SUBJECT: Adam Smith,  Cassius Dio,    Stephanus,  William Smith,  Pausanias,  Marcus Aurelius, Diogenes Laërtius
NAME: Young-Won Kim
DATE: 2011.08.03 - 00:57
Adam Smith,  Cassius Dio,  Stephanus of Byzantium,  William Smith,  Pausanias,  Marcus Aurelius, Diogenes Laërtius


>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Adam Smith's  "The Theory of Moral Sentiments"    and  Plutarch's "Moralia"


Re:     Article of    "Herder/Sanai/Hafez,  Dante, 'Adam Smith', 'Richard Cantillon', 'Henry More', ''Isaac Newton', Ricardo/Bentham"           <<Column  Adam Smith>>

*                ("Moralia [Mo  ra  li  ŋa]/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Theory of Moral Sentiments" /S)/T


http://www.attalus.org/info/moralia.html ,    
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Plutarch/Moralia/De_liberis_educandis*.html ,  

Plutarch : Moralia
On the education of children   -   De liberis educandis

1 Let us consider what may be said of the education of free-born children, and what advantages they should enjoy to give them a sound character when they grow up.

2 It is perhaps better to begin with their parentage first; and I should advise those desirous of becoming fathers of notable offspring bto abstain from random cohabitation with women; I mean with such women as courtesans and concubines. For those who are not well-born, whether on the father's or the mother's side, have an indelible disgrace in their low birth, which accompanies them throughout their lives, and offers to anyone desiring to use it a ready subject of reproach and insult. Wise was the poet who declares:

The home's foundation being wrongly laid,

The offspring needs must be unfortunate.1
 
A goodly treasure, then, is honourable birth, and such a man may speak his mind freely, a thing which should be held of the highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten. cIn the nature of things, the spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled, and quite rightly does the poet declare:

p7 A man, though bold, is made a slave whene'er

He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace. ~ ~
 

http://www.ibiblio.org/ml/libri/s/SmithA_MoralSentiments_p.pdf ,  
http://oll.libertyfund.org/simple.php?id=192 ,  

The Theory of Moral Sentiments
PART I
Of the Propriety of Action
Consisting of Three Sections
SECTION I
Of the Sense of Propriety
chap. i
OfSympathy
1How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either see it, or are made to conceive it in a very lively manner. That we often derive sorrow from the sorrow of others, is a matter of fact too obvious to require any instances to prove it; for this sentiment, like all the other original passions of human nature, is by no means confined to the virtuous and humane, though they perhaps may feel it with the most exquisite sensibility. The greatest ruffian, the most hardened violator of the laws of society, is not altogether without it.

2As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, ~ ~



*                ("Moralia [Mo  ra  li  ŋa]/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Theory of Moral Sentiments" /S)/T


1.               On <the> education of children ---

*                ("On education of children"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("PART I/One" /S)/T

2.                Of <the> Propriety of Action

*                ("1. column one"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Of Propriety of Action" /S)/T

3.        Let us consider what may be said of <the> education of free-born children

* ("Let us consider what may be said of education of free-born children"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Consisting of Three Sections" /S)/T

4.    and what advantages they should enjoy to give them <a> sound character when they grow up

* ("and what advantages they should enjoy to give them sound character when they grow up"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("SECTION I" /S)/T

5.                         Of <the> Sense of Propriety

*                ("2. column two"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Of Sense of Propriety" /S)/T

6.
*        ("It is perhaps better to begin with their parentage first"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("chap. i" /S)/T

7.
* ("and I should advise those desirous of becoming fathers of notable offspring bto abstain from random cohabitation with women"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Of Sympathy" /S)/T

8.
*       ("I mean with such women as courtesans and concubines"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("1/One" /S)/T

9.
*    ("For those who are not well-born"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("How selfish soever man may be supposed" /S)/T

10.              whether on <the> father's or <the> mother's side

*  ("whether on father's or mother's side"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("there are evidently some principles in his nature" /S)/T

11.        have <an> indelible disgrace in their low birth --- which interest him in <the> fortune of others

*      ("have indelible disgrace in their low birth"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("which interest him in fortune of others" /S)/T

12.
* ("which accompanies them throughout their lives"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("and render their happiness necessary to him" /S)/T

13. and offers to anyone desiring to use it <a> ready subject of reproach and insult --- though he derives nothing from it except <the> pleasure of seeing it

* ("and offers to anyone desiring to use it ready subject of reproach and insult"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("though he derives nothing from it except pleasure of seeing it" /S)/T

14.              Wise was <the> poet who declares

*             ("Wise was poet who declares"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("Of this kind is pity or compassion" /S)/T

15.   <The> home's foundation being wrongly laid --- <the> emotion which we feel for <the> misery of others

*      ("home's foundation being wrongly laid"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("emotion which we feel for misery of others" /S)/T

16.             <The> offspring needs must be unfortunate

*            ("offspring needs must be unfortunate"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("when we either see it" /S)/T

17.              <A> goodly treasure --- or are made to conceive it in <a> very lively manner

*          ("goodly treasure"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("or are made to conceive it in very lively manner" /S)/T

18.                   That we often derive sorrow from <the> sorrow of others

*                (then/+cp")/C2  >>   ("That we often derive sorrow from sorrow of others " /S)/T

19.              is <a> matter of fact too obvious to require any instances to prove it

* ("is honourable birth"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("is matter of fact too obvious to require any instances to prove it" /S)/T

20.             and such <a> man may speak his mind freely

*            ("and such man may speak his mind freely"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("for this sentiment" /S)/T

21. <a> thing which should be held of <the> highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten --- like all <the> other original passions of human nature

* ("thing which should be held of highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("like all other original passions of human nature" /S)/T

22.            In <the> nature of things --- is by no means confined to <the> virtuous and humane

*           ("In nature of things"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("is by no means confined to virtuous and humane" /S)/T

23. <the> spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled --- though they perhaps may feel it with <the> most exquisite sensibility

* ("spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("though they perhaps may feel it with most exquisite sensibility" /S)/T

24.             and quite rightly does <the> poet declare --- <The> greatest ruffian

*                ("and quite rightly does poet declare"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("greatest ruffian" /S)/T

25.                        <A> man --- <the> most hardened violator of <the> laws of society

*                (man/+cp")/C2  >>   ("most hardened violator of laws of society" /S)/T

26.
*                ("though bold"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("is not altogether without it" /S)/T

27.        is made <a> slave whene'er He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace

* ("is made slave whene'er He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace"/+cp")/C2  >>   ("As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel" /S)/T

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Adam Smith's  "Wealth of Nations"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3300/3300-h/3300-h.htm ,  


BOOK I. OF THE CAUSES OF IMPROVEMENT IN THE PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR, AND OF THE ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE.

CHAPTER I. OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR.

The greatest improvements in the productive powers of labour, and the greater part of the skill, dexterity, and judgment, with which it is anywhere directed, or applied, seem to have been the effects of the division of labour. The effects of the division of labour, in the general business of society, will be more easily understood, by considering in what manner it operates in some particular manufactures. It is commonly supposed to be carried furthest in some very trifling ones; not perhaps that it really is carried further in them than in others of more importance: but in those trifling manufactures which are destined to supply the small wants of but a small number of people, the whole number of workmen must necessarily be small; and those employed in every different branch of the work can often be collected into the same workhouse, and placed at once under the view of the spectator.


*  "Parallel Lives [Pa  ra  l=  le  l=  Li  ve  s=]" /C2/+bp  >>  ("Inquiry into Nature and Causes of Wealth of Nations" /S)/T  >>  ("Wealth of Nations" /S/Ch)/T


1.       OF <the> CAUSES OF IMPROVEMENT IN <the> PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR

* Theseus /C2/+bp  >>  ("BOOK I/One" /S)/T  >>  ("OF CAUSES OF IMPROVEMENT IN PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR" /S/Ch)/T

2. AND OF <the> ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG <the> DIFFERENT RANKS OF <the> PEOPLE

* "As geographers" /C2/+bp  >>  ("AND OF ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG DIFFERENT RANKS OF PEOPLE" /S)/T

3.            OF <the> DIVISION OF LABOUR

*     Sosius /C2/+bp  >>  ("CHAPTER I/One" /S)/T  >>  ("OF DIVISION OF LABOUR" /S/Ch)/T

4. crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about --- <The> greatest improvements in <the> productive powers of labour

* "crowd into edges of their maps parts of world which they do not know about" /C2/+bp  >>  ("greatest improvements in productive powers of labour" /S)/T

5.                adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect --- and <the> greater part of <the> skill

*              "adding notes in margin to effect" /C2/+bp  >>  ("and greater part of skill" /S)/T

6.
*       "that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts" /C2/+bp  >>  (dexterity /S)/T

7.
*              "unapproachable bogs" /C2/+bp  >>  ("and judgment" /S)/T

8.
*              "Scythian ice" /C2/+bp  >>  ("with which it is anywhere directed" /S)/T

9.                      or <a> frozen sea

*                "or frozen sea" /C2/+bp  >>  ("or applied" /S)/T

10.             seem to have been <the> effects of <the> division of labour

*               so /C2/+bp  >>  ("seem to have been effects of division of labour" /S)/T

11.              <The> effects of <the> division of labour

*              "in this work of mine" /C2/+bp  >>  ("effects of division of labour" /S)/T

12. in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another --- in <the> general business of society

* "in which I have compared lives of greatest men with one another" /C2/+bp  >>  ("in general business of society" /S)/T

13. after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in

* "after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find footing in" /C2/+bp  >>  ("will be more easily understood" /S)/T

14.
* "I might very well say of those that are farther off" /C2/+bp  >>  ("by considering in what manner it operates in some particular manufactures" /S)/T

15.
* "Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions" /C2/+bp  >>  ("" /S)/T

16.
* "It is commonly supposed to be carried furthest in some very trifling ones" /C2/+bp  >>  ("" /S)/T

17.             <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables

* "only inhabitants are poets and inventors of fables" /C2/+bp  >>  ("not perhaps that it really is carried further in them than in others of more importance" /S)/T

18. but in those trifling manufactures which are destined to supply <the> small wants of but <a> small number of people

* "there is no credit" /C2/+bp  >>  ("but in those trifling manufactures which are destined to supply small wants of but small number of people" /S)/T

19.              <the> whole number of workmen must necessarily be small

*     "or certainty any farther" /C2/+bp  >>  ("whole number of workmen must necessarily be small" /S)/T

20. and those employed in every different branch of <the> work can often be collected into <the> same workhouse

* Yet /C2/+bp  >>  ("and those employed in every different branch of work can often be collected into same workhouse" /S)/T

Et cetera.



François-Vincent Toussaint
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Fran%c3%a7ois-Vincent+Toussaint ,  

"François-Vincent Toussaint"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)                  "Denis Diderot"
"Marc-Antoine Eidous"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)/Ch                  "Denis Diderot"


Marc-Antoine Eidous
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Marc-Antoine+Eidous ,  

"François-Vincent Toussaint"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)                  "Denis Diderot"
"Marc-Antoine Eidous"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)/Ch                  "Denis Diderot"


Shaftesbury
Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Anthony+Ashley-Cooper%2c+3rd+Earl+of+Shaftesbury ,  

Shaftesbury                       (D/T + "-enis Diderot"/C2)                      "Denis Diderot"


Christopher Wren
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Christopher+Wren ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S


Pierre de Fermat
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Pierre+de+Fermat ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT


Nasir al-Din al-Tusi
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nasir_al-Din_al-Tusi ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT


Henry Oldenburg
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Henry+Oldenburg ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch  >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T


Simon Stevin
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Simon+Stevin ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T   >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P


Aloysius Lilius
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Aloysius+Lilius ,    

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T


Christopher Clavius
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Christopher+Clavius ,    

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T


Jacques Auguste de Thou
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Jacques+Auguste+de+Thou ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T


Adriaan van Roomen
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Adriaan+van+Roomen ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T


Alexander Anderson (mathematician)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Alexander+Anderson+(mathematician) ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S


Scipione del Ferro
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Scipione+del+Ferro ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S  >>  ("Scipione del Ferro" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/P


Niccolo Fontana Tartaglia
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Niccolo+Fontana+Tartaglia ,    

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S  >>  ("Scipione del Ferro" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/P  >>  (Tartaglia /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/P


Raphael Bombelli
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Raphael+Bombelli ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S  >>  ("Scipione del Ferro" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/P  >>  (Tartaglia /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/P  >>  ("Raphael Bombelli" /S)/P



Robert Recorde
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Robert+Recorde ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S  >>  ("Scipione del Ferro" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/P  >>  (Tartaglia /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/P  >>  ("Raphael Bombelli" /S)/P  >>  ("Robert Recorde" /P)/C2

>>       He introduced the "equals" sign (=) in 1557.

*     ("Robert Recorde" /P)/C2  >>  Recorde /P  >>  equals /S  >>  "double minus" /C2  >>  "1557" /GC/S/Ch/abT



Guilielmus Xylander
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Guilielmus+Xylander ,  

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  Wallis /P/Ch >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Wren /T)/S  >>  ("van Heuraët" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("van Schooten" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Fermat /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Christian Huygens" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Thabit Ibn Qurra" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Nasir al-Din al-Tusi" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Sadr al-Tusi" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Oldenburg" /C2)/T  >>  ("Simon Stevin" /T)/P  >>  ("Aloysius Lilius" /S)/T  >>  ("Christopher Clavius" /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Jacques Auguste de Thou" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/T  >>  ("Adriaan van Roomen" /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("Alexander Anderson" /C2)/S  >>  ("Scipione del Ferro" /GC/S/Ch/abT)/P  >>  (Tartaglia /GC/S/Ch/abT/Ch)/P  >>  ("Raphael Bombelli" /S)/P  >>  ("Robert Recorde" /P)/C2  >>  (Xylander /P/Ch)/C2



Cassius Dio
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Cassius+Dio ,  

>>           Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus[1][2] (Greek: Δίων ὁ Κάσσιος, c. AD 155 or 163/164[3] to after 229), known in English as Cassius Dio, Dio Cassius, or Dio (Dione. lib)

* Plutarch  >>  ("Cassius Dio" /T/+cp)/P  >>  Dio /T  >>  "Dio Cassius" /P  >>  Dione /P/Ch  >>  "Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus" /S

>>              Roman History, in 80 books,

"Roman History"                     (C/P + "-assius Dio's work"/T)/Ch                   "Cassius Dio's work"
"80 books"                     (C/P + "-assius Dio's work"/T)                   "Cassius Dio's work"

"Roman History"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/T)/Ch                  "Essays and miscellanies"


>>     The fragments of the first 36 books, as now collected, are of four kinds:
1.    Fragmenta Valesiana, such as were dispersed throughout various writers, scholiasts, grammarians, and lexicographers, and were collected by Henri Valois.

* "Roman History"  >>  ("Fragmenta Valesiana" /T)/P  >>  ("first 36 books" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("various writers, scholiasts, grammarians, and lexicographers" /GC/S/abT)/P  >>  ("Henri Valois" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P

2.    Fragmenta Peiresciana, comprising large extracts, found in the section entitled "Of Virtues and Vices", in the great collection or portative library compiled by order of Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus. The manuscript of this belonged to Peiresc.

* "Roman History"  >>  ("Fragmenta Peiresciana" /T)/C2  >>  ("Of Virtues and Vices" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (great collection or portative library compiled by order of Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus" /GC/S/abT)/C2  >>  (Peiresc /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2

3.    The fragments of the first 34 books, preserved in the second section of the same work of Constantine's, entitled “Of Embassies.” These are known under the name of Fragmenta Ursiniana, because the manuscript containing them was found in Sicily by Fulvio Orsini.

* "Roman History"  >>  ("Fragmenta Ursiniana" /C2)/P  >>  ("second section of same work of Constantine's, entitled Of Embassies" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("found in Sicily" /C2)/T  >>  ("Fulvio Orsini" /C2/Ch)/T

4.    Excerpta Vaticana, by Angelo Mai, which contain fragments of books 1 to 35, and 61 to 80. To these are added the fragments of an unknown continuator of Dio (Anonymus post Dionem), generally identified with the 6th-century historian Peter the Patrician, which go down to the time of Constantine. Other fragments from Dio belonging chiefly to the first 34 books were found by Mai in two Vatican MSS., which contain a collection made by Maximus Planudes. The annals of Joannes Zonaras also contain numerous extracts from Dio.

* "Roman History"  >>  ("Excerpta Vaticana" /C2)/S  >>  ("fragments of books 1 to 35, and 61 to 80" /C2/Ch)/S  >>  ("fragments of unknown continuator of Dio " /GC/S/abT)/S  >>  (Angelo Mai" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Cassius Dio's  "ROMAN HISTORY"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c#a3339 ,    
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/18047 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18047/18047-h/18047-h.htm ,    
DIO'S ROMAN HISTORY

AN EPITOME
of
THE LOST BOOKS I-XXI OF DIO
as found in the
CHRONICON
of
IOANNES ZONARAS.

(BOOK 1, BOISSEVAIN.)

Frag. 1VII, 1.—Æneas after the Trojan war came to the Aborigines, who were the former inhabitants of the land wherein Rome has been built and at that time had Latinus, the son of Faunus, as their sovereign. He came ashore at Laurentum, by the mouth of the river Numicius, where in obedience to some oracle he is said to have made preparations to dwell.

The ruler of the land, Latinus, interfered with Æneas's settling in the land, but after a sharp struggle was defeated. Then in accordance with dreams that appeared to both leaders they effected a reconciliation and the king beside permitting Æneas to reside ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a342 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3052 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3052/3052-h/3052-h.htm ,  
Essays and Miscellanies by Plutarch

PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS
THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO LIVE PLEASURABLY ACCORDING TO THE DOCTRINE OF EPICURUS.
PLUTARCH, ZEUXIPPUS, THEON, ARISTODEMUS.
Epicurus's great confidant and familiar, Colotes, set forth a book with this title to it, that according to the tenets of the other philosophers it is impossible to live. Now what occurred to me then to say against him, in the defence of those philosophers, hath been already put into writing by me. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in the walks in further opposition to his party, I thought it not amiss to recollect them also, if for no other reason, yet for this one, that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over the discourses and writings of those they would disprove, nor by tearing out one word here and another there, or by falling foul upon particular passages without the books, to impose upon the ignorant and unlearned.

Now as we were leaving the school to take a walk (as our manner is) in the gymnasium, Zeuxippus began to us: In my opinion, said he, the debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting. I am sure, Heraclides went away disgusted with us, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved. Yet you may remember, replied Theon, how you told them that Colotes himself, compared with the rhetoric of those two gentlemen, would appear the complaisantest man alive; for when they have raked together the lewdest terms of ignominy the tongue of man ever used, as buffooneries, trollings, arrogancies, whorings, assassinations, whining counterfeits, black-guards, and blockheads, they faintly throw them in the faces of Aristotle, Socrates, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Theophrastus, Heraclides, Hipparchus, and which not, even of the best and most celebrated authorities. So that, should they pass for very knowing men upon all other accounts, yet their very calumnies and reviling language would bespeak them at the greatest distance from philosophy imaginable. For emulation can never enter that godlike consort, nor such fretfulness as wants resolution to conceal its own resentments. Aristodemus then subjoined: Heraclides, you know, is a great philologist; and that may be the reason why he made Epicurus those amends for the poetic din (so, that party style poetry) and for the fooleries of Homer; or else, it may be, it was because Metrodorus had libelled that poet in so many books. But let us let these gentlemen pass at present, Zeuxippus, and rather return to what was charged upon the philosophers in the beginning of our discourse, that it is impossible to live according to their tenets. And I see not why we two may not despatch this affair betwixt us, with the good assistance of Theon; for I find this gentleman (meaning me) is already tired. Then Theon said to him,

     Our fellows have that garland from us won;

therefore, if you please,

     Let's fix another goal, and at that run.
     ("Odyssey," xxii, 6)

We will even prosecute them at the suit of the philosophers, in the following form: We'll prove, if we can, that it is impossible to live a pleasurable life according to their tenets. Bless me! said I to him, smiling, you seem to me to level your foot at the very bellies of the men, and to design to enter the list with them for their lives, whilst you go about to rob them thus of their pleasure, and they cry out to you,

     "Forbear, we're no good boxers, sir;

no, nor good pleaders, nor good senators, nor good magistrates either;

     "Our proper talent is to eat and drink."
     ("Odyssey," viii, 246, 248)


"Roman History"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/T)/Ch                  "Essays and miscellanies"


1. AN EPITOME of <THE> LOST BOOKS I-XXI OF DIO as found in <the> CHRONICON of IOANNES ZONARAS.

epitome                   (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/T)/Ch                  "philosophical essays"

2.     that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of epicurus

"of"                   (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of epicurus"/T)/Ch                  "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of epicurus"

3.
LOST                                  (P/P + lutarch/T)/Ch                                 Plutarch

4.
BOOKS                               (Z/P + euxippus/T)/Ch                              Zeuxippus

5.
One                                     (Th/P + eon/T)/Ch                                   Theon

6.
"twenty-one"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/T)/Ch                    Aristodemus

7.
OF                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/T)/Ch                  "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
DIO                                   (C/P + olotes/T)/Ch                                  Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

as                   (s/P + "-et forth book with this title to it"/T)/Ch                  "set forth book with this title to it"

10.     that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

found                   (th/P + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/T)/Ch                  "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.
in                   (N/P + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/T)/Ch                  "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.                  in <the> defence of those philosophers

CHRONICON                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in defence of those philosophers"/T)/Ch                  "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
of                   (h/P + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/T)/Ch                  "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party

IOANNES                  (B/P + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/T)/Ch                  "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.
ZONARAS                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/T)/Ch                  "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
BOOK                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "if for no other reason"/T)/Ch                  "if for no other reason"

17.
"1/one"                        (y/P + "-et for this one"/T)/Ch                      "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

BOISSEVAIN                  (th/P + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/T)/Ch                  "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.
"VII/seven"                   (n/P + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/T)/Ch                  "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.               or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

"1/One"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/T)/Ch                  "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

Æneas                   (t/P + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/T)/Ch                  "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

after                    (N/P + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/T)/Ch                  "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
Trojan                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as our manner is"/T)/Ch                  "as our manner is"

24.                    in <the> gymnasium

war                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in gymnasium"/T)/Ch                  "in gymnasium"

25.
came                  (Z/P + "-euxippus began to us"/T)/Ch                  "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
to                       ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "In my opinion"/T)/Ch                      "In my opinion"

27.
Aborigines                             (s/P + "-aid he"/T)/Ch                             "said he"

28.     <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

who                  (d/P + " ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/T)/Ch                  "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera    as below.


Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk - (after) -- (as our manner is - (Trojan) --) in <the> gymnasium - (war) --, Zeuxippus began to us - (came) --: In my opinion - (to) --, said he - (Aborigines) --, <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting - (who) --. I am sure - (were) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (former) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (inhabitants) --. Yet you may remember - (of) --, replied Theon - (land) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (wherein) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (Rome) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (has) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (been) --, as buffooneries - (built) --, trollings - (and) --, arrogancies - (at) --, whorings - (that) --, assassinations - (time) --, whining counterfeits - (had) --, black-guards - (Latinus) --, and blockheads - (son) --, they faintly throw them in <the> faces of Aristotle - (of) --, Socrates - (Faunus) --, Pythagoras - (as) --, Protagoras - (their) --, Theophrastus - (sovereign) --, Heraclides - (He) --, Hipparchus - (came) --, and which not - (ashore) --, even of <the> best and most celebrated authorities - (at) --. So that - (Laurentum) --, should they pass for very knowing men upon all other accounts - (by) --, yet their very calumnies and reviling language would bespeak them at <the> greatest distance from philosophy imaginable - (mouth) --. For emulation can never enter that godlike consort - (of) --, nor such fretfulness as wants resolution to conceal its own resentments - (river) --. Aristodemus then subjoined - (Numicius) --: Heraclides - (where) --, you know - (in) --, is <a> great philologist - (obedience) --; and that may be <the> reason why he made Epicurus those amends for <the> poetic din - (to) -- (so - (some) --, that party style poetry - (oracle) --) and for <the> fooleries of Homer - (he) --; or else - (is) --, it may be - (said) --, it was because Metrodorus had libelled that poet in so many books - (to) --. But let us let these gentlemen pass at present - (have) --, Zeuxippus - (made) --, and rather return to what was charged upon <the> philosophers in <the> beginning of our discourse - (preparations) --, that it is impossible to live according to their tenets - (to) --. And I see not why we two may not despatch this affair betwixt us - (dwell) --, with <the> good assistance of Theon - (ruler) --; for I find this gentleman - (of) -- (meaning me - (land) --) is already tired - (Latinus) --. Then Theon said to him - (interfered) --,

Our fellows have that garland from us won - (with) --;

therefore - (Æneas's) --, if you please - (settling) --,

     Let's fix another goal - (in) --, and at that run - (land) --.
     ("Odyssey - (but) --," xxii - (after) --, 6 - (sharp) --)

We will even prosecute them at <the> suit of <the> philosophers - (sharp) --, in <the> following form - (struggle) --: We'll prove - (was) --, if we can - (defeated) --, that it is impossible to live <a> pleasurable life according to their tenets - (Then) --. Bless me - (in) --! said I to him - (accordance) --, smiling - (with) --, you seem to me to level your foot at <the> very bellies of <the> men - (dreams) --, and to design to enter <the> list with them for their lives - (that) --, whilst you go about to rob them thus of their pleasure - (appeared) --, and they cry out to you - (to) --,

     "Forbear - (both) --, we're no good boxers - (leaders) --, sir - (they) --;

no - (effected) --, nor good pleaders - (reconciliation) --, nor good senators - (and) --, nor good magistrates either - (king) --;

     "Our proper talent is to eat and drink - (beside) --."
     ("Odyssey - (permitting) --," viii - (Æneas) --, 246 - (to) --, 248 - (reside) --)

Et cetera.



Stephanus of Byzantium
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Stephanus+of+Byzantium ,  


"Stephanus of Byzantium"                       (P/C2 + lutarch/T)/Ch                     Plutarch

Ethnica                    (St/P + "-ephanus of Byzantium's work"/C2)                   "Stephanus of Byzantium's work"

Ethnica                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)                  "Essays and miscellanies"

>>            Stephen of Byzantium, also known as Stephanus Byzantinus

*        "Stephanus of Byzantium"  >>  "Stephen of Byzantium" /C2  >>  "Stephanus Byzantinus" /GC/S/abT


Author:     Smith, William, Sir, ed. 1813-1893.
Title:             A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology. By various writers. Ed. by William Smith. Illustrated by numerous engravings on wood.

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Dictionary+of+Greek+and+Roman+Biography+and+Mythology ,  
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;idno=ACL3129.0001.001 ,    
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/acl3129.0001.001/16?page=root;rgn=full+text;size=100;view=image ,    


* Ethnica  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology" /C2)/P  >>  ("By various writers" /C1)/S  >>  ("Edited by William Smith" /C1/Ch)/S  >>  ("Illustrated by numerous engravings on wood" /C1)/GC/S/abT

*          "William Smith"  >>  William /C2  >>  Smith /C2/Ch  >>  Sir /GC/S/abT

>>       companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Dictionary+of+Greek+and+Roman+Biography+and+Mythology ,  

* Ethnica  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology" /C2)/P  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities" /P/+cp)/S  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography" /P/+cp/Ch)/S

>> The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor,
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moa/acl3129.0001.001/8?page=root;rgn=full+text;size=100;view=image ,  

* authors  >>  ("Alexander Allen, Ph. D." /S/+bp)/P  >>  ("Charles Thomas Arnold, M.A." /S/+bp/Ch)/P  >>  ("One of Masters in Rugby School" /S/+cp)/P  >>  ("John Ernest Bode, M.A." /S/+cp/Ch)/P
  >>  ("Student of Christ Church, Oxford" /S/+bp)/T  >>  ("Christian A. Brandis" /S/+bp/Ch)/T  >>  ("Professor in University of Bonn" /S/+cp)/T  >>  ("Edward Herbert Bunbury, M. A." /S/+cp/Ch)/T
  >>  ("Late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge" /S/+bp)/C2  >>  ("Albany James Christie, M.A." /S/+bp/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Late Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford" /S/+cp)/C2  >>  ("Arthur Hugh Clough, M.A." /S/+cp/Ch)/C2
  >>  ("Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford" /S/+bp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("George Edward Lynch Cotton, M.A." /S/+bp/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge" /S/+cp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("one of Masters in Rugby School" /S/+cp/Ch)/GC/S/abT
  >>  ("Samuel Davidson, LL.D." /T/+bp)/S  >>  ("William Fishburn Donkin, M.A." /T/+bp/Ch)/S  >>  ("Savilian Professor of Astronomy in University of Oxford" /T/+cp)/S  >>  ("William Bodham Donne" /T/+cp/Ch)/S
  >>  ("Thomas Dyer" /T/+bp)/P  >>  ("Edward Elder, M.A." /T/+bp/Ch)/P  >>  ("Head Master of Durham School" /T/+cp)/P  >>  ("John Thomas Graves, M.A., F..R.S." /T/+cp/Ch)/P
  >>  ("William Alexander Greenhill, M.D." /T/+bp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Trinity College, Oxford" /T/+bp/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Algernon Grenfell, M.A." /T/+cp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("One of Masters in Rugby School" /T/+cp/Ch)/GC/S/abT
   >>  ("William Maxwell Gunn" /T/+bp)/C2  >>  ("One of Masters in High School, Edinburgh" /T/+bp/Ch)/C2  >>  ("William Ihne, Ph. D." /T/+cp)/C2  >>  ("Of University of Boun" /T/+cp/Ch)/C2
  >>  ("Benjamin Jowett, M.A." /C2/+bp)/P  >>  ("Fellow and Tutor of Baliol College, Oxford" /C2/+bp/Ch)/P  >>  ("Henry George Liddell, M.A." /C2/+cp)/P  >>  ("Head Master of Westminster School" /C2/+cp/Ch)/P
  >>  ("George Long, M.A." /C2/+bp)/T  >>  ("Late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge" /C2/+bp/Ch)/T  >>  ("John Morell Mackenzie, M.A." /C2/+cp)/T  >>  ("Charles Peter Mason, B.A." /C2/+cp/Ch)/T
  >>  ("Fellow of University College, London" /C2/+bp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Calrow Means" /C2/+bp/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Hart Milman, M.A." /C2/+cp)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Prebendary of St. Peter's, Westminster" /C2/+cp/Ch)/GC/S/abT
  >>  ("Augustus de Morgan" /C2/+bp)/S  >>  ("Professor of Mathematics in University College, London" /C2/+bp/Ch)/S  >>  ("William Plate, LL. D." /C2/+cp)/S  >>  ("Constantine Estlin Prichard, B.A." /C2/+cp/Ch)/S
  >>  ("Fellow of Baliol College, Oxford" /GC/S/abT/+bp)/P  >>  ("William Ramsay, M.A." /GC/S/abT/+bp/Ch)/P  >>  ("Professor of Humanity in University of Glasgow" /GC/S/abT/+cp)/P  >>  ("Leonhard Schmitz, Ph. D., F..R.S.E." /GC/S/abT/+cp/Ch)/P
  >>  ("Rector of High School of Edinburgh" /GC/S/abT/+bp)/S  >>  ("Philip Smith, B.A." /GC/S/abT/+bp/Ch)/S  >>  ("Of University College, London" /GC/S/abT/+cp)/S  >>  ("Arthur Penryhn Stanley, M.A." /GC/S/abT/+cp/Ch)/S
  >>  ("Fellow and Tutor of University College, Oxford" /GC/S/abT/+bp)/C2  >>  ("Adolph Stahe" /GC/S/abT/+bp/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Professor in Gymnasium of Oldenburg" /GC/S/abT/+cp)/C2  >>  ("Ludwig Urlichs" /GC/S/abT/+cp/Ch)/C2
  >>  ("Professor in University of Bonn" /GC/S/abT/+bp)/T  >>  ("Robert Whiston, M.A." /GC/S/abT/+bp/Ch)/T  >>  ("Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge" /GC/S/abT/+cp)/T  >>  (editor /GC/S/abT/+cp/Ch)/T



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Ethnica   (Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology)   and  Plutarch's  "Essays and miscellanies"

Ethnica                    (St/P + "-ephanus of Byzantium's work"/C2)                   "Stephanus of Byzantium's work"

Ethnica                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)                  "Essays and miscellanies"

1.
dictionary                   (ph/P + ilosophical/C1)                  philosophical

of                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + essays/C2)                  essays"

2.     that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of epicurus

Greek                   (th/P + at/C1)                   that
and                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + it/C2)                  it
Roman                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + is/C1)                  is
biography                   (n/P + ot/C1)                  not
and                   (p/P + ossible/C1)                   possible
mythology                   (t/P + o/C1)                  to

Abaris                   (l/P + ive/C1)                   live
Abaeus                   (pl/P + easurably/C2)                 pleasurably
surname                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + according/C1)                 according
"of Apollo"                  ("to d"/P + "-octrine of"/C2)                  "to doctrine of"
derived                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + epicurus/C1)                   epicurus


3.
from                                  (Plut/P + arch/C1)                                 Plutarch

4.
town                               (Z/P + euxippus/C2)                              Zeuxippus

5.
of                                     (Th/P + eon/C1)                                   Theon

6.
Abae                    ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/C2)                    Aristodemus

7.            Epicurus's great confidant and familiar

in                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Epicurus's/C1)                   Epicurus's
Phocis                   (gr/P + eat/C2)                   great
where                   (c/P + onfidant/C2)                   confidant
god                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + and/C2)                   and
had                   (f/P + amiliar/C1)                   familiar


8.
rich                                   (C/P + olotes/C1)                                  Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

temple                   (s/P + et/C2)                   set
Hesych                   (f/P + orth/C2)                   forth
s                   (b/P + ook/C2)                    book
v                   (w/P + ith/C2)                    with
Asai                   (th/P + is/C21)                    this
Herod                   (t/P + itle/C2)                    title
eight                   (t/P + "-o it"/C2)                   "to it"

10.     that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

"33"                   (th/P + "-at according"/C2)                   "that according"
Paus                   ("to t"/P + "-enets"/C2)                   "to tenets"
ten                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "of other"/C1)                   "of other"
"35"                   (ph/P + ilosophers/C2)                    philosophers
one                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "it is"/C2)                   "it is"
"&c., et cetera"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + impossible/C2)                    impossible

L                    ("to l-"/P + ive/C2)                   "to live"

11.               Now what occurred to me then to say against him

S                   (N/P + ow/C2)                    Now
Abammon                   (wh/P + "at occurred"/C2)                   "what occurred"
Magister                  ("to m-"/P + e/C2)                   "to me"
Porphyrius                  (th/P + "-en to"/C2)                   "then to"
Abantiades                  (s/P + ay/C1)                   say

signifies                    ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "against him"/C1)                    "against him"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   William Smith's  "Dictionary of (or) Greek and Roman geography"   and  Plutarch's  "Essays and miscellanies"

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Dictionary+of+Greek+and+Roman+Geography ,    
http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA1&dq=bibliogroup:%22Dictionary+of+Greek+and+Roman+Geography%22&id=bSsbAAAAYAAJ&hl=ko&output=text ,  

A DICTIONARY
or
GREEK AND ROMAN GEOGRAPHY.

ABACAENUM.

ABACAEJTUM (,Aft£ic<ui'ov, Diod., Steph Byz.: 'AJinmi, Ptol.: EtK. 'A.€atcatfU-m : nr. 7Wpi,Ru.), a city of Sicily, situated, about 4 miles from the N. , between Tyndaris and Mylae, and 8 from the city. It was a city of the Siculi, and does appear to have ever received a Greek colony, it partook largely of the influence of Greek an and civilisation. Its territory originally included tmt of Tyndaris, which was separated from it by tie elder Dionysius when he founded that city in B. c. 396 (Koi xiv. 78). From the way in which it is mentioned in the wars of Dionysius, Agathocles, and Hi;ran (Diod. xiv_ QO, xix. 65, 110, xrii. Exc. Hoeschel. p. 499), it is clear that it was a place of poorer and importance ; but from the time of llieron it disappears from history, and no mention is found of it in the Verrine orations of Cicero. Its name is, fcoverer, fbond in Ptolemy (iii. 4. § 12), so that it appears to have still oontinned to exist in his day. hi decline was probably owing to the increasing prosperity of the neighbouring city of Tyndaris.


Essays and Miscellanies by Plutarch

PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS
THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO LIVE PLEASURABLY ACCORDING TO THE DOCTRINE OF EPICURUS.
PLUTARCH, ZEUXIPPUS, THEON, ARISTODEMUS.
Epicurus's great confidant and familiar, Colotes, set forth a book with this title to it, that according to the tenets of the other philosophers it is impossible to live. Now what occurred to me then to say against him, in the defence of those philosophers, hath been already put into writing by me. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in the walks in further opposition to his party, I thought it not amiss to recollect them also, if for no other reason, yet for this one, that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over the discourses and writings of those they would disprove, nor by tearing out one word here and another there, or by falling foul upon particular passages without the books, to impose upon the ignorant and unlearned.


* Ethnica  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology" /C2)/P  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities" /P/+cp)/S  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography" /P/+cp/Ch)/S


1.
*                  PHILOSOPHICAL  >>  ("DICTIONARY" /T)/C1

2.
*                  ESSAYS  >>  (or /T)/C1
*                  ESSAYS  >>  (of /T/Ch)/C1

3.
*                  THAT  >>  (GREEK /T)/C2

4.
*                  IT  >>  (AND /T)/C1

5.
*                  IS  >>  (ROMAN /T)/C2

6.
*                  NOT  >>  (GEOGRAPHY /T)/C2

7.
*                  POSSIBLE >>  (ABACAENUM. /T)/C2

8.
*                  "TO LIVE"  >>  ("ABACAEJTUM" /T)/C1

9.
*                  PLEASURABLY  >>  (Diod /T)/C2

10.
*                  "ACCORDING TO"  >>  (Steph /T)/C2

11.
*                  DOCTRINE  >>  (Byz /T)/C1

12.
*                  "OF EPICURUS"  >>  (AJinmi /T)/C2

13.
*                  PLUTARCH  >>  (Ptol /T)/C2

14.
*                  ZEUXIPPUS >>  ("EtK" /T)/C2

15.
*                  THEON  >>  (A /T)/C2

16.
*                  ARISTODEMUS  >>  (€atcatfU /T)/C1

17.
*                  Epicurus's  >>  (m /T)/C2

18.
*                  great  >>  ("nr" /T)/C1

19.
*                  confidant  >>  ("7Wpi" /T)/C1

20.
*                  "and familiar"  >>  (Ru /T)/C1

21.
*                  Colotes  >>  ("city of Sicily" /T)/C1

22.
*                  "set forth"  >>  (situated /T)/C2

23.
*                  "book with"  >>  (about /T)/C1

24.
*                  "this title"  >>  ("4 miles" /T)/C1

25.
*                  "to it"  >>  (from /T)/C2

26.
*                  "that according to"  >>  (N /T)/C1

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   William Smith's  "A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities"   and  Plutarch's  "Essays and miscellanies"

* Ethnica  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology" /C2)/P  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities" /P/+cp)/S  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography" /P/+cp/Ch)/S

http://books.google.com/books?id=zfIrAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR7&dq=inauthor:%22Sir+William+Smith%22&hl=ko&output=text ,    
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities
Preface to the second edition
It W3-- inevitable -that many defects should be found in the first Edition of work like the EHetionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, embracing a gres %axi* ty of subjects, written by different persons, and published periodical! Of tbes-e no one was more fully aware than the Editor; and accordingly when the sale of a very large impression rendered the preparation of a secon Edition necessary, be resolved to spare no pains and exertions to render th irort still more worthy of the approbation with which it had been alread received- The following will be found to be the principal improvements i the present Edition.

1.
"Dictionary of"                (PH/P + ILOSOPHICAL/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   PHILOSOPHICAL

2.
Greek                      ([ŋ=  y=]/P + ESSAYS/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       ESSAYS

3.
and                                     (TH/P + AT/S/abT)/+bp                               THAT

4.
Roman                      ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "IT IS"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                          "IT IS"

5.
Antiquities                  (N/P + "-OT POSSIBLE"/GC/S/abT)/+bp               "NOT POSSIBLE"

6.
"Preface to"                       ("TO L-"/P + IVE/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       "TO LIVE"

7.
"second edition"                  (PL/P + EASURABLY/GC/S/abT)/+bp                    PLEASURABLY

8.
"It W3"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "ACCORDING TO"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "ACCORDING TO"

9.
inevitable                       (D/P + OCTRINE/GC/S/abT)/+bp                        DOCTRINE

10.
"that many"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "OF EPICURUS"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "OF EPICURUS"

11.
defects                          (PLUT/P + ARCH/GC/S/abT)/+bp                        PLUTARCH

12.
"should be"                     (ZEUX/P + IPPUS/GC/S/abT)/+bp                     "ZEUXIPPUS"

13.
"found in"                         (TH/P + EON/GC/S/abT)/+bp                             THEON

14.
"first Edition"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + ARISTODEMUS/GC/S/abT)/+bp                    ARISTODEMUS

15.
"of work"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Epicurus's"

16.
like                     (gr/P + "-eat confidant"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "great confidant"

17.
EHetionary                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and familiar"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                "and familiar"

18.
"of Greek"                         (C/P + olotes/GC/S/abT)/+bp                            Colotes

19.
and                            (s/P + "-et forth"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                         "set forth"

20.
Roman                        ("book w-"/P + ith/GC/S/abT)/+bp                        "book with"

21.
Antiquities                      (th/P + "-is title"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                         "this title"

22.
embracing                              (to/P + it/GC/S/abT)/+bp                             "to it"

23.
a                     (th/P + "-at according"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       "that according"

24.
gres                       ("to t"/P + "-enets of"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                      "to tenets of"

25.
axi                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "other philosophers"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "other philosophers"

26.
ty                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "it is impossible"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "it is impossible"

27.
of                              ("to l-"/P + ive/GC/S/abT)/+bp                              "to live"

28.
subjects                       (N/P + "-ow what"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       "Now what"

Et cetera.



William Smith (lexicographer)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Smith+(lexicographer) ,  

* Ethnica  >>  ("Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology" /C2)/P  >>  ("By various writers" /C1)/S  >>  ("Edited by William Smith" /C1/Ch)/S  >>  ("Illustrated by numerous engravings on wood" /C1)/GC/S/abT

>>                     in the venture by the publisher John Murray

*                      "William Smith"  >>  ("John Murray" /P/Ch)/T

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a822 ,      
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2096/2096-h/2096-h.htm ,    
A SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE
from the earliest times to the Roman conquest.
by
WILLIAM SMITH, D.C.L., LL.D.

*          "William Smith"  >>  William /C2  >>  Smith /C2/Ch  >>  Sir /GC/S/abT

"D.C.L., LL.D."                 (W/GC/S/abT + "-illiam Smith"/C1)                 "William Smith"

"SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE"                 (W/C1 + "-illiam Smith's work"/P)                 "William Smith's work"

"SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE"                 (Sym/C1 + posiacs/P)                  Symposiacs

A Smaller History of Rome    by Eugene Lawrence and Sir William Smith

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19694/19694-h/19694-h.htm ,    
A SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME,
FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE EMPIRE.
BY WILLIAM SMITH, LL.D.
WITH A CONTINUATION TO A.D. 479. BY EUGENE LAWRENCE, A.M.

"LL.D."                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-illiam Smith"/C1)/Ch                    "William Smith"

"SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME"                 (W/C1 + "-illiam Smith's work"/P)/Ch                 "William Smith's work"

"SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME"                 (Sym/C1 + posiacs/P)/Ch                  Symposiacs



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   William Smith's  "SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE"   and  Plutarch's  "Symposiacs"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2096/2096-h/2096-h.htm ,  
A SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE
from the earliest times to the Roman conquest.
by
WILLIAM SMITH, D.C.L., LL.D.

CHAPTER I.
GEOGRAPHY OF GREECE.

Greece is the southern portion of a great peninsula of Europe, washed on three sides by the Mediterranean Sea. It is bounded on the north by the Cambunian mountains, which separate it from Macedonia. It extends from the fortieth degree of latitude to the thirty-sixth, its greatest length being not more than 250 English miles, and its greatest breadth only 180. Its surface is considerably less than that of Portugal. This small area was divided among a number of independent states, many of them containing a territory of only a few square miles, and none of them larger than an English county. But the heroism and genius of the Greeks have given an interest to the insignificant spot of earth bearing their name, which the vastest empires have never equalled.


http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/symposiacs/ ,    

Symposiacs, by Plutarch
Book I.

Some, my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence, [Greek omitted] was principally designed against the stewards of a feast, who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon the guests. For the Dorians in Sicily (as I am informed) called the steward, [Greek omitted] a REMEMBRANCER. Others think that this proverb admonisheth the guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company; and agreeably to this, the ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with a ferula to Bacchus, thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company, or apply a gentle and childish correction to the faults. But because you are of opinion (as Euripides says) that to forget absurdities is indeed a piece of wisdom, but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to an entertainment, but against the known practice of the greatest philosophers (for Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Speusippus, Epicurus, Prytanis, Hieronymus, Dion the Academic, have thought it a worthy and noble employment to deliver down to us those discourses they had at table), and since it is your pleasure that I should gather up the chiefest of those scattered topics which both at Rome and Greece amidst our cups and feasting we have disputed on, in obedience to your commands I have sent three books, each containing ten problems; and the rest shall quickly follow, if these find good acceptance and do not seem altogether foolish and impertinent.

QUESTION I.
Whether at Table It is Allowable to Philosophize?
SOSSIUS, SENECIO, ARISTO, PLUTARCH, CRATO, and OTHERS.


"SMALLER HISTORY OF GREECE"                 (Sym/C1 + posiacs/P)                  Symposiacs


1.             from <the> earliest times to <the> Roman conquest.

"from earliest times to Roman conquest"                 (Boo/C1 + "-k one"/P)                  "Book I/one"

2.
"CHAPTER I/one"                               (S/C1 + ome/P)                               Some

3.
"GEOGRAPHY OF GREECE"                 (my/C1 + "dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"/P)                  "my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"

4. Greece is <the> southern portion of <a> great peninsula of Europe --- was principally designed against <the> stewards of <a> feast

"Greece is southern portion of great peninsula of Europe"                 (w/C1 + "-as principally designed against stewards of feast"/P)                  "was principally designed against stewards of feast"

5. who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon <the> guests --- washed on three sides by <the> Mediterranean Sea

"washed on three sides by Mediterranean Sea"                 (wh/C1 + "-o are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"/P)                  "who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"

6.        For <the> Dorians in Sicily --- It is bounded on <the> north by <the> Cambunian mountains

"It is bounded on north by Cambunian mountains"                 (F/C1 + "-or Dorians in Sicily"/P)                  "For Dorians in Sicily"

7.
"which separate it from Macedonia"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "as I am informed"/P)                  "as I am informed"

8.            called <the> steward --- It extends from <the> fortieth degree of latitude to <the> thirty-sixth

"It extends from fortieth degree of latitude to thirty-sixth"                 (c/C1 + "-alled steward"/P)                  "called steward"

9.                <a> REMEMBRANCER

"its greatest length being not more than 250 English miles"                 (R/C1 + EMEMBRANCER/P)                  REMEMBRANCER

10. Others think that this proverb admonisheth <the> guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company

"and its greatest breadth only 180"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"/P)                  "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"

11.
"Its surface is considerably less than that of Portugal"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and agreeably to this"/P)                  "and agreeably to this"

12.            <the> ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with <a> ferula to Bacchus

"its greatest length being not more than 250 English miles"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"/P)                  "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"

13.
"and its greatest breadth only 180"                 (th/C1 + "-ereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"/P)                  "thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"

14.               or apply <a> gentle and childish correction to <the> faults

"Its surface is considerably less than that of Portugal"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"/P)                  "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"

15.             This small area was divided among <a> number of independent states

"This small area was divided among number of independent states"                 (B/C1 + "-ut because you are of opinion"/P)                  "But because you are of opinion"

16.             many of them containing <a> territory of only <a> few square miles

"many of them containing territory of only few square miles"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "as Euripides says"/P)                  "as Euripides says"

17. that to forget absurdities is indeed <a> piece of wisdom --- and none of them larger than <an> English county

"and none of them larger than English county"                 (th/C1 + "-at to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"/P)                  "that to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom "

18. but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to <an> entertainment --- But <the> heroism and genius of <the> Greeks have given <an> interest to <the> insignificant spot of earth bearing their name

"But heroism and genius of Greeks have given interest to insignificant spot of earth bearing their name"                 (b/C1 + "-ut to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"/P)                  "but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"

19. but against <the> known practice of <the> greatest philosophers --- which <the> vastest empires have never equalled

"which vastest empires have never equalled"                 (b/C1 + "-ut against known practice of greatest philosophers"/P)                  "but against known practice of greatest philosophers"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   William Smith's  "SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME"   and  Plutarch's  "Symposiacs"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19694/19694-h/19694-h.htm ,    
HISTORY OF ROME.

CHAPTER I.
GEOGRAPHY OF ITALY—EARLY INHABITANTS.

Italy is the central one of the three great peninsulas which project from the south of Europe into the Mediterranean Sea. It is bounded on the north by the chain of the Alps, which form a natural barrier, and it is surrounded on other sides by the sea. Its shores are washed on the west by the "Mare Inferum," or the Lower Sea, and on the east by the Adriatic, called by the Romans the "Mare Superum," or the Upper Sea. It may be divided into two parts, the northern consisting of the great plain drained by the River Padus, or Po, and its tributaries, and the southern being a long tongue of land, with the Apennines as a back-bone running down[Pg 2] its whole extent from north to south.


"SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME"                 (W/C1 + "-illiam Smith's work"/P)/Ch                 "William Smith's work"

"SMALLER HISTORY OF ROME"                 (Sym/C1 + posiacs/P)/Ch                  Symposiacs


1.             from <the> earliest times to <the> Roman conquest.

"CHAPTER I/one"                      (Boo/C1 + "-k one"/P)/Ch                       "Book I/one"

2.
"GEOGRAPHY OF ITALY"                         (S/C1 + ome/P)/Ch                          Some

3.
"EARLY INHABITANTS"                 (my/C1 + "dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"/P)/Ch                  "my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"

4. Italy is <the> central one of <the> three great peninsulas which project from <the> south of Europe into <the> Mediterranean Sea --- was principally designed against <the> stewards of <a> feast

"Italy is central one of three great peninsulas which project from south of Europe into Mediterranean Sea"                 (w/C1 + "-as principally designed against stewards of feast"/P)/Ch                  "was principally designed against stewards of feast"

5. who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon <the> guests --- It is bounded on <the> north by <the> chain of <the> Alps

"It is bounded on north by chain of Alps"                 (wh/C1 + "-o are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"/P)/Ch                  "who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"

6.                For <the> Dorians in Sicily --- which form <a> natural barrier

"which form natural barrier"                 (F/C1 + "-or Dorians in Sicily"/P)/Ch                  "For Dorians in Sicily"

7.          and it is surrounded on other sides by <the> sea

"and it is surrounded on other sides by sea"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "as I am informed"/P)/Ch                  "as I am informed"

8.            called <the> steward --- Its shores are washed on <the> west by <the> "Mare Inferum,"

"Its shores are washed on west by "Mare Inferum,""                 (c/C1 + "-alled steward"/P)/Ch                  "called steward"

9.                <a> REMEMBRANCER --- or <the> Lower Sea

"or Lower Sea"                  (R/C1 + EMEMBRANCER/P)/Ch                    REMEMBRANCER

10. Others think that this proverb admonisheth <the> guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company --- and on <the> east by <the> Adriatic

"and on east by Adriatic"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"/P)/Ch                  "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"

11.              called by <the> Romans <the> "Mare Superum,"

"called by Romans "Mare Superum,""                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and agreeably to this"/P)/Ch                  "and agreeably to this"

12.    <the> ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with <a> ferula to Bacchus --- or the Upper Sea

"or Upper Sea"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"/P)/Ch                  "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"

13.
"It may be divided into two parts"                 (th/C1 + "-ereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"/P)/Ch                  "thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"

14. or apply <a> gentle and childish correction to <the> faults --- <the> northern consisting of <the> great plain drained by <the> River Padus

"northern consisting of great plain drained by River Padus"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"/P)/Ch                  "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"

15.
"or Po"                 (B/C1 + "-ut because you are of opinion"/P)/Ch                  "But because you are of opinion"

16.
"and its tributaries"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "as Euripides says"/P)/Ch                  "as Euripides says"

17. that to forget absurdities is indeed <a> piece of wisdom --- and <the> southern being <a> long tongue of land

"and southern being long tongue of land"                 (th/C1 + "-at to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"/P)/Ch                  "that to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"

18. but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to <an> entertainment --- with <the> Apennines as <a> back-bone running down

"with Apennines as back-bone running down"                 (b/C1 + "-ut to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"/P)/Ch                  "but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"

19. but against <the> known practice of <the> greatest philosophers

"Pg 2"                 (b/C1 + "-ut against known practice of greatest philosophers"/P)/Ch                  "but against known practice of greatest philosophers"

20.
"its whole extent from north to south"                 (f/C1 + "-or Plato"/P)/Ch                  "for Plato"

Et cetera.



Pausanias (geographer)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Pausanias+(geographer) ,    

* Plutarch  >>  ("Cassius Dio" /T/+cp)/P  >>  Dio /T  >>  "Dio Cassius" /P  >>  Dione /P/Ch  >>  "Lucius Cassius Dio Cocceianus" /S

Pausanias                       (C/GC/S/abT + "-assius Dio"/C2)                     "Cassius Dio"

"Description of Greece"                    (P/GC/S/abT + "-ausanias' work"/C2)/+cp                   "Pausanias' work"

"Description of Greece"                    (Sym/GC/S/abT + posiacs/C2)/+cp                   Symposiacs



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Pausanias'  "Description of Greece"   and  Plutarch's  "Symposiacs"


http://www.google.com/search?hl=ko&tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=inauthor:%22Pausanias%22 ,  
http://books.google.com/books?id=DsOe4IQYL0YC&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:%22Pausanias%22&hl=ko&ei=gC02TovkHOefmQXu0MTADg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQ6AEwAA ,    



DESCRIPTION
OF
GREECE,
BY
JPAUSANIAS

TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK,"
WITH NOTES,

In. which much of the Mythology of the Greeks is unfolded siiom
a Theory which has been for many Ages unknown.

AND UtOtTIAIED WITH
MAPS. AND VIEWS ELEGANTLY ENGRAVED.
IN THREE VOLUMES.
Vol. n.
Victa iacet Pietas.——
Ovid.
LONDON:
tRINTED FOR R. FAULDER, NEW BOND-STREET.
MDCCXCIV.

DESCRIPTION
/
GREECE.

BOOK V.
PRIOR ELIACS.

C HAP. I.

SlJCH of the Greeks as divide Peloponnesus into sive parts only, acknowledge it is necessary, that the Eleans and Arcadians must belong to that part which is possessed by the Arcadians; that the. second must be assigned to the Achaians; and that the three remaining parts must be distributed among the Dorienses. But the nations which dwell in Peloponnesus are the native Arcadians and Achaians. Of these the Achaians were expelled their country by the Dorienses, yet were not driven beyond Peloponnesus: but the Ionians, after they were expelled, inhabited that part of Greece which was formerly called Ægialus, but is now denominated from the Achaians. The Arcadians, however, from the sirst to the present time have possessed their own dominions; but the other parts have been inhabited by strangers. For the Corinthians of the present day are the most recent of all that dwell in Vol. II. B PeloPeloponnesus; and the period during which they hav»* possessed this land from a Roman emperor to the present day, is two hundred and seventeen years. The Dryopes too, and Dorienses came, the former from Parnassus, and the latter from beyond Peloponnesus. We also know that the Eleans came into this part from Calydon and the rest of Ætolia; the particulars of whofe antiquity are as follow: ~ ~


"Description of Greece"                    (Sym/GC/S/abT + posiacs/C2)/+cp                   Symposiacs

"Description Greece"                    (Sym/GC/S/abT + posiacs/C2)/Ch/+cp                   Symposiacs

1.
"BOOK V/five"                   (Boo/GC/S/abT + "-k I/One"/C2)/+cp                   "Book I/One"

2.
"PRIOR ELIACS"                         (S/GC/S/abT + ome/C2)/+cp                       Some

3.
"C HAP. I/One"                (my /GC/S/abT + "dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"/C2)/+cp                  "my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"

4. was principally designed against <the> stewards of <a> feast --- SlJCH of <the> Greeks as divide Peloponnesus into sive parts only

"SlJCH of Greeks as divide Peloponnesus into sive parts only"                 (w/GC/S/abT + "-as principally designed against stewards of feast"/C2)/+cp                 "was principally designed against stewards of feast"

5.              who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon <the> guests

"acknowledge it is necessary"                    (wh/GC/S/abT + "-o are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"/C2)/+cp                   "who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"

6. For <the> Dorians in Sicily --- that <the> Eleans and Arcadians must belong to that part which is possessed by <the> Arcadians

"that Eleans and Arcadians must belong to that part which is possessed by Arcadians"                    (F/GC/S/abT + "-or Dorians in Sicily"/C2)/+cp                   "For Dorians in Sicily"

7.               that the

that                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "as I am informed"/C2)/+cp                   "as I am informed"

8.               called <the> steward --- second must be assigned to <the> Achaians

"second must be assigned to Achaians"                    (c/GC/S/abT + "-alled steward"/C2)/+cp                   "called steward"

9. <a> REMEMBRANCER --- and that <the> three remaining parts must be distributed among <the> Dorienses

"and that three remaining parts must be distributed among Dorienses"                    (R/GC/S/abT + EMEMBRANCER/C2)/+cp                   REMEMBRANCER

10. Others think that this proverb admonisheth <the> guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company --- But <the> nations which dwell in Peloponnesus are <the> native Arcadians and Achaians

"But nations which dwell in Peloponnesus are native Arcadians and Achaians"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"/C2)/+cp                   "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"

11.              Of these <the> Achaians were expelled their country by <the> Dorienses

"Of these Achaians were expelled their country by Dorienses"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and agreeably to this"/C2)/+cp                   "and agreeably to this"

12.            <the> ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with <a> ferula to Bacchus

"yet were not driven beyond Peloponnesus"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"/C2)/+cp                   "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"

13.               but <the> Ionians

"but Ionians"                    (th/GC/S/abT + "-ereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"/C2)/+cp                   "thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"

14.               or apply <a> gentle and childish correction to <the> faults

"after they were expelled"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"/C2)/+cp                   "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"

15.
"inhabited that part of Greece which was formerly called Ægialus"                    (B/GC/S/abT + "-ut because you are of opinion"/C2)/+cp                   "But because you are of opinion"

16.                  but is now denominated from <the> Achaians

"but is now denominated from Achaians"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "as Euripides says"/C2)/+cp                   "as Euripides says"

17.            that to forget absurdities is indeed <a> piece of wisdom --- <The> Arcadians

Arcadians                    (th/GC/S/abT + "-at to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"/C2)/+cp                   "that to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"

18. but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to <an> entertainment

however                    (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"/C2)/+cp                   "but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"

19. but against <the> known practice of <the> greatest philosophers --- from <the> sirst to <the> present time have possessed their own dominions

"from sirst to present time have possessed their own dominions"                    (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut against known practice of greatest philosophers"/C2)/+cp                   "but against known practice of greatest philosophers"

20.                   but the other parts have been inhabited by strangers

"but other parts have been inhabited by strangers"                    (f/GC/S/abT + "-or Plato"/C2)/+cp                   "for Plato"

21.            For <the> Corinthians of <the> present day are <the> most recent of all that dwell in Vol

"For Corinthians of present day are most recent of all that dwell in Vol"                    (X/GC/S/abT + enophon/C2)/+cp                   Xenophon

22.
"II/two"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Aristotle/C2)/+cp                     Aristotle

23.
"B PeloPeloponnesus"                    (S/GC/S/abT + peusippus/C2)/+cp                   Speusippus

24.                  and <the> period during which they hav»*

"and period during which they hav»*"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Epicurus/C2)/+cp                   Epicurus

25.            possessed this land from <a> Roman emperor to <the> present day

"possessed this land from Roman emperor to present day"                    (Pry/GC/S/abT + tanis/C2)/+cp                   Prytanis

26.
"is two hundred and seventeen years"                    (H/GC/S/abT + ieronymus/C2)/+cp                   Hieronymus

27.              Dion <the> Academic --- <The> Dryopes too

"Dryopes too"                    (D/GC/S/abT + "-ion Academic"/C2)/+cp                   "Dion Academic"

Et cetera.



Marcus Aurelius
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Marcus+Aurelius ,  

*        While taking Korea/충청-도 [cuŋ  cΛŋ  do/province] (dialect) speaking posture (as coarticulation posture);   if articulating (or trying to speak) "Buddha" or "석가모니 [sΛg  ga  mo  ni]"   (or Siddhārtha Gautama, Siddhattha Gotama   or   Kassapa Buddha    or   revolutionary, pioneer, innovator, groundbreaker, or mastermind)  or  "Washington"  from Korea/전라-도 [zΛn  la  do/province] (dialect) /S speaking posture,     "Homer [Ho  me  r=]/+bp"   or   "Lucian [Lu  ci  ŋa  n=]/+cp"   or  "Menander [Me  na  n=  de  r=]/+bp/Ch"  or  "Pindar [Pi  n=  da  r=]/+cp/Ch"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

"Marcus Aurelius"                              (H/S + omer/P)                               Homer

Reign                   8 March 161–169 (with Lucius Verus);              169–177 (alone);
                      177–March 180 (with Commodus)            (19 years, 9 days)

Full name                  Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus
Born            26 April 121                 Birthplace  Rome
Died           17 March 180     Place of death  Vindobona or Sirmium   Buried   Hadrian's Mausoleum

>>       Antoninus, Aurelius, Marcus Annius Verus, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

* "Marcus Aurelius"  >>  Aurelius /C2  >>  Antoninus /GC/S/abT  >>  "Marcus Aurelius Antoninus" /T  >>  "Marcus Annius Verus" /P  >>  "Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus" /S

"121"                       (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/P)/+bp                     "Marcus Aurelius"
April                     (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/P)/Ch/+bp                    "Marcus Aurelius"
"8"                          (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/P)/+cp                     "Marcus Aurelius"
Rome                     (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/P)/Ch/+cp                   "Marcus Aurelius"

"180"                       (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/+bp                     "Marcus Aurelius"
March                     (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/Ch/+bp                   "Marcus Aurelius"
"17"                        (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/+cp                     "Marcus Aurelius"
Vindobona                 (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/Ch/+cp                  "Marcus Aurelius"
Sirmium                (M/GC/S/abT + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/Ch/+cp              "Marcus Aurelius"
"Hadrian's Mausoleum"                (M/S + "-arcus Aurelius"/T)/Ch/+cp               "Marcus Aurelius"

* "Marcus Aurelius"  >>  ("161" /S)/P  >>  (March /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("8" /T)/P  >>  ("169" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Lucius Verus" /GC/S/abT)/P  >>  ("169" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P  >>  ("177" /C2)/P  >>  ("180" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  (March /S)/T  >>  (Commodus /S/Ch)/T

>>         He was the last of the "Five Good Emperors",

*               "Marcus Aurelius"  >>  ("Five Good Emperors" /T/Ch)/P

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Five+Good+Emperors ,    
Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius

*    (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, or "Marcus Aurelius")  >>  ("Five Good Emperors" /T/Ch)/P

>>          Marcus Aurelius' work Meditations

Meditations                (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius' writing"/T)                  "Marcus Aurelius' writing"
Meditations                         (Sym/C2 + posiacs/T)/+cp                          Symposiacs



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Marcus Aurelius'  Meditations   and  Plutarch's  "Symposiacs"

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/symposiacs/ ,    

Symposiacs, by Plutarch
Book I.

Some, my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence, [Greek omitted] was principally designed against the stewards of a feast, who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon the guests. For the Dorians in Sicily (as I am informed) called the steward, [Greek omitted] a REMEMBRANCER. Others think that this proverb admonisheth the guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company; and agreeably to this, the ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with a ferula to Bacchus, thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company, or apply a gentle and childish correction to the faults. But because you are of opinion (as Euripides says) that to forget absurdities is indeed a piece of wisdom, ~ ~

http://classics.mit.edu//Antoninus/meditations.1.one.html ,    
The Meditations
By Marcus Aurelius
Written 167 A.C.E.
Translated by George Long

    Table of Contents

Book One      

From my grandfather Verus I learned good morals and the government of my temper.

From the reputation and remembrance of my father, modesty and a manly character.

From my mother, piety and beneficence, and abstinence, not only from evil deeds, but even from evil thoughts; and further, simplicity in my way of living, far removed from the habits of the rich.

From my great-grandfather, not to have frequented public schools, and to have had good teachers at home, and to know that on such things a man should spend liberally. ~ ~


Meditations                (M/C2 + "-arcus Aurelius' writing"/T)                  "Marcus Aurelius' writing"
Meditations                         (Sym/C2 + posiacs/T)/+cp                          Symposiacs

1.
Book                                   (B/C2 + ook/T)/+cp                                    Book

2.
one                                 ([ŋ=  w]/C2 + one/T)/+cp                                  one

3.
From                                   (S/C2 + ome/T)/+cp                                  Some

4.
my                                        (m/C2 + y/T)/+cp                                     my

5.
grandfather                               (d/C2 + ear/T)/+cp                                  dear

6.
Verus                                   (S/C2 + ossius/T)/+cp                              Sossius

7.
"I/First"                                (S/C2 + enecio/T)/+cp                              Senecio

8.
learned                          ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + imagine/T)/+cp                           imagine

9.
good                                      (th/C2 + at/T)/+cp                                   that

10.
morals                                    (th/C2 + is/T)/+cp                                    this

Et cetera    as below.

From - (Some) -- my - (my) -- grandfather - (dear) -- Verus - (Sossius) -- I/First - (Senecio) -- learned - (imagine) -- good - (that) -- morals - (this) -- and - (sentence) -- <the> government - (was) -- of - (principally) -- my - (designed) -- temper - (against) --.

From - (<the> stewards) -- <the> reputation - (of) -- and - (<a> feast) -- remembrance - (who) -- of - (are) -- my - (usually) -- father - (troublesome) --, modesty - (and) -- and - (press) -- <a> manly - (liquor) -- character - (too) --.

From - (much) -- my - (upon) -- mother - (<the> guests) --, piety - (For) -- and - (<the> Dorians) -- beneficence - (in) --, and - (Sicily) -- abstinence - (as) --, not - (I) -- only - (am) -- from - (informed) -- evil - (called) -- deeds - (<the> steward) --, but - (<a> REMEMBRANCER) -- even - (Others) -- from - (think) -- evil - (that this) -- thoughts - (proverb) --; and - (admonisheth) -- further - (<the> guests to) --, simplicity - (forget) -- in - (everything) -- my - (that is) -- way - (spoken) -- of - (or done) -- living - (in company) --, far - (and agreeably) -- removed - (to this) -- from - (<the> ancients) -- <the> habits - (used to) -- of <the> rich - (consecrate) --.

From - (forgetfulness) -- my - (with <a> ferula) -- great-grandfather - (to Bacchus) --, not to - (thereby) -- have - (intimating) -- frequented - (that we) -- public - (should either) -- schools - (not remember) --, and - (any irregularity) -- to have - (committed in) -- had - (mirth) -- good - (and company) -- teachers - (or apply) -- at - (<a> gentle and) -- home - (childish) --, and - (correction to) -- to know - (<the> faults) -- that - (But because) -- on - (you are) -- such - (of opinion) -- things - (as Euripides) -- <a> man - (says) -- should - (that to forget) -- spend - (absurdities) -- liberally - (is indeed) --.

Et cetera.



Diogenes Laërtius
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Diogenes+La%c3%abrtius ,  

"Diogenes Laërtius"                        (P/GC/S/abT + lutarch/T)                        Plutarch


"Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers"                    (D/P + "-iogenes Laërtius' work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Diogenes Laërtius' work"

"Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers"                    (Symp/P + osiacs/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Symposiacs



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Diogenes Laërtius'  "Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers"   and  Plutarch's  "Symposiacs"

http://classicpersuasion.org/pw/diogenes/ ,  
http://classicpersuasion.org/pw/diogenes/dlintro.htm ,    

BOOK I.
INTRODUCTION.

I. SOME say that the study of philosophy originated with the barbarians. In that among the Persians there existed the Magi,1 and among the Babylonians or Assyrians the Chaldaei,2 among the Indians the Gymnosophistae,3 and among the Celts and Gauls men who were called Druids4 and Semnothei, as Aristotle relates in his book on Magic, and Sotion in the twenty-third book of his Succession of Philosophers. Besides those men there were the Phoenician Ochus, the Thracian Zamolxis,5 and the Libyan Atlas. For the Egyptians say that Vulcan was the son of Nilus*, and that he was the author of philosophy, in which those who were especially eminent were called his priests and prophets.

II. From his age to that of Alexander, king of the Macedonians, were forty-eight thousand eight hundred and sixty-three years, and during this time there were three hundred and seventy-three eclipses of the sun, and eight hundred and thirty-two eclipses of the moon.


"Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers"                    (Symp/P + osiacs/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Symposiacs


1.
BOOK                          (B/P + OOK/GC/S/abT)/+cp                         "BOOK I/One"

2.
"I/One"                         (S/P + ome/GC/S/abT)/+cp                                Some

3.
INTRODUCTION                   ("my d"/P + "-ear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "my dear Sossius Senecio imagine that this sentence"

4. was principally designed against <the> stewards of <a> feast --- SOME say that <the> study of philosophy originated with <the> barbarians

"SOME say that study of philosophy originated with barbarians"                   (w/P + "-as principally designed against stewards of feast"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "was principally designed against stewards of feast"

"I/First"                   (w/P + "-as principally designed against stewards of feast"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  "was principally designed against stewards of feast"

5. who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon <the> guests --- In that among <the> Persians there existed <the> Magi

"In that among Persians there existed Magi"                   (wh/P + "-o are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "who are usually troublesome and press liquor too much upon guests"

6.               For <the> Dorians in Sicily

"1/one"                   (F/P + "-or Dorians in Sicily"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "For Dorians in Sicily"

7.              and among <the> Babylonians or Assyrians <the> Chaldaei

"and among Babylonians or Assyrians Chaldaei"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as I am informed"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "as I am informed"

8.               called <the> steward

"2/two"                   (c/P + "-alled steward"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "called steward"

9.               a REMEMBRANCER --- among <the> Indians <the> Gymnosophistae

"among Indians Gymnosophistae"                   (R/P + EMEMBRANCER/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  REMEMBRANCER

10. Others think that this proverb admonisheth <the> guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company

"3/three"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Others think that this proverb admonisheth guests to forget everything that is spoken or done in company"

11.                and among <the> Celts and Gauls men who were called Druids

"and among Celts and Gauls men who were called Druids"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and agreeably to this"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "and agreeably to this"

12. <the> ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with <a> ferula to Bacchus

"4/four"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "ancients used to consecrate forgetfulness with ferula to Bacchus"

13.
"and Semnothei"                   (th/P + "-ereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "thereby intimating that we should either not remember any irregularity committed in mirth and company"

14.               or apply <a> gentle and childish correction to <the> faults

"as Aristotle relates in his book on Magic"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "or apply gentle and childish correction to faults"

15.               and Sotion in <the> twenty-third book of his Succession of Philosophers

"and Sotion in twenty-third book of his Succession of Philosophers"                   (B/P + "-ut because you are of opinion"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "But because you are of opinion"

16.              Besides those men there were <the> Phoenician Ochus

"Besides those men there were Phoenician Ochus"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as Euripides says"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "as Euripides says"

17.              that to forget absurdities is indeed <a> piece of wisdom --- the Thracian Zamolxis

"Thracian Zamolxis"                   (th/P + "-at to forget absurdities is indeed piece of wisdom"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "that to forget absurdities is indeed a piece of wisdom"

18. but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to <an> entertainment

"5/five"                   (b/P + "-ut to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "but to deliver over to oblivion all sort of discourse that merry meetings do usually produce is not only repugnant to that endearing quality that most allow to entertainment"

19.    but against <the> known practice of <the> greatest philosophers --- and <the> Libyan Atlas

"and Libyan Atlas"                   (b/P + "-ut against known practice of greatest philosophers"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "but against <the> known practice of greatest philosophers"

20.                  For <the> Egyptians say that Vulcan was <the> son of Nilus*

"For Egyptians say that Vulcan was son of Nilus*"                   (f/P + "-or Plato"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "for Plato"

21.               and that he was <the> author of philosophy

"and that he was author of philosophy"                   (X/P + enophon/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Xenophon

22.
"in which those who were especially eminent were called his priests and prophets"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristotle/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Aristotle

23.
"From his age to that of Alexander"                   (Sp/P + eusippus/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Speusippus
"II/Second"                   (Sp/P + eusippus/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  Speusippus

24.                    king of <the> Macedonians

"king of Macedonians"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Epicurus/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Epicurus

25.
"were forty-eight thousand eight hundred and sixty-three years"                   (Pryt/P + anis/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Prytanis

26.              and during this time there were three hundred and seventy-three eclipses of <the> sun

"and during this time there were three hundred and seventy-three eclipses of sun"                   (H/P + ieronymus/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Hieronymus

27.              Dion <the> Academic --- and eight hundred and thirty-two eclipses of <the> moon

"and eight hundred and thirty-two eclipses of moon"                   (D/P + "-ion Academic"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Dion Academic"

Et cetera.