SUBJECT: punctuality, promptness, read(il)y, regular(ity), stead(il)y, consistent(ly),  'Kindly yours',  '(double) genitive'
NAME: Young-Won Kim
DATE: 2009.09.04 - 00:45
11.         punctual(ity)  

*    When speak/articulating       "punctuality"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "punctual"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "punctuality"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "punctually"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


12.        prompt(ness)

*    When speak/articulating       "promptness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "prompt"   (of adjective)    is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "promptness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "promptly"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "promptly"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "promptitude"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


13.       read(il)y,         readiness

*    When speak/articulating       "readiness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "ready"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "readiness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "readily"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


14.       regular(ity)

*    When speak/articulating       "regularity"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "regular"   (of adjective)  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularity"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "regularly"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularly"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/abR speaking posture,      "regular"   (of noun)    is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularly"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "regulars"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regular"   (of noun)    with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "regularize"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regular"   (of noun)    with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "regularized"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularized"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "regularizes"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularized"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/abT speaking posture,      "regularizing"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "regularizing"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "regularization"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


15.       stead(il)y,          steadiness

*    When speak/articulating       "steadiness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "steady"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "steadiness"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "steadily"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "steadily"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/abT speaking posture,      "steadier"   (of noun)  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


16.       consistent(ly).       consistency

Re:     Article of   "'=Λi*a/o/u'   comprise/consist, fair(ly), 'fair up/off', 'mild (down)', pretty/very, unawarely, (un)aware-of"          <<Column 4.  comprise/consist>>

*    When speak/articulating       "consistency"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "consistent"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consistency"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "consistence"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consistency"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "consistently"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consistently"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/abT speaking posture,      "consist"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consistent"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "consist with"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consist"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "consisted"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consist"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "consists"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consists"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /S/Ch/abT speaking posture,      "consisting"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "consisted"        with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/abT speaking posture,      "consists of"  is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


17.        Kindly yours.

Re:      Article of   "verity, truth,  'the true',  factuality, tru(thful)ly,     'Sincerely yours', media blitz, clear/whole/H? wholeness"           <<Column 28.  Sincerely yours.  (Yours sincerely.)>>

kind                            (sin/P + cere/C1)                        sincere

thankful                        (sin/T + cere/S)                         sincere

truthful                         (sin/S + cere/C1)                        sincere


18.         (double) possessive/genitive

Re:     Article of    "seldom/sure,  why not aux. v.?  Verbal,  go (a)fishing,  “be to”  afire,  mine/yours,  phrase"         <<Column 5.  Possessive case pronouns;  mine, yours, hers, ours, theirs, etc.>>

*    When speak/articulating       "possessive"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "genitive" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/double+genitive ,  
double genitive
n.
A phrasal construction in English in which possession is indicated by the word of followed by the possessive form of a noun or pronoun, as in   a relative of mine   or   a friend of Pat's.    Also called double possessive. See Usage Note at of.

*    When speak/articulating       "my  one  relative"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "a relative of mine" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "my relatives"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "relatives of mine" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


*    When speak/articulating       "Pat's  one  friend"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "a friend of Pat's" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

When speak/articulating       "Pat's friends"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,      "friends of Pat's" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


mine                (my/C1/Ch + thing/S/Ch)                     "my thing"

mine                (my/P/Ch + things/C2/Ch)                    "my things"


mine                (my/P/Ch + partner/S/Ch)                     "my partner"

mine                (my/C1/Ch + partners/T/Ch)                  "my partners"


yours/sing.          (your/P/Ch + book/C2/Ch)                     "your book"

yours/sing.          (your/T/Ch + books/S/Ch)                     "your books"

yours/sing.          (your/C1/Ch + village/T/Ch)                    "your village"


yours/sing.          (your/C1/Ch + lover/P/Ch)                     "your lover"

yours/sing.          (your/P/Ch + lovers/S/Ch)                      "your lovers"

yours/sing.          (your/S/Ch + teacher/P/Ch)                    "your teacher"

yours/sing.          (your/P/Ch + teachers/C2/Ch)                  "your teachers"


his                  (his/T/Ch + hat/S/Ch)                          "his hat"

his                  (his/S/Ch + hats/P/Ch)                         "his hats"


his                  (his/P/Ch + friend/S/Ch)                        "his friend"

his                  (his/C1/Ch + friends/T/Ch)                      "his friends"


hers                (her/C1/Ch + pen/T/Ch)                         "her pen"

hers                (her/S/Ch + pens/P/Ch)                         "her pens"


hers                (her/S/Ch + sister/P/Ch)                        "her sister"

hers                (her/T/Ch + sisters/C2/Ch)                      "her sisters"


its                  (its/S/Ch + part/T/Ch)                           "its part"

its                  (its/S/Ch + ingredients/T/Ch)                    "its ingredients"


its                  (its/C1/Ch + employee/P/Ch)                    "its employee"

its                  (its/T/Ch + employees/P/Ch)                    "its employees"


ours                (our/P/Ch + plan/C2/Ch)                         "our plan"

ours                (our/C1/Ch + plans/S/Ch)                        "our plans"


ours                (our/P/Ch + supporter/S/Ch)                      "our supporter"

ours                (our/C1/Ch + supporters/T/Ch)                   "our supporters"


yours/pl.            (your/P/Ch + village/C2/Ch)                       "your village"

yours/pl.            (your/C1/Ch + villages/P/Ch)                      "your villages"

yours/pl.            (your/P/Ch + books/C2/Ch)                        "your books"


yours/pl.            (your/P/Ch + teacher/T/Ch)                       "your teacher"

yours/pl.            (your/S/Ch + teachers/C2/Ch)                     "your teachers"


theirs               (their/C1/Ch + country/P/Ch)                      "their country"

theirs               (their/T/Ch + countries/S/Ch)                      "their countries"


theirs               (their/S/Ch + manager/T/Ch)                      "their manager"

theirs               (their/C1/Ch + managers/P/Ch)                      "their managers"


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Mine ,    
Our Living Language           In Standard English, most possessive pronouns have different forms   when used as nouns, or nominals, as in   That book is yours,   than when used as adjectives, as in   That is your book.            The two exceptions are his and its,   which retain the same form in both usages.          The nominal forms all end in -s  except for mine.        In some Southern U.S. and New England vernacular dialects,  all nominal possessive pronouns end in -n,   just like mine, as in   That book is hern  (but not "That's hern book")   and   Those cookies are ourn.           Although forms such as hisn and hern are highly socially stigmatized,   from a strictly linguistic standpoint   these forms reflect a natural phenomenon in the development of all languages and dialects:    Irregular patterns tend to be regularized, thereby eliminating exceptions to language "rules."           Further, hisn, hern, ourn, yourn, and theirn have a long history in English.          They arose in the Middle English period   (c. 1100-1500)   by analogy with mine and thine,   forms that are older than my and thy   and that can be traced to Old English (c. 449-1100).           Originally, my and thy were used before nouns beginning with consonant sounds, as in   my book,     while mine and thine were used before nouns beginning with vowel sounds, as in   mine eyes  as a and an still are.          This distinction persisted into the 18th century.            But as nominal pronouns,  mine and thine remained unchanged.           This invariant use of -n led to its use for all nominal possessive pronouns   (except its,  which usually is not used nominally, as in  That book is its).             In fact, these -n forms may be older than the current standard -s forms,    which arose late in the Middle English period, by analogy to his.         Most likely, hern, ourn, yourn, and theirn originated somewhere in the central area of southern England,   since they can still be found throughout many parts of that region.           In the United States, the forms appear to be increasingly confined to older speakers in relatively isolated areas,   indicating that these features are at last fading from use.        In some Southern-based vernacular dialects,   particularly African American Vernacular English,   the irregular standard English pattern for nominal possessive forms has been regularized by adding -s to mine, as in   That book is mines.           See Note at an 1.


nominal/n.                        (no/C2 + un/T)                        noun

nominal/adj.                      (noun/T + 's/C1)                      noun's


>>     hisn, hern, ourn, yourn, and theirn

*    When speak/articulating       "his",      "her",        "our",         "your",     or        "their"     with/from GRECOnglish/GC /P/Ch/abR speaking posture,     respectively    "hisn",        "hern",       "ourn",        "yourn",      or       "theirn"        is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


>>     mine eyes

*    When articulating       "my eyes"        (as one word;    that is, continuously,  without pause)     with/from English /S speaking posture,      "mine eyes" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.


>>    That book is mines.

mines                      (ma/P + in/T)                      mine [ma  in]