binn,
I ndomhan ba ea rún Neamh é,
Mar caithfear searbhas daonna a chinn,
Agus deireadh gach chath a dhéanamh.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Minstrel_Boy ,  
The Minstrel Boy
"The Minstrel Boy" is an Irish patriotic song written by Thomas Moore (1779–1852)

 who set it to the melody of The Moreen, an old Irish air. It is widely believed that Moore composed the song in remembrance of a number of his friends, whom he met while studying at Trinity College, Dublin and who had participated in (and were killed during) the Irish Rebellion of 1798.

*    chaos {>> ("The Minstrel Boy" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "QUOTATION MARK The" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> Minstrel /GC/S/abE/+cp >> Boy /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> is /GC/P/abE/+bp >> an /GC/P/abE/+cp >> Irish /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> patriotic /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> song /GC/S/abR/+bp >> written /GC/S/abR/+cp >> by /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> Thomas /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> Moore /GC/P/abR/+bp >> PARENTHESIS /GC/P/abR/+cp >> 1 /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> 7 /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> 7 /mGC/abE/+bp >> 9 /mGC/abE/+cp >> DASH /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> 1 /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> 8 /mGC/abR/+bp >> 5 /mGC/abR/+cp >> 2 /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> PARENTHESIS /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "Minstrel Boy" >> who /GC/S/abE/+bp >> set /GC/S/abE/+cp >> it /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> to /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


The song gained widespread popularity and became a favourite of many Irishmen who fought during the United States Civil War and gained even more popularity after World War I. The song is notably associated with organizations that historically had a heavy representation of Irish-Americans, in particular the police and fire departments of New York, Boston and Chicago and those of various other major US metropolitan areas, even after those organizations have ceased to have a substantial over-representation of personnel of Irish ancestry. The melody is frequently played at funerals of members and/or officers of such organizations who have died or been killed in service, typically on bagpipes. Unsurprisingly, given its lyrics, it is also associated with the Irish Army and with traditionally Irish regiments in the British, United States and other armies.

Lyrics
The original lyrics are as follows:

The minstrel boy to the war is gone,
In the ranks of death you'll find him;
His father's sword he has girded on,
And his wild harp slung behind him;
"Land of Song!" said the warrior bard,
"Though all the world betrays thee,
One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard,
One faithful harp shall praise thee!"

*    disorder {>> (Lyrics /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "The original lyrics are as follows COLON" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> The /GC/S/abE/+cp >> minstrel /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> boy /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> to /GC/P/abE/+bp >> ~ ~ ~


The Minstrel fell! But the foeman's chain
Could not bring his proud soul under;
The harp he loved ne'er spoke again,
For he tore its chords asunder;
And said "No chains shall sully thee,
Thou soul of love and bravery!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free
They shall never sound in slavery!"

A concentrated, single verse version exists:

The minstrel boy to the war is gone,
In the ranks of death ye may find him;
His father's sword he hath girded on,
With his wild harp slung along behind him;
Land of Song, the lays of the warrior bard,
May some day sound for thee,
But his harp belongs to the brave and free
And shall never sound in slavery!"

During the American Civil War a third verse was written by an unknown author, and is sometimes included in renditions of the song:

The Minstrel Boy will return we pray
When we hear the news we all will cheer it,
The minstrel boy will return one day,
Torn perhaps in body, not in spirit.
Then may he play on his harp in peace,
In a world such as heaven intended,
For all the bitterness of man must cease,
And ev'ry battle must be ended.



4.                       Scarborough Fair

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough_Fair_(ballad) ,  
'Auld lang syne' /GC/S/abT/SS ---------------------------- Scarborough Fair               (/P/Ch*)

Should Old Acquaintance be forgot ------------------ Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Should Old Acquaintance be forgot ------------------ QUESTION MARK                        (/P*)

and never thought upon ------------------------------ Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,
The flames of Love extinguished --------------------- Remember me to one who lives there,
and fully past and gone ------------------------------- For once she was a true lover of mine.
Is thy sweet Heart now grown so cold --------------- Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,

that loving Breast of thine ---------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
that loving Breast of thine ---------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/P*)

That thou canst never once reflect ------------------- Without a seam or needlework,
on Old long syne --------------------------------- Then she shall be a true lover of mine.    (/T/Ch*)
On Old long syne my Jo ------------------------------ Tell her to wash it in yonder well,

in Old long syne --------------------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
in Old long syne --------------------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/T*)

That thou canst never once reflect ------------------- Where never spring water or rain ever fell,
on Old long syne --------------------------------- Ans she shall be a true lover of mine.      (/S/Ch*)
My Heart is ravisht with delight ---------------------- Tell her to dry it on yonder thorn,

when thee I think upon ------------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
when thee I think upon ------------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/S*)

All Grief and Sorrow takes the flight ----------------- Which never bore blossom since Adam was born,
and speedily is gone ---------------------------------- Then she shall be a true lover of mine.
The bright resemblance of thy Face ------------------ Now he has asked me questions three,

so fills this, Heart of mine ----------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
so fills this, Heart of mine ----------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/S*)

That Force nor Fate can me displease ----------------- I hope he'll answer as many for me
for Old long syne --------------------------------------- Before he shall be a true lover of mine.
On Old long syne my Jo -------------------------------- Tell him to buy me an acre of land,

in Old long syne --------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;     (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)
in Old long syne --------------------------------------- SEMICOLON                      (/GC/S/abT*)

That thou canst never once reflect ------------------- Betwixt the salt water and the sea sand,
on Old long syne -------------------------------------- Then he shall be a true lover of mine.
Since thoughts of thee doth banish grief ------------ Tell him to plough it with a ram's horn,

when from thee I am gone --------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;       (/C1/Ch*)
when from thee I am gone --------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/C1*)

will not thy presence yield relief --------------------- And sow it all over with one pepper corn,
to this sad Heart of mine ----------------------------- And he shall be a true lover of mine.
Why doth thy presence me defeat ------------------- Tell him to sheer't with a sickle of leather,

with excellence divine ------------------------ Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;         (/C2/Ch*)
with excellence divine -------------------------------- SEMICOLON                              (/C2*)

Especially when I reflect ------------------------------ And bind it up with a peacock feather.
on Old long syne -------------------------------------- And he shall be a true lover of mine.
On Old long syne my Jo ------------------------------ Tell him to thrash it on yonder wall,
in Old long syne --------------------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme,
That thou canst never once reflect ------------------ And never let one corn of it fall,
on Old long syne --------------------------- Then he shall be a true lover of mine.   (/GC/S/abT/Ch*)
several -------------------------------------- When he has done and finished his work.        (/T/Ch*)
further ------------------------------------------------- Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme:
"S T A N" ---------------------------------------------- Oh, tell him to come and he'll have his shirt,
"Z A S" ------------------------------------------------ And he shall be a true lover of mine.

Alternate refrains
The oldest versions of "The Elfin Knight" (circa 1650) contain the refrain "my plaid away, my plaid away, the wind shall not blow my plaid away". Slightly younger versions often contain one of a group of related refrains:
• Sober and grave grows merry in time
• Every rose grows merry with time
• There's never a rose grows fairer with time
These are usually paired with "Once (s)he was a true love of mine" or some variant. "Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" may simply be an alternate rhyming refrain to the original.

*  "Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme" >> "Sober and grave grows merry in time" /mGC/abE >> "Every rose grows merry with time" /mGC/abE/Ch

** "Every rose grows merry with time" /mGC/abE  >>  "There's never a rose grows fairer with time" /P


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough_Fair_(ballad) ,  
Scarborough Fair (ballad)
"Scarborough Fair" is a traditional ballad of Great Britain and more precisely Yorkshire.

The song relates the tale of a young man

 who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.

*    rhythm {>> (ballad /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "QUOTATION MARK Scarborough" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> Fair /GC/S/abE/+cp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> is /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> a /GC/P/abE/+bp >> traditional /GC/P/abE/+cp >> ballad /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> of /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> Great /GC/S/abR/+bp >> Britain /GC/S/abR/+cp >> and /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> more /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> precisely /GC/P/abR/+bp >> York /GC/P/abR/+cp >> shire /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> The /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> song /mGC/abE/+bp >> relates /mGC/abE/+cp >> the /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> tale /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> of /mGC/abR/+bp >> a /mGC/abR/+cp >> young /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> man /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "traditional ballad" >> who /GC/S/abE/+bp >> instructs /GC/S/abE/+cp >> the /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> listener /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


As the versions of the ballad known under the title "Scarborough Fair" are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the hypothesis that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight (Child Ballad #2),[1] which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task ("For thou must shape a sark to me / Without any cut or heme, quoth he"); she responds with a list of tasks that he must first perform ("I have an aiker of good ley-land / Which lyeth low by yon sea-strand").

The melody is very typical of the middle English period.

As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions, and the refrain may have been borrowed from the ballad Riddles Wisely Expounded, (Child Ballad #1), which has a similar plot. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc. Many versions do not mention a place-name, and are often generically titled ("The Lovers' Tasks", "My Father Gave Me an Acre of Land", etc.).


Lyrics
As a popular and widely-distributed song, there are many versions of the lyrics. A version published in 1889[2] is typical of modern versions, aside from the place-name:

*    swing {>> (Lyrics /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "As a popular and widely DASH" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> distributed /GC/S/abE/+cp >> song /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> there /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> are /GC/P/abE/+bp >> many /GC/P/abE/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
Remember me to one who lives there,
For once she was a true lover of mine.
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;
Without a seam or needlework,
Then she shall be a true lover of mine.



5.                               Loch Lomond

*                      "Loch Lomond"  >>  "The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond" /mGC/abE/Ch

Scarborough Fair     (/P/Ch*) ------------------------------ Loch Lomond                 (/S*)

Are you going to Scarborough Fair? ----------------------- By yon bonnie banks and by yon bonnie braes
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond

Remember me to one who lives there, ------------------- Where me and my true love will ne-er meet again
Remember me to one who lives there, -------- Where me and my true love were ever lak/wont to gae (/GC/S/abT*)

For once she was a true lover of mine. ------------------- On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.

Tell her to make me a cambric shirt, ----------- O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road    (/T*)
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt, ---------------------- Chorus                          (/T/Ch)

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- Chorus                          (/T/Ch)

Without a seam or needlework, --------------------------- For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
Without a seam or needlework, --------------------------- Chorus                          (/T/Ch)

Then she shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------- On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.
Then she shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------- Chorus                          (/T/Ch)

Tell her to wash it in yonder well, ------------------- ‘Twas there that we parted in yon shady glen       (/C2*)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- On the steep, steep sides o’ Ben Lomon'
Where never spring water or rain ever fell, --------------- Where in purple hue, the hielan hills we view
Ans she shall be a true lover of mine. --------------------- And the moon comin’ out in the gloamin’.

Tell her to dry it on yonder thorn, ------------------------- O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
Tell her to dry it on yonder thorn, ------------------------- Chorus                         (/C2/Ch)

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; ------------------ And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye         (/GC/S/abT*)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- Chorus                    (/GC/S/abT/Ch)

Which never bore blossom since Adam was born, -------- For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
Which never bore blossom since Adam was born, -------- Chorus                    (/GC/S/abT/Ch)

Then she shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------- On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.
Then she shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------- Chorus                    (/GC/S/abT/Ch)

Now he has asked me questions three, -------------- The wee birdies sing and the wild flowers spring      (/C1*)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- And in sunshine the waters are sleeping
I hope he'll answer as many for me ------------------ But the broken heart, it kens nae second spring again

Before he shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------ Tho’ the waeful may cease frae their greetin'.
Before he shall be a true lover of mine. ---------------- Tho' the world knows not how we are grieving (/C1/Ch)

Tell him to buy me an acre of land, --------------------- O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
Tell him to buy me an acre of land, ------------------------ Chorus                          (/C1/Ch)

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; ------------------------ And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; ---------------------- Chorus                          (/C1/Ch)

Betwixt the salt water and the sea sand, --------------- For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
Betwixt the salt water and the sea sand, ----------------- Chorus                          (/C1/Ch)

Then he shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------ On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.
Then he shall be a true lover of mine. -------------------- Chorus                          (/C1/Ch)

http://www.metrolyrics.com/loch-lomond-lyrics-the-corries.html
Tell him to plough it with a ram's horn, ------------------- As dauntless in battle      (/mGC/abE/Ch)
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; --------------------- as tender in love
And sow it all over with one pepper corn, ---------------- He'd yield ne'er
And he shall be a true lover of mine. --------------------- a foor toe the foeman
Tell him to sheer't with a sickle of leather, --------------- But never again frae
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme; -------------------- the field o' the slain         (/mGC/abR/Ch)
And bind it up with a peacock feather. ------------------- Tae his Moira
And he shall be a true lover of mine. -------------------- will he come by Loch Lomond
Tell him to thrash it on yonder wall, --------------------- The thistle may bloom
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme, -------------------- the King hae his ain         (/mGC/abT/Ch)
And never let one corn of it fall, ------------------------- And fond lovers
Then he shall be a true lover of mine. ------------------- may meet in the gloamin'
When he has done and finished his work. --------------- And me and my true love
Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme: -------------------- will yet meet again         (/GC/P/abT/Ch)
Oh, tell him to come and he'll have his shirt, ----------- Far above the bonnie
And he shall be a true lover of mine. -------------------- banks of Loch Lomond


http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/The+Bonnie+Banks+o'+Loch+Lomond
By yon bonnie banks and by yon bonnie braes
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond
Where me and my true love will ne-er meet again (alternate: Where me and my true love were ever lak/wont to gae)
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.

Chorus:
O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye
For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.

‘Twas there that we parted in yon shady glen
On the steep, steep sides o’ Ben Lomon'
Where in purple hue, the hielan hills we view
And the moon comin’ out in the gloamin’.

Chorus
O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye
For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.

The wee birdies sing and the wild flowers spring
And in sunshine the waters are sleeping
But the broken heart, it kens nae second spring again
Tho’ the waeful may cease frae their greetin'. (alternate: Tho' the world knows not how we are grieving)

Chorus
O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I'll tak' the low road
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye
For me and my true love will ne-er meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomon'.


http://www.metrolyrics.com/loch-lomond-lyrics-the-corries.html
As dauntless in battle
as tender in love
He'd yield ne'er
a foor toe the foeman (enemy)
But never again frae
the field o' the slain (from)
Tae his Moira
will he come by Loch Lomond
 
The thistle may bloom,
the King hae his ain (have his own)
And fond lovers
may meet in the gloamin'
And me and my true love
will yet meet again
Far above the bonnie
banks of Loch Lomond
 
(chorus)


http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/The+Bonnie+Banks+o'+Loch+Lomond ,  
The Bonnie Banks O' Loch Lomond
"The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond", or simply "Loch Lo

mond" for short, is a well-known traditional Scottish song (Roud No. 9598). It was first published in 1841 in Vocal Melodies of Scotland.[1]


*    parent {>> ("The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond" /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC} >> "QUOTATION MARK The" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> Bonnie /GC/S/abE/+cp >> Banks /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> o' /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> L /GC/P/abE/+bp >> O/GC/P/abE/+cp >> C /GC/P/abE/Ch/+bp >> H /GC/P/abE/Ch/+cp >> L /GC/S/abR/+bp >> O /GC/S/abR/+cp >> M /GC/S/abR/Ch/+bp >> O /GC/S/abR/Ch/+cp >> N /GC/P/abR/+bp >> D /GC/P/abR/+cp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /GC/P/abR/Ch/+bp >> or /GC/P/abR/Ch/+cp >> simply /mGC/abE/+bp >> "QUOTATION MARK" /mGC/abE/+cp >> L /mGC/abE/Ch/+bp >> O /mGC/abE/Ch/+cp >> C /mGC/abR/+bp >> H /mGC/abR/+cp >> L /mGC/abR/Ch/+bp >> O /mGC/abR/Ch/+cp

*    "Bonnie Banks" >> M /GC/S/abE/+bp >> O /GC/S/abE/+cp >> N /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> D /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> ~ ~ ~


Loch Lomond is a large Scottish loch located between the traditional counties of Dunbartonshire and Stirlingshire. The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond is often the final piece of music played during an evening of revelry (a disco or dinner, etc.) in Scotland, a phenomenon not seen in other parts of the United Kingdom.

Origins
Andrew Lang
About 1876, the Scottish poet and folklorist Andrew Lang wrote a poem based on the song titled "The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond". The title sometimes has the date "1746" appended[2]--the year of the defeat of Bonnie Prince Charlie's rebellion and the hanging of some of his captured supporters. Lang's poem begins:

*    father {>> (Origins /GC/S/abE/+bp)/mGC}  {>> ("Andrew Lang" /S/+bp)/GC/P/abE} >> "About 1" /GC/S/abE/+bp >> 8 /GC/S/abE/+cp >> 7 /GC/S/abE/Ch/+bp >> 6 /GC/S/abE/Ch/+cp >> the /GC/P/abE/+bp >> ~ ~ ~

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