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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | brd2 | Kor | book | FUN member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, main :::


596 12 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   Torricelli, Bernoulli, 'Jean le Rond d'Alembert', Diderot, 'Ephraim Chambers', 'Pierre Bayle', 'Laurence Sterne'
Torricelli, 'Daniel Bernoulli', 'Jean le Rond d'Alembert', Diderot, 'Ephraim Chambers', 'Pierre Bayle', 'Laurence Sterne'


Evangelista Torricelli
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Evangelista+Torricelli ,    

* "John Wallis"  >>  "John Brehaut Wallis" /P  >>  ("François Viète" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("William Holder" /C2)/P  >>  ("William Oughtred" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("number line" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Blaise Pascal" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("William Neile" /P)/S  >>  (Torricelli /P/Ch)/S

*                  Torricelli  >>  "Evangelista Torricelli" /C2

Born                      October 15, 1608                          Faenza, Romagna, Italy
Died                  October 25, 1647 (aged 39)                           Florence

"1608"                              (T/P + orricelli/S)/+bp                                 Torricelli
October                             (T/P + orricelli/S)/+cp                                 Torricelli
"15th"                             (T/P + orricelli/S)/Ch/+bp                               Torricelli
"Faenza, Romagna, Italy"                    (T/P + orricelli/S)/Ch/+cp                     Torricelli

"1647"                             (T/T + orricelli/S)/+bp                                  Torricelli
October                            (T/T + orricelli/S)/+cp                                  Torricelli
"25th"                             (T/T + orricelli/S)/Ch/+bp                               Torricelli
Florence                            (T/T + orricelli/S)/Ch/+cp                              Torricelli

>>               Torricelli's chief invention was the mercury barometer

"mercury barometer"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Evangelista Torricelli"/T)                 "Evangelista Torricelli"

>>           the Torr, a unit used in vacuum measurements, was named for him.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Torr ,    

*              "760"  >>  ("Torr" /S)/P

>>          Torricelli also discovered Torricelli's Law, regarding the speed of a fluid flowing out of an opening, which was later shown to be a particular case of Bernoulli's principle.

"Torricelli's Law"                            (fl/C2 + uid/GC/S/abT)                             fluid

"Daniel Bernoulli"              ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Evangelista Torricelli"/GC/S/abT)                 "Evangelista Torricelli"

>>     Selected works

•    Trattato del moto (before 1641)
•    Opera geometrica (1644)
•    Lezioni accademiche (printed 1715)
•    Esperienza dell'argento vivo (Berlin, 1897).

"Trattato del moto"                     (T/P + "-orricelli's work"/S)                   "Torricelli's work"

*             "Trattato del moto"  >>  ("before 1641" /GC/S/abT)/C2

"Opera geometrica"                     (T/P + "-orricelli's work"/C2)                   "Torricelli's work"
"Lezioni accademiche"                     (T/P + "-orricelli's work"/GC/S/abT)                   "Torricelli's work"
"Esperienza dell'argento vivo"                     (T/P + "-orricelli's work"/T)                   "Torricelli's work"

*             "Opera geometrica"  >>  ("1644" /GC/S/abT)/C2
*             "Lezioni accademiche"  >>  ("printed 1715" /GC/S/abT)/C2
*             "Esperienza dell'argento vivo"  >>  ("Berlin, 1897" /GC/S/abT)/C2



Daniel Bernoulli
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Daniel+Bernoulli ,      

"Daniel Bernoulli"              ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Evangelista Torricelli"/GC/S/abT)                 "Evangelista Torricelli"

*               "Daniel Bernoulli"  >>  Bernoulli /P  >>  Daniel /P/Ch

>>             Groningen, January 29, 1700 – July 27, 1782

Groningen                    (D/C2 + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/+bp                   "Daniel Bernoulli"
"1700"                       (D/C2 + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/+cp                    "Daniel Bernoulli"
January                    (D/C2 + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Daniel Bernoulli"
"29th"                    (D/C2 + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/Ch/+cp                   "Daniel Bernoulli"

"1782"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/+bp                 "Daniel Bernoulli"
July                     (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/+cp                  "Daniel Bernoulli"
"27th"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli"/S)/Ch                  "Daniel Bernoulli"

>>      His earliest mathematical work was the Exercitationes (Mathematical Exercises), published in 1724 (the Riccati equation).

"Mathematical Exercises"                (D/S + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/GC/S/abT)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*       "Mathematical Exercises"  >>  Exercitationes /T  >>  "1724" /T/Ch  >>  ("Riccati equation" /T)/S


>>       Hydrodynamique (Hydrodynamica), published in 1738

Hydrodynamique                 (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C2)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*                      Hydrodynamique  >>  Hydrodynamica /T  >>  "1738" /T/Ch

>>        it resembles Joseph Louis Lagrange's Méchanique Analytique in being arranged so that all the results are consequences of a single principle, namely, conservation of energy.

*               "Daniel Bernoulli"  >>  ("Joseph Louis Lagrange" /C2)/GC/S/abT

>>        This was followed by a memoir on the theory of the tides, to which, conjointly with the memoirs by Euler and Colin Maclaurin, a prize was awarded by the French Academy: these three memoirs contain all that was done on this subject between the publication of Isaac Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica and the investigations of Pierre-Simon Laplace.

"memoir on theory of tides"                 (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/P)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*     "memoir on theory of tides"  >>  "French Academy" /T  >>  Euler /T/Ch  >>  ("Colin Maclaurin" /T)/S

>>         Bernoulli also wrote a large number of papers on various mechanical questions, especially on problems connected with vibrating strings, and the solutions given by Brook Taylor and by Jean le Rond d'Alembert.

"on problems connected with vibrating strings"                (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

"on various mechanical questions"                (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*        "on problems connected with vibrating strings"  >>  "Jean le Rond d'Alembert" /T

*        "on various mechanical questions"  >>  "Brook Taylor" /T

>>       in 1738 of Specimen theoriae novae de mensura sortis (Exposition of a New Theory on the Measurement of Risk),[4] in which the St. Petersburg paradox was the base of the economic theory of risk aversion, risk premium and utility.[

"Exposition of New Theory on Measurement of Risk"                 (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/S)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*     "Exposition of New Theory on Measurement of Risk"  >>  "Specimen theoriae novae de mensura sortis" /T  >>  "St. Petersburg paradox" /T/Ch  >>  ("1738" /T)/S

>>      One of the earliest attempts to analyse a statistical problem involving censored data was Bernoulli's 1766 analysis of smallpox morbidity and mortality data to demonstrate the efficacy of vaccination

"analysis of smallpox morbidity and mortality data to demonstrate efficacy of vaccination"                 (D/T + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/S)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*     "analysis of smallpox morbidity and mortality data to demonstrate efficacy of vaccination"  >>  "1766" /T

>>       He worked with Euler on elasticity and the development of the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation.[7] Bernoulli's principle is of critical use in aerodynamics.

"on elasticity"                 (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*             "on elasticity"  >>  Euler /T

"development of Euler-Bernoulli beam equation"                 (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/S)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"



Joseph Louis Lagrange
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joseph+Louis+Lagrange ,    

*               "Daniel Bernoulli"  >>  ("Joseph Louis Lagrange" /C2)/GC/S/abT

Fourier                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-oseph Louis Lagrange"/C2)                "Joseph Louis Lagrange"


Joseph Fourier
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joseph+Fourier ,    

Fourier                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-oseph Louis Lagrange"/C2)                "Joseph Louis Lagrange"


Colin Maclaurin
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Colin+Maclaurin ,      

"memoir on theory of tides"                 (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/P)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

"     "memoir on theory of tides"  >>  "French Academy" /T  >>  Euler /T/Ch  >>  ("Colin Maclaurin" /T)/S


Euler
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Euler ,  

"memoir on theory of tides"                 (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/P)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

"     "memoir on theory of tides"  >>  "French Academy" /T  >>  Euler /T/Ch  >>  ("Colin Maclaurin" /T)/S



Brook Taylor
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Brook+Taylor ,      

"on problems connected with vibrating strings"                (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"
"on various mechanical questions"                (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*        "on problems connected with vibrating strings"  >>  "Jean le Rond d'Alembert" /T
*        "on various mechanical questions"  >>  "Brook Taylor" /T



Jean le Rond d'Alembert
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Jean+le+Rond+d'Alembert ,  

"on problems connected with vibrating strings"                (D/P + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"
"on various mechanical questions"                (D/GC/S/abT + "-aniel Bernoulli's work"/C1)                "Daniel Bernoulli's work"

*        "on problems connected with vibrating strings"  >>  "Jean le Rond d'Alembert" /T
*        "on various mechanical questions"  >>  "Brook Taylor" /T


*         "Jean le Rond d'Alembert" /T  >>  "d'Alembert" /T/Ch  >>  "Jean-Baptiste le Rond d'Alembert" /P


Born                                 16 November 1717                                   Paris
Died                                 29 October 1783 (aged 65)

"1717"                 (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/+bp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"
November                (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/+cp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"
"16th"                 (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"
Paris                 (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"

"1783"                 (J/P + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/+bp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"
October                 (J/P + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/+cp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"
"29th"                 (J/P + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert"/C2)/Ch                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert"

>>                    co-editor with Denis Diderot of the Encyclopédie.

Diderot                            (d'/P + Alembert/GC/S/abT)                           d'Alembert

Encyclopédie                (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert's work"/C2)/+cp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert's work"
"co-editor"                (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert's work"

Encyclopédie                   (D/S + "-iderot's work"/C2)/+cp                    "Diderot's work"
"co-editor"                    (D/S + "-iderot's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                  "Diderot's work"



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   "Encyclopédie, English"      and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

Encyclopédie                     (P/T + "-arallel Lives"/C2)/+cp                     "Parallel Lives"
Encyclopédie                     (P/S + "-arallel Lives"/C2)/+cp                     "Parallel Lives"

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/title_plate/A.html ,    

"Agriculture and Rural Economy"                   (Th/T + eseus/C2)/+cp                  Theseus
"Agriculture and Rural Economy"                   (Th/S + eseus/C2)/+cp                 Theseus

"Plate I/One"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "As geographers"/C2)/+cp                  "As geographers"
"Plate I/One"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As geographers"/C2)/+cp                  "As geographers"

"Rural Economy"                           (S/T + osius/C2)/+cp                            Sosius
"Rural Economy"                           (S/S + osius/C2)/+cp                            Sosius

Charcoal                   (cr/T + "-owd into edges of their maps parts of world which they do not know about"/C2)/+cp                  "crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about"

Charcoal                   (cr/S + "-owd into edges of their maps parts of world which they do not know about"/C2)/+cp                  "crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about"



Denis Diderot
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Denis+Diderot ,    

Diderot                            (d'/P + Alembert/GC/S/abT)                           d'Alembert

*                         Diderot  >>  "Denis Diderot" /P

Full name                             Denis Diderot
Born                                 5 October 1713                                Langres, France
Died                              31 July 1784 (aged 70)                              Paris, France

"1713"                               (D/P + iderot/S)/+bp                                  Diderot
October                              (D/P + iderot/S)/+cp                                  Diderot
"5th"                               (D/P + iderot/S)/Ch/+bp                                Diderot
"Langres, France"                          (D/P + iderot/S)/Ch/+cp                         Diderot

"1784"                            (D/P + iderot/GC/S/abT)/+bp                             Diderot
July                               (D/P + iderot/GC/S/abT)/+cp                             Diderot
"31st"                           (D/P + iderot/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                           Diderot
"Paris, France"                       (D/P + iderot/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                       Diderot

>>        best-known for serving as co-founder and chief editor of and contributor to the Encyclopédie.

*        "Denis Diderot" /P  >>  ("co-founder" /C2)/P  >>  ("chief editor" /GC/S/abT)/P  >>  (contributor /S)/P

>>          Jacques le fataliste et son maître (Jacques the Fatalist and his Master), which emulated Laurence Sterne in challenging conventions regarding novels and their structure and content, while also examining philosophical ideas about free will

"Jacques Fatalist and his Master"                   (D/S + "-iderot's work"/C2)                    "Diderot's work"

"Laurence Sterne"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/P)                  "Denis Diderot"

"challenging conventions regarding novels"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-acques Fatalist and his Master"/S)                 "Jacques Fatalist and his Master"
"structure and content"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-acques Fatalist and his Master"/S)/Ch                 "Jacques Fatalist and his Master"

"examining philosophical ideas"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-acques Fatalist and his Master"/T)                 "Jacques Fatalist and his Master"
"free will"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-acques Fatalist and his Master"/T)/Ch                 "Jacques Fatalist and his Master"

>>            dialogue, Le Neveu de Rameau (Rameau's Nephew)

"Rameau's Nephew"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-iderot's work"/S)                    "Diderot's work"
dialogue                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-iderot's work"/S)/Ch                    "Diderot's work"

>>             La Religieuse

Religieuse                        (D/P + "-iderot's work"/S)                       "Diderot's work"


>>          Diderot had affairs with the writer Madame Puisieux and with Sophie Volland.

*       "Denis Diderot"  >>  ("Madame Puisieux" /C2)/P  >>  (affairs /C2)/P/Ch  >>  ("Sophie Volland" /C2)/S  >>  (affairs /C2)/S/Ch


>>             Early works
>>             translation of Temple Stanyan's History of Greece (1743);

"History of Greece"                   (D/T + "-iderot's work"/S)                    "Diderot's work"

* "History of Greece"  >>  (translation /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Temple Stanyan's" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1743" /T)/GC/S/abT

>>            with two colleagues, François-Vincent Toussaint and Marc-Antoine Eidous, he produced a translation of Robert James's Medicinal Dictionary[1] (1746–1748);

"François-Vincent Toussaint"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)                  "Denis Diderot"
"Marc-Antoine Eidous"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/S)/Ch                  "Denis Diderot"

"Medicinal Dictionary"                   (D/T + "-iderot's work"/C2)                    "Diderot's work"

* "Medicinal Dictionary"  >>  ("François-Vincent Toussaint" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Marc-Antoine Eidous" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Robert James's" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  (translation /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1746" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1748" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>         free rendering of Shaftesbury's Inquiry Concerning Virtue and Merit (1745), with some original notes of his own.

"Inquiry Concerning Virtue and Merit"                   (D/T + "-iderot's work"/C2)                    "Diderot's work"

Shaftesbury                       (D/T + "-enis Diderot"/C2)                      "Denis Diderot"

* "Inquiry Concerning Virtue and Merit"  >>  (Shaftesbury /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1745" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("notes of his own" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  (original /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>          In 1746 he wrote his first original work: the Pensées philosophiques[2], and he added to this a short complementary essay on the sufficiency of natural religion.

"Pensées philosophiques"                   (D/P + "-iderot's work"/GC/S/abT)                    "Diderot's work"

* "Pensées philosophiques"  >>  ("1746" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("short complementary essay" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  (sufficiency /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("natural religion" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>          He then composed a volume of bawdy stories Les bijoux indiscrets (1748); in later years he repented this work.

"bijoux indiscrets"                   (D/P + "-iderot's work"/T)                    "Diderot's work"

* "bijoux indiscrets"  >>  ("1748" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("bawdy stories" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>         In 1747 he wrote the Promenade du sceptique, an allegory pointing first at the extravagances of Catholicism; second, at the vanity of the pleasures of the world which is the rival of the church; and third, at the desperate and unfathomable uncertainty of the philosophy which professes to be so high above both church and world.

"Promenade du sceptique"                   (D/P + "-iderot's work"/GC/S/abT)                    "Diderot's work"

* "Promenade du sceptique"  >>  (allegory /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1747" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  (Catholicism
/T)/GC/S/abT  >>  (extravagances /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  (vanity /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("pleasures of world"
/P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("desperate and unfathomable uncertainty of philosophy" /S)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("to be so high
above both church and world" /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>         Lettre sur les aveugles à l'usage de ceux qui voient ("Letter on the Blind") (1749),

"Letter on Blind"                     (D/C2 + "-iderot's work"/T)                    "Diderot's work"

*               "Letter on Blind"  >>  ("1749" /C2)/GC/S/abT

>>                Encyclopédie

Encyclopédie                (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert's work"/C2)/+cp                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert's work"
"co-editor"                (J/T + "-ean le Rond d'Alembert's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                 "Jean le Rond d'Alembert's work"

Encyclopédie                   (D/S + "-iderot's work"/C2)/+cp                    "Diderot's work"
"co-editor"                    (D/S + "-iderot's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                  "Diderot's work"

>>                 Republic of Letters
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Republic+of+Letters ,  

"Republic of Letters"                           (w/C2 + orld/P)                               world

>>            In 1750 an elaborate prospectus announced the project to a delighted public,

*           "Republic of Letters"  >>  "delighted public" /P

>>           They were hidden in the house of an unlikely confederate–Chretien de Lamoignon Malesherbes, the very official who ordered the search.

Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes

"Chretien de Lamoignon Malesherbes"                (D/C2 + "-enis Diderot"/P)/Ch               "Denis Diderot"


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/34544/pg34544.txt ,  
>>    Title: This is not a Story,        Original French title: Ceci n'est pas un conte
Author: Denis Diderot

"This is not Story"                 (D/C2 + "-iderot's work"/S)/+bp                  "Diderot's work"

*         "This is not Story"  >>  ("Ceci n'est pas un conte" /C2)/GC/S/abT

"This is not Story"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)/+bp                        Iliad



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "This is not Story"      and   Homer's Iliad

Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK I.

Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus' son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia's host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)5
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.

Who them to strife impell'd? What power divine?10
Latona's son and Jove's.[1] For he, incensed
004 Against the King, a foul contagion raised
In all the host, and multitudes destroy'd,
For that the son of Atreus had his priest
Dishonored, Chryses. To the fleet he came15
Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem
His daughter, and his hands charged with the wreath
And golden sceptre[2] of the God shaft-arm'd. ~ ~

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d#a2071 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34544 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/34544/pg34544.txt ,  
This Is Not A Story

When one tells a story it is for a listener; and however short the story is,
it is highly unlikely that the teller is not occasionally interrupted by his
audience. So I have introduced into the narration that will be read, and
which is not a story, or which is a bad one if you have doubts about that, a
character that might approximate the role of the reader; and I begin.

*    *    *    *    *

And you conclude right there?

--That a subject this interesting must make us dizzy, be the talk of the town
for a month, be phrased and rephrased until flavorless, produce a thousand
arguments, at least twenty leaflets, and around a hundred bits of verse in
favor or against. In spite of all the finesse, learning, and pure grit of the
author, given that his work has not lead to any violence it is mediocre. Very
mediocre.

--But it seems to me that we owe him a rather agreeable evening, and that
this reading has brought...

--What? A litany of worn-out vignettes fired from left and right,


"This is not Story"                 (D/C2 + "-iderot's work"/S)/+bp                  "Diderot's work"

*         "This is not Story"  >>  ("Ceci n'est pas un conte" /C2)/GC/S/abT

"This is not Story"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)/+bp                        Iliad

1.               When one tells a story it is for a listener

"When one tells story it is for listener"                  (B/C2 + "-ook I/One"/S)/+bp                   "Book I/One"

2.              and however short the story is

"and however short story is"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Achilles sing"/S)/+bp                   "Achilles sing"

3.            it is highly unlikely that the teller is not occasionally interrupted by his audience

"it is highly unlikely that teller is not occasionally interrupted by his audience"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "O Goddess"/S)/+bp                   "O Goddess"

4.            So I have introduced into the narration that will be read

"So I have introduced into narration that will be read"                  (P/C2 + "-eleus' son"/S)/+bp                   "Peleus' son"

5.             and which is not a story

"and which is not story"                  (H/C2 + "-is wrath pernicious"/S)/+bp                   "His wrath pernicious"

6.            or which is a bad one if you have doubts about that

"or which is bad one if you have doubts about that"                  (wh/C2 + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/S)/+bp                   "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

7. sent many a soul Illustrious into Ades premature --- a character that might approximate the role of the reader

"character that might approximate role of reader"                  (s/C2 + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/S)/+bp                   "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

8.
"and I begin"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And Heroes gave"/S)/+bp                   "And Heroes gave"

9.                  so stood the will of Jove

"And you conclude right there"                  (s/C2 + "-o stood will of Jove"/S)/+bp                   "so stood will of Jove"

10.   To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey --- That a subject this interesting must make us dizzy

"That subject this interesting must make us dizzy"                  (T/C2 + "-o dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/S)/+bp                   "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

11. When fierce dispute had separated once The noble Chief Achilles from the son Of Atreus --- be the talk of the town for a month

"be talk of town for month"                  (Wh/C2 + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/S)/+bp                   "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

12.
"be phrased and rephrased until flavorless"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Agamemnon/S)/+bp                   Agamemnon

13.                     produce a thousand arguments

"produce thousand arguments"                  (K/C2 + "-ing of men"/S)/+bp                   "King of men"

14.
"at least twenty leaflets"                  (Wh/C2 + "-o them to strife impell'd"/S)/+bp                   "Who them to strife impell'd"

15.              and around a hundred bits of verse in favor or against

"and around hundred bits of verse in favor or against"                  (Wh/C2 + "-at power divine"/S)/+bp                   "What power divine"

16.             In spite of all the finesse

"In spite of all finesse"                  (L/C2 + "-atona's son and Jove's"/S)/+bp                   "Latona's son and Jove's"

17.
learning                                (F/C2 + "-or he"/S)/+bp                            "For he"

18.                      incensed Against the King --- and pure grit of the author

"and pure grit of author"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "incensed Against King"/S)/+bp                   "incensed Against King"

19.               a foul contagion raised In all the host

"given that his work has not lead to any violence it is mediocre"                  (f/C2 + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/S)/+bp                   "foul contagion raised In all host"

20.
"Very mediocre"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and multitudes destroy'd"/S)/+bp                   "and multitudes destroy'd"

21. For that the son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored --- But it seems to me that we owe him a rather agreeable evening

"But it seems to me that we owe him rather agreeable evening"                  (F/C2 + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/S)/+bp                   "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

22.
"and that this reading has brought"                  (Chrys/C2 + es/S)/+bp                   Chryses

23.          To the fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter

What                  (T/C2 + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/S)/+bp                   "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"

24. and his hands charged with the wreath And golden sceptre of the God shaft-arm'd --- A litany of worn-out vignettes fired from left and right

"litany of worn-out vignettes fired from left and right"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"/S)/+bp                   "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Interpreter of Nature"  and  Homer's  Odyssey

•  Pensées sur l'interprétation de la nature, essai (1751)


http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1769/conversation.htm ,    
Conversation between D’Alembert and Diderot
Source:   Conversation between D'Alembert and Diderot (1769). from Diderot, Interpreter of Nature, translated by Jean Stewart and Jonathan Kemp, International Publishers,1943; Complete dialogue.

d'Alembert: I confess that a Being who exists somewhere and yet corresponds to no point in space, a Being who, lacking extension, yet occupies-space; who is present in his entirety in every part of that space, who is essentially different from matter and yet is one with matter, who follows its motion, and moves it, without himself being in motion, who acts on matter and yet is subject to all its vicissitudes, a Being about whom I can form no idea; a Being of so contradictory a nature, is an hypothesis difficult to accept. But other problems arise if we reject it; for if this faculty upon, which you propose as substitute, is a general and essential quality of matter, then stone must be sensitive.

Diderot: Why not?

d'Alembert: It's hard to believe.

Diderot: Yes, for him who cuts, chisels, and crushes it, and does not hear it cry out.

d'Alembert: I'd like you to tell me what difference there is, according to you, between a man and a statue, between marble and flesh.

Diderot: Not much. Flesh can be made from marble, and marble from flesh.

d'Alembert: But one is not the other.

Diderot: In the same way that what you call animate force is not the same as inanimate force.

d'Alembert: I don't follow you.

Diderot: ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider
I.
The Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among the
suitors. She has taken the form of Mentes, the King of a neighboring
tribe; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth.
Who will recognize her? Not the suitors; they can see no God in their
condition, least of all, the Goddess of Wisdom. "Telemachus was much
the first to observe her;" why just he? The fact is he was ready to see
her, and not only to see her, but to hear what she had to say. "For he
sat among the suitors grieved in heart, seeing his father in his mind's
eye," like Hamlet just before the latter saw the ghost. So careful is
the poet to prepare both sides--the divine epiphany, and the mortal who
is to behold it.

Furthermore, the young man saw his father "scattering the suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house." This is just what
the Goddess is going to tell with a new sanction, and it is just what
is going to happen in the course of the poem. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him. Throughout the whole interview the two main facts are
the example of the parent and the final revenge, both of which are
urged by the Goddess without and by the man within.

Still there is a difference. Telemachus is despondent; we might almost
say, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of the world. "The
Gods plot evil things" against the House of Ulysses, whose fate "they
make unknown above that of all men." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage. The poor boy has had a hard time; he
has come to question providence in his misery, and discredits the
goodness of the Gods.

Here, now, is the special function of Pallas. She instills courage into
his heart. ~ ~



Conversation between D’Alembert and Diderot
Source: Conversation between D'Alembert and Diderot (1769). from Diderot, Interpreter of Nature, translated by Jean Stewart and Jonathan Kemp, International Publishers,1943; Complete dialogue.


"Interpreter of Nature"                   (D/P + "-iderot's work"/T)/+bp                    "Diderot's work"

"Interpreter of Nature"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Odyssey/T)/+bp                     Odyssey

1.
"Conversation between D’Alembert and Diderot"                 (B/P + "-ook First"/T)/+bp                  "Book First"

2. The Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among the suitors

d'Alembert                (G/P + "-oddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"/T)/+bp               "Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"

3. She has taken the form of Mentes --- I confess that a Being who exists somewhere and yet corresponds to no point in space

"I confess that Being who exists somewhere and yet corresponds to no point in space"                (Sh/P + "-e has taken form of Mentes"/T)/+bp               "She has taken form of Mentes"

4.                 the King of a neighboring tribe --- a Being who

"Being who"                (K/P + "-ing of neighboring tribe"/T)/+bp               "King of neighboring tribe"

5.
"lacking extension"                (sh/P + "-e is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"/T)/+bp               "she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"

6.
"yet occupies-space"                (Wh/P + "-o will recognize her"/T)/+bp               "Who will recognize her"

7.               Not the suitors

"who is present in his entirety in every part of that space"                (N/P + "-ot suitors"/T)/+bp               "Not suitors"

8.
"who is essentially different from matter and yet is one with matter"                (th/P + "-ey can see no God in their condition"/T)/+bp               "they can see no God in their condition"

9.
"who follows its motion"                   (l/P + "-east of all"/T)/+bp                   "least of all"

10.             the Goddess of Wisdom

"and moves it"                (G/P + "-oddess of Wisdom"/T)/+bp               "Goddess of Wisdom"

11.               Telemachus was much the first to observe her

"without himself being in motion"                (T/P + "-elemachus was much first to observe her"/T)/+bp               "Telemachus was much first to observe her"

12.
"who acts on matter and yet is subject to all its vicissitudes"                (why/P + "just he"/T)/+bp               "why just he"

13.                The fact is he was ready to see her --- a Being about whom I can form no idea

"Being about whom I can form no idea"                (f/P + "-act is he was ready to see her"/T)/+bp               "fact is he was ready to see her"

14.                a Being of so contradictory a nature

"Being of so contradictory nature"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and not only to see her"/T)/+bp               "and not only to see her"

15.                is an hypothesis difficult to accept

"is hypothesis difficult to accept"                (b/P + "-ut to hear what she had to say"/T)/+bp               "but to hear what she had to say"

16.               For he sat among the suitors grieved in heart

"But other problems arise if we reject it"                (F/P + "-or he sat among suitors grieved in heart"/T)/+bp               "For he sat among suitors grieved in heart"

17.
"for if this faculty upon"                (s/P + "-eeing his father in his mind's eye"/T)/+bp               "seeing his father in his mind's eye"

18.              like Hamlet just before the latter saw the ghost

"which you propose as substitute"                (l/P + "-ike Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"/T)/+bp               "like Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"


19.         So careful is the poet to prepare both sides --- is a general and essential quality of matter

"is general and essential quality of matter"                (S/P + "-o careful is poet to prepare both sides"/T)/+bp               "So careful is poet to prepare both sides"

20.                the divine epiphany

"then stone must be sensitive"                (d/P + "-ivine epiphany"/T)/+bp               "divine epiphany"

21.             and the mortal who is to behold it

Diderot               ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and mortal who is to behold it"/T)/+bp               "and mortal who is to behold it"

22.
"Why not"                (F/P + urthermore/T)/+bp               Furthermore

23.                the young man saw his father

d'Alembert                (y/P + "-oung man saw his father"/T)/+bp               "young man saw his father"

24.               scattering the suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house

"It's hard to believe"                (s/P + " cattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"/T)/+bp               "scattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"

25.               This is just what the Goddess is going to tell with a new sanction

Diderot                (Th/P + "-is is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"/T)/+bp               "This is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"

26.               and it is just what is going to happen in the course of the poem

Yes                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"/T)/+bp               "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"

27.
"for him who cuts"                (Tr/P + "uly Telemachus is prepared internally"/T)/+bp               "Truly Telemachus is prepared internally"

28.
chisels                (h/P + "-e has already everything within him which is to come out of him"/T)/+bp               "he has already everything within him which is to come out of him"

29. Throughout the whole interview the two main facts are the example of the parent and the final revenge

"and crushes it"                (Th/P + "-roughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"/T)/+bp               "Throughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"

30.        both of which are urged by the Goddess without and by the man within

"and does not hear it cry out"                (b/P + "-oth of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"/T)/+bp               "both of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"

31.               Still there is a difference

d'Alembert                (S/P + "-till there is difference"/T)/+bp               "Still there is difference"

32.
"I'd like you to tell me what difference there is"                (T/P + "-elemachus is despondent"/T)/+bp               "Telemachus is despondent"

33.
"according to you"                (w/P + "-e might almost say"/T)/+bp               "we might almost say"

34.        he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of the world --- between a man and a statue

"between man and statue"                (h/P + "-e is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"/T)/+bp               "he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"

35.               The Gods plot evil things

"between marble and flesh"                (G/P + "-ods plot evil things"/T)/+bp               "Gods plot evil things"

36.               against the House of Ulysses

Diderot                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "against House of Ulysses"/T)/+bp               "against House of Ulysses"

37.
"Not much"                           (wh/P + "-ose fate"/T)/+bp                      "whose fate"

38.
"Flesh can be made from marble"                (th/P + "-ey make unknown above that of all men"/T)/+bp               "they make unknown above that of all men"

39.
"and marble from flesh"                (Th/P + "-en they have sent upon me these suitors who consume my heritage"/T)/+bp               "Then they have sent upon me these suitors who consume my heritage"

40.               The poor boy has had a hard time

d'Alembert                (p/P + "oor boy has had hard time"/T)/+bp               "poor boy has had hard time"

41.               But one is not the other

"But one is not other"                (h/P + "-e has come to question providence in his misery"/T)/+bp               "he has come to question providence in his misery"

42.              and discredits the goodness of the Gods

Diderot                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and discredits goodness of Gods"/T)/+bp               "and discredits goodness of Gods"

43.            In the same way that what you call animate force is not the same as inanimate force

"In same way that what you call animate force is not same as inanimate force"                (H/P + ere/T)/+bp               Here

44.
d'Alembert                                  (n/P + ow/T)/+bp                                 now

45.           is the special function of Pallas

"I don't follow you"                ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "is special function of Pallas"/T)/+bp               "is special function of Pallas"

46.
Diderot                (Sh/P + "-e instills courage into his heart"/T)/+bp               "She instills courage into his heart"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Letter to My Brother"  and  Homer's  Odyssey

http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1760/letter-brother.htm ,  
Letter to My Brother
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Ouevres Complètes. Paris, Garnier Frères, 1875.
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2005.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 29, 1760
Humani juris et naturalis est unicuique
Quod putaverit, colore, nec alii obest aut
Prodest alterius religio. Sed nec religionis est
Cogere religionemm, quae sponte suscipi debeat
Non vi; cum et hostiae ab animo lubenti
Expostulentur

– Tertul. Aplolog. Ad scapula.

That, dear brother, is what the weak and persecuted Christians said to the idolaters who dragged them to the foot of their altars.

It is impious to expose religion to the odious imputations of tyranny, hardness, injustice, unsociability, even with the design of bringing back to it those who unfortunately had left it.

The spirit can only acquiesce to that which seem to it to be true, the heart can only love that which seems to it to be good. Constraint will make a hypocrite of man if he is weak, a martyr if he is courageous. Weak or courageous, he will feel the injustice of persecution, and he will become indignant.


"Letter to My Brother"                  (D/P + "-iderot's work"/T)/+cp                    "Diderot's work"

"Letter to My Brother"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Odyssey/T)/+cp                    Odyssey


1.
Ouevres                               (B/P + "-ook First"/T)/+cp                       "Book First"

2. The Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among the suitors

Complètes               (G/P + "-oddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"/T)/+cp               "Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"

3.         She has taken the form of Mentes

December                (Sh/P + "-e has taken form of Mentes"/T)/+cp               "She has taken form of Mentes"

4.                 the King of a neighboring tribe

"29th"                (K/P + "-ing of neighboring tribe"/T)/+cp               "King of neighboring tribe"

5.
"1760"                (sh/P + "-e is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"/T)/+cp               "she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"

6.
Humani                 (Wh/P + "-o will recognize her"/T)/+cp               "Who will recognize her"

7.               Not the suitors

juris                               (N/P + "-ot suitors"/T)/+cp                       "Not suitors"

8.
et                (th/P + "-ey can see no God in their condition"/T)/+cp               "they can see no God in their condition"

9.
naturalis                          (l/P + "-east of all"/T)/+cp                           "least of all"

10.             the Goddess of Wisdom

est                      (G/P + "-oddess of Wisdom"/T)/+cp                  "Goddess of Wisdom"

11.               Telemachus was much the first to observe her

unicuique                (T/P + "-elemachus was much first to observe her"/T)/+cp               "Telemachus was much first to observe her"

12.
Quod                            (why/P + "just he"/T)/+cp                            "why just he"

13.                The fact is he was ready to see her --- a Being about whom I can form no idea

putaverit                (f/P + "-act is he was ready to see her"/T)/+cp               "fact is he was ready to see her"

14.
colore                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and not only to see her"/T)/+cp               "and not only to see her"

15.
nec                 (b/P + "-ut to hear what she had to say"/T)/+cp               "but to hear what she had to say"

Et cetera,        as below.


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider
I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (Complètes) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (December) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (29th) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (1760) --.
Who will recognize her - (Humani) --? Not <the> suitors - (juris) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (et) --, least of all - (naturalis) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (est) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (unicuique) --;" why just he - (Quod) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (putaverit) --, and not only to see her - (colore) --, but to hear what she had to say - (nec) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (alii) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (obest) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (aut) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (Prodest) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (alterius) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (religio) --.

Furthermore - (Sed) --, <the> young man saw his father - (nec) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (religionis) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (est) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (Cogere) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (religionemm) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (quae) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (sponte) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (suscipi) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (debeat) --. Telemachus is despondent - (Non) --; we might almost
say - (vi) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (cum) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (et) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (hostiae) --, whose fate - (ab) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (animo) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (lubenti) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (Expostulentur) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (Tertul) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (Aplolog) --.

Here - (Ad) --, now - (scapula) --, is <the> special function of Pallas - (That) --. She instills courage into
his heart - (dear) --. She gives strong hope of <the> return of his father - (brother) --, who  - (is) --"will
not long be absent from Ithaca - (what) --;" she also hints <the> purpose of <the>
Gods - (weak) --, which is on <the> point of fulfillment - (and) --. Be no longer <a> child - (persecuted) --;
follow <the> example of thy father - (Christians) --; go and learn about him and emulate
his deeds - (said) --. Therewith <the> Goddess furnishes to <the> doubting youth <a> plan
of immediate action - (to) ----altogether <the> best thing for throwing off his
mental paralysis - (idolaters) --. He is to proceed at once to Pylos and to Sparta - (who) -- "to
learn of his father - (dragged) -- " with <the> final outlook toward <the> destruction of
<the> suitors - (them) --. She is <a> veritable Goddess to <the> young striver - (to) --, speaking
<the> word of hope and wisdom - (foot) --, and then turning him back upon himself - (of) --.
Here again we must say that <the> Goddess was in <the> heart of Telemachus
uttering her spirit - (their) --, yet she was external to him also - (altars) --. Her voice is <the>
voice of <the> time - (It) --, of <the> reality - (is) --; all things are fluid to <the> hand of
Telemachus - (impious) --, and ready to be moulded to his scheme - (to) --. Still <the> Goddess is
in him just as well - (expose) --, is his thought - (religion) --, his wisdom - (to) --, which has now become
one with <the> reason of <the> world - (odious) --. Both sides are brought together by
<the> Poet in <the> most emphatic manner - (imputations) --; this is <the> supreme fact in his
procedure - (of) --. <The> subjective and objective elements are one - (tyranny) --; <the> divine
order puts its seal on <the> thought of <the> man - (hardness) --, unites with him - (injustice) --, makes
his plan its plan - (unsociability) --. Thus <the> God and <the> Individual are in harmony - (even) --, and
<the> great fulfillment becomes possible - (with) --. But if <the> thought of
Telemachus were <a> mere scheme of his own - (design) --, if it had not received <the>
stamp of divinity - (of) --, then it could never become <the> deed - (bringing) --, <the> heroic
deed - (back) --, which stands forth in <the> world existent in its own right and
eternal - (to) --.

<The> Goddess flits away - (it) --, "like <a> bird - (those) --," in speed and silence - (who) --. Telemachus
now recognizes that <the> stranger was <a> divinity - (unfortunately) --. For has he not <the>
proof in his own heart - (had) --? He is indeed <a> new person or <the> beginning
thereof - (left) --. But hark to this song - (it) --! ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "On the Evident"  and  Homer's  Odyssey


"On Evident"                    (D/T + "-iderot's work"/P)/+bp                     "Diderot's work"
"On Evident"                   (L/T + "-etter to My Brother"/P)/+bp                  "Letter to My Brother"

*                   Odyssey  >>  ("On Evident" /P/+bp)/T

http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/17xx/evident.htm ,  
On the Evident
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Ouevres Complètes, Vol IV. Paris, Garnier Frères, 1875;
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2005.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Another reasoning not yet made in favor of the evident is that which occurs in affairs of taste. Has it never happened that a good work has been taken for bad? Has a bad one ever consistently been taken for a good one? Who sanctions works of taste? Is it the multitude? No. It hardly reads, understands nothing, knows nothing, doesn’t think, doesn’t feel. It is ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Ouevres /P/+bp)/T

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (Complètes) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (Another) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (reasoning) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (not) --.
Who will recognize her - (yet) --? Not <the> suitors - (made) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (in) --, least of all - (favor) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (of) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (evident) --;" why just he - (is) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (that) --, and not only to see her - (which) --, but to hear what she had to say - (occurs) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (in) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (affairs) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (of) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (taste) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (Has) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (it) --.

Furthermore - (never) --, <the> young man saw his father - (happened) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (that) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (good) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (has) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (been) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (taken) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (for) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (bad) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (Has) --. Telemachus is despondent - (bad) --; we might almost
say - (one) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (ever) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (consistently) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (been) --, whose fate - (taken) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (for) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (good) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (one) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (Who) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (sanctions) --.

Here - (works) --, now - (of) --, is <the> special function of Pallas - (taste) --. She instills courage into
his heart - (Is) --. She gives strong hope of <the> return of his father - (it) --, who - (multitude) -- "will
not long be absent from Ithaca - (No) --;" she also hints <the> purpose of <the>
Gods - (It) --, which is on <the> point of fulfillment - (hardly) --. Be no longer <a> child - (reads) --;
follow <the> example of thy father - (understands) --; go and learn about him and emulate
his deeds - (nothing) --. Therewith <the> Goddess furnishes to <the> doubting youth <a> plan
of immediate action - (knows) ----altogether <the> best thing for throwing off his
mental paralysis - (nothing) --. He is to proceed at once to Pylos and to Sparta - (doesn’t) -- "to
learn of his father - (think) -- " with <the> final outlook toward <the> destruction of
<the> suitors - (doesn’t) --. She is <a> veritable Goddess to <the> young striver - (feel) --, speaking
<the> word of hope and wisdom - (It) --, and then turning him back upon himself - (is) --.
~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "On Genius"  and  Homer's  Odyssey


"On Genius"                    (D/T + "-iderot's work"/P)/+cp                     "Diderot's work"
"On Genius"                  (L/T + "-etter to My Brother"/P)/+cp                  "Letter to My Brother"
"On Genius"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Evident"/P)/+cp                  "On Evident"

*                   Odyssey  >>  ("On Genius" /P/+cp)/T

http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/17xx/on-genius.htm ,  
On Genius
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Oeuvres Complètes. Paris, Garnier Fréres, 1875;
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2006.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In men of genius: poets, philosophers, painters, orators, musicians, there is some particular, secret, indefinable quality of the soul without which they can execute nothing great or beautiful. Is it imagination? No. I’ve seen good and strong imaginations that promised much ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Ouevres /P/+cp)/T

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (Complètes) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (In) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (men) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (of) --.
Who will recognize her - (genius) --? Not <the> suitors - (poets) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (philosophers) --, least of all - (painters) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (orators) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (musicians) --;" why just he - (there) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (is) --, and not only to see her - (some) --, but to hear what she had to say - (particular) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (secret) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (indefinable) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (quality) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (of) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (soul) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (without) --.

Furthermore - (which) --, <the> young man saw his father - (they) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (can) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (execute) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (nothing) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (great) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (or) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (beautiful) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (Is) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (it) --. Telemachus is despondent - (imagination) --; we might almost
say - (No) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (I’ve) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (seen) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (good) --, whose fate - (and) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (strong) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (imaginations) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (that) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (promised) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (much) --. ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"  and  Homer's  Odyssey


"Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"                  (D/T + "-iderot's work"/S)/+bp                  "Diderot's work"
"warning to those who have more taste than fortune"                  (D/T + "-iderot's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Diderot's work"

"Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"                  (L/T + "-etter to My Brother"/S)/+bp                  "Letter to My Brother"
"Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Evident"/S)/+bp                  "On Evident"
"Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Genius"/S)/+bp                  "On Genius"

*                   Odyssey  >>  ("Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown" /T/+cp)/S

http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1769/regrets.htm ,  
Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown, or
A warning to those who have more taste than fortune
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Oeuvres Complètes, Vol IV. Paris, Garnier Fréres, 1875;
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2005.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Why didn’t I keep it? It was used to me and I was used to it. It molded all the folds of my body without inhibiting it; I was picturesque and handsome. The other one is stiff, and starchy, makes me look ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Ouevres /T/+cp)/S

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (Complètes) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (Why) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (didn’t) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (I) --.
Who will recognize her - (keep) --? Not <the> suitors - (it) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (It) --, least of all - (was) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (used) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (to) --;" why just he - (me) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (and) --, and not only to see her - (I) --, but to hear what she had to say - (was) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (used) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (to) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (it) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (It) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (molded) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (all) --.

Furthermore - (folds) --, <the> young man saw his father - (of) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (my) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (body) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (without) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (inhibiting) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (it) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (I) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (was) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (picturesque) --. Telemachus is despondent - (and) --; we might almost
say - (handsome) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (other) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (one) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (is) --, whose fate - (stiff) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (and) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (starchy) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (makes) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (me) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (look) --. ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Thoughts on Religion"  and  Homer's  Odyssey


"Thoughts on Religion"                  (D/T + "-iderot's work"/S)/+cp                  "Diderot's work"
"Addition to Philosophical Thoughts"                  (D/T + "-iderot's work"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Diderot's work"

"Thoughts on Religion"                  (L/T + "-etter to My Brother"/S)/+cp                  "Letter to My Brother"
"Thoughts on Religion"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Evident"/S)/+cp                  "On Evident"
"Thoughts on Religion"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Genius"/S)/+cp                  "On Genius"
"Thoughts on Religion"                  (R/T + "-egrets for my Old Dressing Gown"/S)/+cp                  "Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"


*                   Odyssey  >>  ("Thoughts on Religion" /T/+bp)/S


http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1770/religion.htm ,  
Thoughts on Religion
(Addition to the “Philosophical Thoughts”)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Oeuvres Complètes, Vol I. Paris, Garnier Fréres, 1875;
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2005, revised 2008.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I
In religion, doubts, far from being acts of impiety, should be looked upon as good works when they issue from a man who humbly recognizes his ignorance, and when they are born of the fear of displeasing God by the abuse of reason

II
Admitting to a degree of conformity between man’s reason and eternal reason – which is God – and then claiming that God demands the sacrifice of human reason, is to establish that he wants and doesn’t want at the same time.

III
When God, from whom we receive reason, demands its sacrifice it is like a prestidigitator who takes back what he has given.

IV
If I renounce reason ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Ouevres /T/+bp)/S

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (Complètes) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (I/One) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (religion) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (doubts) --.
Who will recognize her - (far) --? Not <the> suitors - (from) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (being) --, least of all - (acts) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (of) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (impiety) --;" why just he - (should) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (be) --, and not only to see her - (looked) --, but to hear what she had to say - (upon) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (as) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (good) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (works) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (when) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (they) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (issue) --.

Furthermore - (from) --, <the> young man saw his father - (man) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (who) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (humbly) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (recognizes) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (his) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (ignorance) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (and) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (when) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (they) --. Telemachus is despondent - (are) --; we might almost
say - (born) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (of) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (fear) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (of) --, whose fate - (displeasing) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (God) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (by) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (abuse) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (of) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (reason) --.

Here - (II/Two) --, now - (Admitting) --, is <the> special function of Pallas - (to) --. She instills courage into
his heart - (degree) --. She gives strong hope of <the> return of his father - (of) --, who - (conformity) -- "will
not long be absent from Ithaca - (between) --;" she also hints <the> purpose of <the>
Gods - (man’s) --, which is on <the> point of fulfillment - (reason) --. Be no longer <a> child - (and) --;
follow <the> example of thy father - (eternal) --; go and learn about him and emulate
his deeds - (reason) --. Therewith <the> Goddess furnishes to <the> doubting youth <a> plan
of immediate action - (which) ----altogether <the> best thing for throwing off his
mental paralysis - (is) --. He is to proceed at once to Pylos and to Sparta - (God) -- "to
learn of his father - (and) -- " with <the> final outlook toward <the> destruction of
<the> suitors - (then) --. She is <a> veritable Goddess to <the> young striver - (claiming) --, speaking
<the> word of hope and wisdom - (that) --, and then turning him back upon himself - (God) --.
Here again we must say that <the> Goddess was in <the> heart of Telemachus
uttering her spirit - (demands) --, yet she was external to him also - (sacrifice) --. Her voice is <the>
voice of <the> time - (of) --, of <the> reality - (human) --; all things are fluid to <the> hand of
Telemachus - (reason) --, and ready to be moulded to his scheme - (is) --. Still <the> Goddess is
in him just as well - (to) --, is his thought - (establish) --, his wisdom - (that) --, which has now become
one with <the> reason of <the> world - (he) --. Both sides are brought together by
<the> Poet in <the> most emphatic manner - (wants) --; this is <the> supreme fact in his
procedure - (and) --. <The> subjective and objective elements are one - (doesn’t) --; <the> divine
order puts its seal on <the> thought of <the> man - (want) --, unites with him - (at) --, makes
his plan its plan - (same) --. Thus <the> God and <the> Individual are in harmony - (time) --, and
<the> great fulfillment becomes possible - (III/Three) --. But if <the> thought of
Telemachus were <a> mere scheme of his own - (When) --, if it had not received <the>
stamp of divinity - (God) --, then it could never become <the> deed - (from) --, <the> heroic
deed - (whom) --, which stands forth in <the> world existent in its own right and
eternal - (we) --.

<The> Goddess flits away - (receive) --, "like <a> bird - (reason) --," in speed and silence - (demands) --. Telemachus
now recognizes that <the> stranger was <a> divinity - (its) --. For has he not <the>
proof in his own heart - (sacrifice) --? He is indeed <a> new person or <the> beginning
thereof - (it) --. But hark to this song - (is) --! It is <the> bard singing - (like) -- "<the> sad return
of <the> Greeks - (prestidigitator) --"--<the> very song which <the> poet himself is now singing in
this Odyssey - (who) --. For it is also <a> sad return - (takes) --, indeed many sad returns - (back) --, as
we shall see hereafter - (what) --. Homer has thus put himself into his poem
singing his poem - (he) --. Who cannot feel that this touch is taken from life - (has) --,
is <an> echo of his own experience in some princely hall - (given) --?

But here she comes - (IV/Four) --, <the> grand lady of <the> story - (If) --, Penelope - (I) --, <the> wife of
Ulysses - (renounce) --, as it were in response to <the> music - (reason) --. ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Rameau’s Nephew"  and  Homer's  Odyssey

"Rameau’s Nephew"                  (D/P + "-iderot's work"/S)/+bp                  "Diderot's work"
"Vertumnis, quotquot sunt, natus iniquis"                  (D/P + "-iderot's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Diderot's work"

"Rameau’s Nephew"                  (Th/P + "-oughts on Religion"/S)/+bp                  "Thoughts on Religion"
"Rameau’s Nephew"                  (L/P + "-etter to My Brother"/S)/+bp                  "Letter to My Brother"
"Rameau’s Nephew"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "On Evident"/S)/+bp                  "On Evident"
"Rameau’s Nephew"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "On Genius"/S)/+bp                  "On Genius"
"Rameau’s Nephew"                  (R/P + "-egrets for my Old Dressing Gown"/S)/+bp                  "Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"


*                   Odyssey  >>  ("Rameau’s Nephew" /P/+cp)/S


http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/index.htm ,  
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1769/rameaus-nephew.htm ,  
Rameau’s Nephew
Vertumnis, quotquot sunt, natus iniquis
(Horat., Lib. II, Satyr. VII)
[Born under every changeful star]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: http://www.mala.bc.ca/~johnstoi/diderot/rameau_E.htm;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) Ian C. Johnston of Malaspina University-College, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada 2002.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No matter what the weather, rain or shine, it’s my habit every evening at about five o’clock to take a walk around the Palais Royal. I’m the one you see dreaming on the bench in Argenson’s Alley, always alone. I talk to myself about politics, love, ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Horat /P/+cp)/S

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (No) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (matter) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (what) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (weather) --.
Who will recognize her - (rain) --? Not <the> suitors - (or) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (shine) --, least of all - (it’s) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (my) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (habit) --;" why just he - (every) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (evening) --, and not only to see her - (at) --, but to hear what she had to say - (about) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (five) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (o’clock) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (to) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (take) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (walk) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (around) --.

Furthermore - (Palais) --, <the> young man saw his father - (Royal) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (I’m) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (one) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (you) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (see) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (dreaming) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (on) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (bench) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (in) --. Telemachus is despondent - (Argenson’s) --; we might almost
say - (Alley) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (always) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (alone) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (I) --, whose fate - (talk) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (to) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (myself) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (about) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (politics) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (love) --. ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  "Freedom of Thought"  and  Homer's  Odyssey

"Freedom of Thought"                  (D/P + "-iderot's work"/S)/+cp                  "Diderot's work"

"Freedom of Thought"                  (Th/P + "-oughts on Religion"/S)/+cp                  "Thoughts on Religion"
"Freedom of Thought"                  (L/P + "-etter to My Brother"/S)/+cp                  "Letter to My Brother"
"Freedom of Thought"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "On Evident"/S)/+cp                  "On Evident"
"Freedom of Thought"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "On Genius"/S)/+cp                  "On Genius"
"Freedom of Thought"                  (R/P + "-egrets for my Old Dressing Gown"/S)/+cp                  "Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"


*                   Odyssey  >>  ("Freedom of Thought" /T/+bp)/C2


http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1765/freedom-thought.htm ,  
Freedom of Thought
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: L’Encyclopédie, Tome neuvième. Reprod. de l’édition. de, Neufchastel : chez Samuel Faulche: chez Samuel Faulche, [1765];
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2007.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FREEDOM OF THOUGHT: (Moral) This term, freedom of thought, has two meanings, one general and the other limited. In the first it signifies that generous strength of spirit that binds our beliefs solely to truth. In the second it expresses the only effect that, according ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Encyclopédie /T/+bp)/C2

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (FREEDOM) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (OF) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (THOUGHT) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (Moral) --.
Who will recognize her - (This) --? Not <the> suitors - (term) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (freedom) --, least of all - (of) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (thought) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (has) --;" why just he - (two) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (meanings) --, and not only to see her - (one) --, but to hear what she had to say - (general) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (and) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (other) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (limited) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (In) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (first) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (it) --.

Furthermore - (signifies) --, <the> young man saw his father - (that) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (generous) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (strength) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (of) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (spirit) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (that) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (binds) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (our) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (beliefs) --. Telemachus is despondent - (solely) --; we might almost
say - (to) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (truth) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (In) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (second) --, whose fate - (it) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (expresses) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (only) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (effect) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (that) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (according) --. ~ ~



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Diderot's  Maimonides  and  Homer's  Odyssey

Maimonides                     (D/T + "-iderot's work"/C2)/+bp                   "Diderot's work"

Maimonides                 (Fr/T + "-eedom of Thought"/C2)/+bp                "Freedom of Thought"
Maimonides                 (L/T + "-etter to My Brother"/C2)/+bp                "Letter to My Brother"
Maimonides                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Evident"/C2)/+bp                  "On Evident"
Maimonides                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "On Genius"/C2)/+bp                    "On Genius"
Maimonides                 (R/T + "-egrets for my Old Dressing Gown"/C2)/+bp                "Regrets for my Old Dressing Gown"


*                   Odyssey  >>  (Maimonides /T/+cp)/C2


http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/diderot/1765/maimonides.htm ,    
Maimonides
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: L’Encyclopédie, Tome neuvième. Reprod. de l’édition. de, Neufchastel : chez Samuel Faulche, [1765];
Translated: for marxists.org by Mitchell Abidor;
CopyLeft: Creative Commons (Attribute & ShareAlike) marxists.org 2007.

This entry – excerpted form the longer entry on Judaism – on the greatest of Jewish religious thinkers, one who strove mightily to apply reason to revealed texts, is interesting in several ways. As a biography it is wildly inaccurate, with nearly every event it ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider

*                   "Book First"  >>  (Encyclopédie /T/+cp)/C2

I.
<The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the>
suitors - (This) --. She has taken <the> form of Mentes - (entry) --, <the> King of <a> neighboring
tribe - (excerpted) --; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth - (form) --.
Who will recognize her - (longer) --? Not <the> suitors - (entry) --; they can see no God in their
condition - (on) --, least of all - (Judaism) --, <the> Goddess of Wisdom - (on) --. "Telemachus was much
<the> first to observe her - (greatest) --;" why just he - (of) --? <The> fact is he was ready to see
her - (Jewish) --, and not only to see her - (religious) --, but to hear what she had to say - (thinkers) --. "For he
sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart - (one) --, seeing his father in his mind's
eye - (who) --," like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost - (strove) --. So careful is
<the> poet to prepare both sides - (mightily) -- --<the> divine epiphany - (to) --, and <the> mortal who
is to behold it - (apply) --.

Furthermore - (reason) --, <the> young man saw his father - (to) -- "scattering <the> suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house - (revealed) --." This is just what
<the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction - (texts) --, and it is just what
is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem - (is) --. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally - (interesting) --; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him - (in) --. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are
<the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge - (several) --, both of which are
urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within - (ways) --.

Still there is <a> difference - (As) --. Telemachus is despondent - (biography) --; we might almost
say - (it) --, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world - (is) --. "<The>
Gods plot evil things - (wildly) --" against <the> House of Ulysses - (inaccurate) --, whose fate - (with) -- "they
make unknown above that of all men - (nearly) --." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage - (every) --. <The> poor boy has had <a> hard time - (event) --; he
has come to question providence in his misery - (it) --, and discredits <the>
goodness of <the> Gods - (recounts) --. ~ ~



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   "Encyclopédie, English"      and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

Encyclopédie                     (P/T + "-arallel Lives"/C2)/+cp                     "Parallel Lives"
Encyclopédie                     (P/S + "-arallel Lives"/C2)/+cp                     "Parallel Lives"

*  See Jean le Rond d'Alembert


André Le Breton
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Andr%c3%a9+Le+Breton ,  

"André Le Breton"                              (D/C2 + iderot/T)                            Diderot

>>           Ephraim Chambers' Cyclopaedia, or Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Ephraim+Chambers ,    

"Ephraim Chambers"                   (D/GC/S/abT + iderot/T)/+cp                      Diderot

Cyclopaedia                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Ephraim Chambers' work"/T)                    "Ephraim Chambers' work"

"Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Ephraim Chambers' work"/T)/Ch                   "Ephraim Chambers' work"

Cyclopaedia                      ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Encyclopédie/T)                       Encyclopédie

*            "Parallel Lives"  >>  (Cyclopaedia /P)/T



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Ephraim Chambers' Cyclopaedia    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"


"Ephraim Chambers"                     (D/GC/S/abT + iderot/T)/+cp                      Diderot

Cyclopaedia                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Ephraim Chambers' work"/T)                    "Ephraim Chambers' work"
"Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Ephraim Chambers' work"/T)/Ch                   "Ephraim Chambers' work"

Cyclopaedia                      ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Encyclopédie/T)                       Encyclopédie

*            "Parallel Lives"  >>  (Cyclopaedia /P)/T

*            Theseus  >>  ("To King" /P)/T
*            Theseus  >>  ("dedication" /P/Ch)/T

http://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/collections/HistSciTech/Cyclopaedia ,    
http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/HistSciTech/HistSciTech-idx?type=browse&scope=HISTSCITECH.CYCLOSUB ,  
http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/HistSciTech/HistSciTech-idx?type=header&id=HistSciTech.Cyclopaedia01 ,  

http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/HistSciTech/HistSciTech-idx?type=article&did=HistSciTech.Cyclopaedia01.i0004&id=HistSciTech.Cyclopaedia01&isize=M ,    

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/chapter1.html ,    

Theseus - (To <the> King) --
As geographers - (Sir) --, Sosius - (<The> Arts and Sciences humbly crave Audience of Your Majesty) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (<The> near Concern they have in <the> Happiness of <a> People) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (assures 'em of <the> favourable Attention of <a> Prince who makes that happiness his own) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - ('Tis by These) --, unapproachable bogs - (<the> parsimony of nature is supplied) --, Scythian ice - (and Life render'd easy and agreeable under its numerous Infirmities) --, or <a> frozen sea - (By these <the> mind is reclaim'd from its wildness) --, so - (and enrich'd with Sentiments which lead to Virtue and Glory) --, in this work of mine - ('Tis these) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (in fine) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (that make <the> Difference between your Majesty's Subjects) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (and <the> Savages of Canada) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (or <the> Cape of Good Hope) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (<The> protection of Arts has ever been esteemed <the> proper Province of <the> Great) --; there is no credit - ('Tis <a> Branch of <the> Regal Office) --, or certainty any farther - (which <a> Prince) --. Yet - (like Your Majesty) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (equal to <the> whole Charge of <a> Crown) --, I thought I might - (will not suffer to be alienated into other Hands) --, not without reason - (From this) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (do <the> first and most distinguish'd Names in <the> Lift of Fame) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (derive <a> large Share of their Glory) --.

Considering therefore with myself - (and if there be any Age or Nation more conspicuous than <the> reft) --

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (and which is look'd on with Envy by your own) --?
Or whom oppose - ('tis that wherein <the> Sovereigns have signalized themselves most in this Quality) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (Indeed) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it - (<the> Time seems at hand) --), I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (when we are no longer to envy Rome her Augustus and Augustan Age) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (but Rome in her turn shall envy ours) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (SOMETHING extraordinary is apparently intended by Providence in calling such <a> Prince) --, in what shall follow - (to such <a> People) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (<A> Prince who feels <a> generous Impulse to devote his Cares and all his Toils to <the> Welfare of Mankind) --. In any case - (and <a> People conspiring with unexampled Ardor and Unanimity to all glorious Views) --, however - (Some of our best princes have had their Hands ty'd down) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (check'd by reluctant Factions) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (who opposed every nobler Design) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (Your Majesty has found <the> happy secret) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (to make even Contention do you Homage) --.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars - (and turn Opposition itself into Approbation) --. Both of them - (and Applause) --, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage - (THERE is <a> Time reserv'd in Fate for every Nation to arrive at its Height) --, had <the> repute of being sprung from <the> gods - (and <the> uppermost Place on <the> Terrestrial Ball is held successively by several States) --.

Both warriors - (May not <the> numerous Presages which usher in Your Majesty' Reign) --; that by all <the> world’s allowed - (give us room to expect that our turn is next) --.

Both of them united with strength of body <an> equal vigor mind - (and that what Greece was under Alexander) --; and of <the> two most famous cities of <the> world <the> one built Rome - (and Rome under Augustus Casar) --, and <the> other made Athens be inhabited - (Britain shall be under George and Caroline) --. Both stand charged with <the> rape of women - (BUT even this were to under-rate our Hopes) --; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home - (which are rais'd) --; but towards <the> close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen - (by your majesty) --, if - (to something still more truly glorious) --, that is - (Greatness) --, we may take <the> stories least like poetry as our guide to <the> truth - (so fondly coveted) --.

<The> lineage of Theseus - (has already cost <the> world very dear) --, by his father’s side - (and) --, ascends as high as to Erechtheus and <the> first inhabitants of Attica - (tho still pursued by unthinking Men under almost every Shape) --. By his mother’s side he was descended of Pelops - (is only desirable in <a> few) --. ~ ~



André Le Breton
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Andr%c3%a9+Le+Breton ,  

"André Le Breton"                              (D/C2 + iderot/T)                            Diderot

>>         one of the four publishers of the Encyclopédie of Diderot and d'Alembert, along with Michel-Antoine David, Laurent Durand, and Antoine-Claude Briasson.


"Michel-Antoine David"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "André Le Breton"/P)                    "André Le Breton"
"Laurent Durand"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "André Le Breton"/T)                    "André Le Breton"
"Antoine-Claude Briasson"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "André Le Breton"/C2)                    "André Le Breton"

>>           In 1745, le Breton set out to publish a translation of Ephraim Chambers' Cyclopaedia of 1728. He initially chose Jean Paul de Gua de Malves as his editor, but he tired of the job after two years, and in 1747, the editorship went to Diderot. For a more detailed account, see Encyclopédie.

* Cyclopaedia  >>  ("Jean Paul de Gua de Malves" /P) /GC/S/abT  >>  ("1745" /P/Ch) /GC/S/abT  >>  (Diderot /T) /GC/S/abT  >>  ("1747" /T/Ch) /GC/S/abT



Pierre Bayle
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Pierre+Bayle ,    

"Pierre Bayle"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/T)                  "Denis Diderot"

>>               18 November 1647 – 28 December 1706
 
"1647"                          (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/T)/+bp                          "Pierre Bayle"
November                       (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/T)/+cp                         "Pierre Bayle"
"18th"                           (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/T)/Ch                          "Pierre Bayle"

"1706"                         (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/P)/+bp                          "Pierre Bayle"
December                       (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/P)/+cp                          "Pierre Bayle"
"28th"                           (P/S + "-ierre Bayle"/P)/Ch                          "Pierre Bayle"

>>        best known for his seminal work the Historical and Critical Dictionary, published beginning in 1695



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Pierre Bayle's  "Historical and Critical Dictionary"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"


"Historical and Critical Dictionary"                      (P/P + "-ierre Bayle's work"/T)                   "Pierre Bayle's work"

"Historical and Critical Dictionary"                      (P/P + "- arallel Lives"/T)                   "Parallel Lives"

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Dictionnaire+Historique+et+Critique ,  
http://books.google.com/books?id=qCbdP5xBEdYC ,    
http://books.google.com/books?id=qCbdP5xBEdYC&printsec=frontcover&hl=ko#v=onepage&q&f=false ,  

advertisement                               (Th/P + eseus/T)                              Theseus

"established character of Bayle for erudition"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "As geographers"/T)                   "As geographers"

acuteness                                    (S/P + osius/T)                                 Sosius

Et cetera           as below.


Theseus - (advertisement) --
As geographers - (<The> established character of Bayle for erudition) --, Sosius - (acuteness) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (and philosophical impartiality) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (while it supersedes <the> necessity of all remarks on that elaborate storehouse of Fact) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - (Opinion) --, unapproachable bogs - (and illustrative Discussion) --, Scythian ice - (<the> Historical and Critical Dictionary) --, or <a> frozen sea - (it is presumed will sufficiently sanction <a> judicious selection of its most curious and instructive contents) --, so - (Happily for <the> interest of mental freedom and <the> unfettered exercise of reason) --, in this work of mine - (Bayle arose at <a> period when <the> Aristotelian) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (or scholastic philosophy) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (in <the> behalf of which priestcraft and bigotry rallied to <the> last moment) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (lay prostrate) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (but not absolutely defunct) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (and in consequence) --; there is no credit - (when) --, or certainty any farther - (to <a> free and investigative spirit) --. Yet - (it was necessary to join <an> accurate notion of <the> premises and field of knowledge of <the> doctrines assailed) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (In <the> great work of Bayle) --, I thought I might - (therefore) --, not without reason - (much sound information) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (subtle disquisition) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (and curious and instructive fact) --.

Considering therefore with myself - (is encumbered with <a> quantity of matter which) --

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (however valuable in advertence to gone-by studies and associations) --?
Or whom oppose - (Time has for <the> most part thrown away) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (This remark leads at once to <the> grounds of <the> parent undertaking) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it - (<the> object of which is to present to <the> general reader) --), I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (in <a> comparatively small and purchasable form) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (that portion of <the> Historical and Critical Dictionary of Bayle) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (<the> value of which) --, in what shall follow - (in <the> way of information) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (is unequivocal) --. In any case - (in learning instructive or curious) --, however - (and in critical and intellectual philosophy universal and permanent) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (To some) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (to whom <the> Historical and Critical Dictionary is but cursorily known) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (<the> attraction of <a> selection from it may be doubted) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (at <a> period distinguished by <an> engrossing attachment to <the> results of practical science and positive and applicable information) --.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars - (It is thought) --. Both of them - (however) --, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage - (by those to whom <the> completion of <the> present work has been intrusted) --, had <the> repute of being sprung from <the> gods - (that <the> foregoing tendency is united to <a> great avidity for general knowledge) --.

Both warriors - (and especially for <a> keen exercise of <the> reasoning faculties in reference to speculative points of all kinds) --; that by all <the> world’s allowed - (<The> acute and discriminating mind of Bayle deals with many which will be eternally important) --.

Both of them united with strength of body <an> equal vigor mind - (at least while extensive superstructures) --; and of <the> two most famous cities of <the> world <the> one built Rome - (in <a> social point of view) --, and <the> other made Athens be inhabited - (are founded upon them) --. Both stand charged with <the> rape of women - (All his comparative and ingenious disquisition on themes of this leading nature is of course retained) --; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home - (and <a> healthy exercise of <the> understanding upon <the> grander divisions of human opinion secured) --; but towards <the> close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen - (In <the> selection of biographical) --, if - (traditional) --, that is - (and mythological matter) --, we may take <the> stories least like poetry as our guide to <the> truth - (with <a> due attention to <the> curious and <the> amusing) --.

<The> lineage of Theseus - (<an> endeavour has been made to include whatever is more or less connected with events of lasting importance) --, by his father’s side - (or linked) --, ascends as high as to Erechtheus and <the> first inhabitants of Attica - (theoretically or otherwise) --. By his mother’s side he was descended of Pelops - (to existing associations) --. ~ ~



Laurence Sterne
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Laurence+Sterne ,    

"Laurence Sterne"                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-enis Diderot"/P)                  "Denis Diderot"

*                    "Laurence Sterne"  >>  Sterne /P

Born                         24 November 1713               Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland
Died                    18 March 1768 (aged 54)                       London, Great Britain

"1713"                      (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/T)/+bp                     "Laurence Sterne"
November                   (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/T)/+cp                     "Laurence Sterne"
"24th"                      (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Laurence Sterne"
"Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland"             (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/T)/Ch/+cp               "Laurence Sterne"

"1768"                      (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/S)/+bp                     "Laurence Sterne"
March                       (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/S)/+cp                     "Laurence Sterne"
"18th"                   (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/S)/Ch/+bp                    "Laurence Sterne"
"London, Great Britain"                (L/P + "-aurence Sterne"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "Laurence Sterne"

>>        The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy;

"Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-aurence Sterne's work"/P)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

"Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-aurence Sterne's work"/S)                "Laurence Sterne's work"


* Works

>>          A Political Romance (1759)

"Political Romance"                 (L/T + "-aurence Sterne's work"/P)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

>>          A Fragment in the Manner of Rabelais

"Fragment in Manner of Rabelais"                 (L/T + "-aurence Sterne's work"/S)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

>>          The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas

"Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas"                 (L/P + "-aurence Sterne's work"/S)                "Laurence Sterne's work"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Laurence Sterne's  "Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

"Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-aurence Sterne's work"/P)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

"Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman"                 (P/GC/S/abT + "-arallel Lives"/P)                "Parallel Lives"

http://www.gasl.org/refbib/Sterne__Shandy_Journey.pdf .    
To the Right Honourable
Mr. PITT.
SIR,
NEVER poor Wight of a Dedicator had less hopes from his
Dedication, than I have from this of mine; for it is written
in a bye corner of the kingdom, and in a retired thatch’d
house, where I live in a constant endeavour to fence against the
infirmities of ill health, and other evils of life, by mirth; being
firmly persuaded that every time a man smiles,—but much more
so, when he laughs, that it adds something to this Fragment of
Life.
I humbly beg, Sir, that you will honour this book by taking
it——–(not under your Protection,——–it must protect itself,
but)—into the country with you; where, if I am ever told, it has
made you smile, or can conceive it has beguiled you of one
moment’s pain——–I shall think myself as happy as a minister
of state;——–perhaps much happier than any one (one only
excepted) that I have ever read or heard of.
I am, great Sir,
(and what is more to your Honour,)
I am, good Sir,
Your Well-wisher,
and most humble Fellow-Subject,
THE AUTHOR.

C HA P. I.
I Wish either my father or my mother, or indeed both of them,
as they were in duty both equally bound to it, had minded
what they were about when they begot me; had they duly
consider’d how much depended upon what they were then
doing;—that not only the production of a rational Being was
concern’d in it, but that possibly the happy formation and
temperature of his body, perhaps his genius and the very cast
of his mind;—and, for aught they knew to the contrary, even
the fortunes of his whole house might take their turn from the
humours and dispositions which were then uppermost:——
Had they duly weighed and considered all this, and proceeded
accordingly,——I am verily persuaded I should have made a
quite different figure in the world, from that, in which the reader
is likely to see me.—Believe me, good folks, this is not so
inconsiderable a thing as many of you may think it;—you have
all, I dare say, heard of the animal spirits, as how they are
transfused from father to son, &c. &c.—and a great deal to
that purpose:—Well, you may take my word, that nine parts in
ten of a man’s sense or his nonsense, his successes and miscarriages
in this world depend upon their motions and activity,
and the different tracks and trains you put them into; so that
6 VOL. I
when they are once set a-going, whether right or wrong, ’tis not
a halfpenny matter, - - away they go cluttering like hey-go-mad;
and by treading the same steps over and over again, they presently
make a road of it, as plain and as smooth as a garden-walk,
which, when they are once used to, the Devil himself sometimes
shall not be able to drive them off it.
Pray, my dear, quoth my mother, have you not forgot to
wind up the clock?——Good G—! cried my father, making an
exclamation, but taking care to moderate his voice at the same
time,——Did ever woman, since the creation of the world,
interrupt a man with such a silly question? Pray, what was your
father saying?——Nothing.

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/chapter1.html ,    
Theseus
As geographers, Sosius, crowd into the edges of their maps parts of the world which they do not know about, adding notes in the margin to the effect, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts, unapproachable bogs, Scythian ice, or a frozen sea, so, in this work of mine, in which I have compared the lives of the greatest men with one another, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find a footing in, I might very well say of those that are farther off, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions, the only inhabitants are the poets and inventors of fables; there is no credit, or certainty any farther. Yet, after publishing an account of Lycurgus the lawgiver and Numa the king, I thought I might, not without reason, ascend as high as to Romulus, being brought by my history so near to his time.

Considering therefore with myself

Whom shall I set so great a man to face?
Or whom oppose? who’s equal to the place?

(as Aeschylus expresses it), I found none so fit as him that peopled the beautiful and far-famed city of Athens, to be set in opposition with the father of the invincible and renowned city of Rome. Let us hope that Fable may, in what shall follow, so submit to the purifying processes of Reason as to take the character of exact history. In any case, however, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers, and such as will receive with indulgence the stories of antiquity.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars. Both of them, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage, had the repute of being sprung from the gods.

Both warriors; that by all the world’s allowed.

Both of them united with strength of body an equal vigor mind; and of the two most famous cities of the world the one built Rome, and the other made Athens be inhabited. Both stand charged with the rape of women; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home; but towards the close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen, if, that is, we may take the stories least like poetry as our guide to the truth. ~ ~


"Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman"                 (P/GC/S/abT + "-arallel Lives"/P)                "Parallel Lives"


1.             To <the> Right Honourable Mr. PITT. SIR

"To Right Honourable Mr. PITT. SIR"               (Th/GC/S/abT + eseus/P)                 Theseus

2.             NEVER poor Wight of <a> Dedicator had less hopes from his Dedication

"NEVER poor Wight of Dedicator had less hopes from his Dedication"               ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "As geographers"/P)                "As geographers"

3.
"than I have from this of mine"               (S/GC/S/abT + osius/P)                Sosius

4. crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about --- for it is written in <a> bye corner of <the> kingdom

"for it is written in bye corner of kingdom"               (cr/GC/S/abT + "-owd into edges of their maps parts of world which they do not know about"/P)                "crowd into edges of their maps parts of world which they do not know about"

5.          adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect --- and in <a> retired thatch’d house

"and in retired thatch’d house"               ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "adding notes in margin to effect"/P)                "adding notes in margin to effect"

Et cetera                 as below.


Theseus - (To <the> Right Honourable Mr. PITT. SIR) --
As geographers - (NEVER poor Wight of <a> Dedicator had less hopes from his Dedication) --, Sosius - (than I have from this of mine) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (for it is written in <a> bye corner of <the> kingdom) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (and in <a> retired thatch’d house) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - (where I live in <a> constant endeavour to fence against <the> infirmities of ill health) --, unapproachable bogs - (and other evils of life) --, Scythian ice - (by mirth) --, or <a> frozen sea - (being firmly persuaded that every time <a> man smiles) --, so - (but much more so) --, in this work of mine - (when he laughs) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (that it adds something to this Fragment of Life) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (I humbly beg) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (Sir) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (that you will honour this book by taking it) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (not under your Protection) --; there is no credit - (it must protect itself) --, or certainty any farther - (but) --. Yet - (into <the> country with you) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (where) --, I thought I might - (if I am ever told) --, not without reason - (it has made you smile) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (I shall think myself as happy as <a> minister of state) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (perhaps much happier than any one) --.

Considering therefore with myself

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (one only excepted) --?
Or whom oppose - (that I have ever read or heard of) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (I am) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it) - (great Sir) --, I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (and what is more to your Honour) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (I am) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (good Sir) --, in what shall follow - (Your Well-wisher) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (and most humble Fellow-Subject) --. In any case - (<THE> AUTHOR) --, however - (C HA Pter. I/One.) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (I Wish either my father or my mother) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (or indeed both of them) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (as they were in duty both equally bound to it) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (had minded what they were about when they begot me) --.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars - (had they duly consider’d how much depended upon what they were then doing) --. Both of them - (that not only the production of a rational Being was concern’d in it) --, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage - (but that possibly <the> happy formation and temperature of his body) --, had <the> repute of being sprung from <the> gods - (perhaps his genius and the very cast of his mind) --.

Both warriors - (and) --; that by all <the> world’s allowed - (for aught they knew to <the> contrary) --.

Both of them united with strength of body <an> equal vigor mind - (even <the> fortunes of his whole house might take their turn from <the> humours and dispositions which were then uppermost) --; and of <the> two most famous cities of <the> world <the> one built Rome - (Had they duly weighed and considered all this) --, and <the> other made Athens be inhabited - (and proceeded accordingly) --. Both stand charged with <the> rape of women - (I am verily persuaded I should have made <a> quite different figure in <the> world) --; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home - (from that) --; but towards <the> close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen - (in which <the> reader is likely to see me) --, if - (Believe me) --, that is - (good folks) --, we may take <the> stories least like poetry as our guide to <the> truth - (this is not so inconsiderable <a> thing as many of you may think it) --. ~ ~

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Laurence Sterne's  "Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

"Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-aurence Sterne's work"/S)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

"Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy"                 (P/GC/S/abT + "-arallel Lives"/S)                "Parallel Lives"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a419 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/senjr10h.htm ,  

They order, said I, this matter better in France. - You have been in France? said my gentleman, turning quick upon me, with the most civil triumph in the world. - Strange! quoth I, debating the matter with myself, That one and twenty miles sailing, for ’tis absolutely no further from Dover to Calais, should give a man these rights: - I’ll look into them: so, giving up the argument, - I went straight to my lodgings, put up half a dozen shirts and a black pair of silk breeches, - “the coat I have on,” said I, looking at the sleeve, “will do;” - took a place in the Dover stage; and the packet sailing at nine the next morning, - by three I had got sat down to my dinner upon a fricaseed chicken, so incontestably in France, that had I died that night of an indigestion, the whole world could not have suspended the effects of the droits d’aubaine; - my shirts, and black pair of silk breeches, - portmanteau and all, must have gone to the King of France; - even the little picture which I have so long worn, and so often have told thee, Eliza, I would carry with me into my grave, would have been torn from my neck! - Ungenerous! to seize upon the wreck of an unwary passenger, whom your subjects had beckoned to their coast! - By heaven!  Sire, it is not well done; and much does it grieve me, ’tis the monarch of a people so civilized and courteous, and so renowned for sentiment and fine feelings, that I have to reason with! -

But I have scarce set a foot in your dominions. -

CALAIS.

When I had fished my dinner, and drank the King of France’s health, to satisfy my mind that I bore him no spleen, but, on the contrary, ~ ~

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/chapter1.html ,    

Theseus - (They order) --
As geographers - (said I) --, Sosius - (this matter better in France) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (You have been in France) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (said my gentleman) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - (turning quick upon me) --, unapproachable bogs - (with <the> most civil triumph in <the> world) --, Scythian ice - (Strange) --, or <a> frozen sea - (quoth I) --, so - (debating <the> matter with myself) --, in this work of mine - (That one and twenty miles sailing) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (for ’tis absolutely no further from Dover to Calais) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (should give <a> man these rights) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (I’ll look into them) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (so) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (giving up <the> argument) --; there is no credit - (I went straight to my lodgings) --, or certainty any farther - (put up half <a> dozen shirts and <a> black pair of silk breeches) --. Yet - (<the> coat I have on) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (said I) --, I thought I might - (looking at <the> sleeve) --, not without reason - (will do) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (took <a> place in <the> Dover stage) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (and <the> packet sailing at nine the next morning) --.

Considering therefore with myself

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (by three I had got sat down to my dinner upon <a> fricaseed chicken) --?
Or whom oppose - (so incontestably in France) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (that had I died that night of <an> indigestion) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it) - (<the> whole world could not have suspended <the> effects of <the> droits d’aubaine) --, I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (my shirts) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (and black pair of silk breeches) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (portmanteau and all) --, in what shall follow - (must have gone to <the> King of France) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (even <the> little picture which I have so long worn) --. In any case - (and so often have told thee) --, however - (Eliza) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (I would carry with me into my grave) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (would have been torn from my neck) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (Ungenerous) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (to) --.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars - (seize upon <the> wreck of <an> unwary passenger) --. Both of them - (whom your subjects had beckoned to their coast) --, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage - (By heaven) --, had <the> repute of being sprung from <the> gods - (Sire) --.

Both warriors - (it is not well done) --; that by all <the> world’s allowed - (and much does it grieve me) --.

Both of them united with strength of body <an> equal vigor mind - (’tis the monarch of a people so civilized and courteous) --; and of <the> two most famous cities of <the> world <the> one built Rome - (and so renowned for sentiment and fine feelings) --, and <the> other made Athens be inhabited - (that I have to reason with) --. Both stand charged with <the> rape of women - (But I have scarce set <a> foot in your dominions) --; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home - (CALAIS) --; but towards <the> close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen - (and drank <the> King of France’s health) --, if - (to satisfy my mind that I bore him no spleen) --, that is - (but) --, we may take <the> stories least like poetry as our guide to <the> truth - (on <the> contrary) --. ~ ~

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Laurence Sterne's  "A POLITICAL ROMANCE"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

"POLITICAL ROMANCE"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-aurence Sterne's work"/T)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

"POLITICAL ROMANCE"                 (P/GC/S/abT + "-arallel Lives"/T)                "Parallel Lives"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a419 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/20257/pg20257.html ,    

A POLITICAL ROMANCE, ETC.
SIR,

In my last, for want of something better to write about, I told you what a World of Fending and Proving we have had of late, in this little Village of ours, about an old-cast-Pair-of-black-Plush-Breeches, which John, our Parish-Clerk, about ten Years ago, it seems, had made a Promise of to one Trim, who is our Sexton and Dog-Whipper.—To this you write me Word, that you have had more than either one or two Occasions to know a good deal of the shifty Behaviour of this said Master Trim,— and that you are astonished, nor can you for your Soul conceive, how so worthless a Fellow, and so worthless a Thing into the Bargain, could become the Occasion of such a Racket as I have represented.

Now, though you do not say expressly, you could wish to hear any more about it, yet I see plain enough that I have raised your Curiosity; and therefore, from the same Motive, that I slightly mentioned it at all in my last Letter, I will, in this, give you a full and very circumstantial Account of the whole Affair.

But, before I begin, I must first set you right in one very material Point, in which I have misled you, as to the true Cause of all this Uproar amongst us;—which does not take its Rise, as I then told you, from the Affair of the Breeches;—but, on the contrary, the whole Affair of the Breeches has taken its Rise from it:—To understand which, you must know, that the first Beginning of the Squabble was not between John the Parish-Clerk and Trim the Sexton, but betwixt the Parson of the Parish and the said Master Trim, about an old Watch-Coat, which had many Years hung up in the Church, which Trim had set his Heart upon; and nothing would serve Trim but he must take it home, in order to have it converted into a warm Under-Petticoat for his Wife, and a Jerkin for himself, against Winter; which, in a plaintive Tone, he most humbly begg'd his Reverence would consent to.

I need not tell you, Sir, who have so often felt it, that a Principle of strong Compassion transports a generous Mind sometimes beyond what is strictly right,—the Parson was within an Ace of being an honourable Example of this very Crime;—for no sooner did the distinct Words— Petticoat—poor Wife—warm— ~ ~


http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/chapter1.html ,    

Theseus - (et cetera.) --
As geographers - (SIR) --, Sosius - (In my last) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (for want of something better to write about) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (I told you what <a> World of Fending and Proving we have had of late) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - (in this little Village of ours) --, unapproachable bogs - (about <an> old) --, Scythian ice - (cast) --, or <a> frozen sea - (Pair) --, so - (of) --, in this work of mine - (black) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (Plush) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (Breeches) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (which John) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (our Parish) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (Clerk) --; there is no credit - (about ten Years ago) --, or certainty any farther - (it seems) --. Yet - (had made <a> Promise of to one Trim) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (who is our Sexton and Dog) --, I thought I might - (Whipper) --, not without reason - (To this you write me Word) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (that you have had more than either one or two Occasions to know <a> good deal of <the> shifty Behaviour of this said Master Trim) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (and that you are astonished) --.

Considering therefore with myself

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (nor can you for your Soul conceive) --?
Or whom oppose - (how so worthless <a> Fellow) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (and so worthless <a> Thing into <the> Bargain) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it) - (could become <the> Occasion of such <a> Racket as I have represented) --, I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (Now) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (though you do not say expressly) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (you could wish to hear any more about it) --, in what shall follow - (yet I see plain enough that I have raised your Curiosity) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (and therefore) --. In any case - (from <the> same Motive) --, however - (that I slightly mentioned it at all in my last Letter) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (I will) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (in this) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (give you <a> full and very circumstantial Account of <the> whole Affair) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (But) --.

Theseus seemed to me to resemble Romulus in many particulars - (before I begin) --. Both of them - (I must first set you right in one very material Point) --, born out of wedlock and of uncertain parentage - (in which I have misled you) --, had <the> repute of being sprung from <the> gods - (as to <the> true Cause of all this Uproar amongst us) --.

Both warriors - (which does not take its Rise) --; that by all <the> world’s allowed - (as I then told you) --.

Both of them united with strength of body <an> equal vigor mind - (from <the> Affair of <the> Breeches) --; and of <the> two most famous cities of <the> world <the> one built Rome - (but) --, and <the> other made Athens be inhabited - (on <the> contrary) --. Both stand charged with <the> rape of women - (<the> whole Affair of <the> Breeches has taken its Rise from it) --; neither of them could avoid domestic misfortunes nor jealousy at home - (To understand which) --; but towards <the> close of their lives are both of them said to have incurred great odium with their countrymen - (you must know) --, if - (that <the> first Beginning of <the> Squabble was not between John <the> Parish-Clerk and Trim <the> Sexton) --, that is - (but betwixt <the> Parson of <the> Parish and the said Master Trim) --, we may take <the> stories least like poetry as our guide to <the> truth - (about <an> old Watch-) --.

<The> lineage of Theseus, by his father’s side - (Coat) --, ascends as high as to Erechtheus and <the> first inhabitants of Attica - (which had many Years hung up in <the> Church) --. By his mother’s side he was descended of Pelops- (which Trim had set his Heart upon) --. For Pelops was <the> most powerful of all <the> kings of Peloponnesus - (and nothing would serve Trim but he must take it home) --, not so much by <the> greatness of his riches as <the> multitude of his children - (in order to have it converted into <a> warm Under-Petticoat for his Wife) --, having married many daughters to chief men - (and <a> Jerkin for himself) --, and put many sons in places of command in <the> towns round about him - (against Winter) --. One of whom named Pittheus - (which) --, grandfather to Theseus - (in <a> plaintive Tone) --, was governor of <the> small city of <the> Troezenians - (he most humbly begg'd his Reverence would consent to) --, and had <the> repute of <a> man of <the> greatest knowledge and wisdom of his time - (I need not tell you) --; which then - (Sir) --, it seems - (who have so often felt it) --, consisted chiefly in grave maxims - (that <a> Principle of strong Compassion transports <a> generous Mind sometimes beyond what is strictly right) --, such as <the> poet Hesiod got his great fame by - (<the> Parson was within <an> Ace of being <an> honourable Example of this very Crime) --, in his book of Works and Days - (for no sooner did <the> distinct Words) --. And - (Petticoat) --, indeed - (poor Wife) --, among these is one that they ascribe to Pittheus - (warm) --,— ~ ~

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Laurence Sterne's  "A Mystery with a Moral"    and  Plutarch's "Parallel Lives"

"Mystery with Moral"                 (L/P + "-aurence Sterne's work"/C2)                "Laurence Sterne's work"

"Mystery with Moral"                 (P/P + "-arallel Lives"/C2)                "Parallel Lives"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a419 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1831/pg1831.html ,  
Laurence Sterne
A Mystery with a Moral

Parisian Experience of Parson Yorick, on his "Sentimental Journey"
A RIDDLE

I remained at the gate of the hotel for some time, looking at everyone who passed by, and forming conjectures upon them, till my attention got fixed upon a single object, which confounded all kind of reasoning upon him.

It was a tall figure of a philosophic, serious adult look, which passed and repassed sedately along the street, making a turn of about sixty paces on each side of the gate of the hotel. The man was about fifty-two, had a small cane under his arm, was dressed in a dark drab-colored coat, waistcoat, and breeches, which seemed to have seen some years' service. They were still clean, and there was a little air of frugal propriete throughout him. By his pulling off his hat, and his attitude of accosting a good many in his way, I saw he was asking charity; so I got a sous or two out of my pocket, ready to give him as he took me in his turn. He passed by me without asking anything, and yet he did not go five steps farther before he asked charity of a little woman. I was much more likely to have given of the two. He had scarce done with the woman, when he pulled his hat off to another who was coming the same way. An ancient gentleman came slowly, and after him a young smart one. He let them both pass and asked nothing. I stood observing him half an hour, in which time he had made a dozen turns backward and forward, and found that he invariably pursued the same plan. ~ ~


http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/ ,    
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/p/plutarch/lives/chapter1.html ,    

Theseus - (Parisian Experience of Parson Yorick) --
As geographers - (on his) --, Sosius - (Sentimental Journey) --, crowd into <the> edges of their maps parts of <the> world which they do not know about - (<A> RIDDLE) --, adding notes in <the> margin to <the> effect - (I remained at <the> gate of <the> hotel for some time) --, that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts - (looking at everyone who passed by) --, unapproachable bogs - (and forming conjectures upon them) --, Scythian ice - (till my attention got fixed upon <a> single object) --, or <a> frozen sea - (which confounded all kind of reasoning upon him) --, so - (It was <a> tall figure of <a> philosophic) --, in this work of mine - (serious adult look) --, in which I have compared <the> lives of <the> greatest men with one another - (which passed and repassed sedately along <the> street) --, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find <a> footing in - (making <a> turn of about sixty paces on each side of <the> gate of <the> hotel) --, I might very well say of those that are farther off - (<The> man was about fifty) --, Beyond this there is nothing but prodigies and fictions - (two) --, <the> only inhabitants are <the> poets and inventors of fables - (had <a> small cane under his arm) --; there is no credit - (was dressed in <a> dark drab) --, or certainty any farther - (colored coat) --. Yet - (waistcoat) --, after publishing <an> account of Lycurgus <the> lawgiver and Numa <the> king - (and breeches) --, I thought I might - (which seemed to have seen some years' service) --, not without reason - (They were still clean) --, ascend as high as to Romulus - (and there was <a> little air of frugal propriete throughout him) --, being brought by my history so near to his time - (By his pulling off his hat) --.

Considering therefore with myself

Whom shall I set so great <a> man to face - (and his attitude of accosting <a> good many in his way) --?
Or whom oppose - (I saw he was asking charity) --? who’s equal to <the> place - (so I got <a> sous or two out of my pocket) --?

(as Aeschylus expresses it) - (ready to give him as he took me in his turn) --, I found none so fit as him that peopled <the> beautiful and far-famed city of Athens - (He passed by me without asking anything) --, to be set in opposition with <the> father of <the> invincible and renowned city of Rome - (and yet he did not go five steps farther before he asked charity of <a> little woman) --. Let us hope that Fable may - (I was much more likely to have given of <the> two) --, in what shall follow - (He had scarce done with <the> woman) --, so submit to <the> purifying processes of Reason as to take <the> character of exact history - (when he pulled his hat off to another who was coming <the> same way) --. In any case - (<an> ancient gentleman came slowly) --, however - (and after him <a> young smart one) --, where it shall be found contumaciously slighting credibility - (He let them both pass and asked nothing) --, and refusing to be reduced to anything like probable fact - (I stood observing him half <an> hour) --, we shall beg that we may meet with candid readers - (in which time he had made <a> dozen turns backward and forward) --, and such as will receive with indulgence <the> stories of antiquity - (and found that he invariably pursued <the> same plan) --.

Et cetera.

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537Simple viewJoseph Conrad,  Lawrence/Hogarth,  Flinders Petrie,  Amelia Edwards,  Gaston Maspero,  Nathaniel Hawthorne Y... 2011.10.21
536Simple view    George Bernard Shaw,        William Archer,  Alfred Sutro,  Maurice Maeterlinck,  Henrik Ibsen,   Maupassant Y... 2011.10.15
535Simple viewBalzac,  Charles Dickens,    Leo Tolstoy,  Fyodor Dostoevsky,   Pushkin/Gogol/Gorky/Turgenev,  Anton Chekhov Y... 2011.10.12
534Simple viewJohn Dryden,  Jonathan Swift,  Alexander Pope,  William Cowper,  John Fletcher,       Walter Scott,     Stendhal Y... 2011.10.05
533Simple viewPliny the Younger,  Petronius, Tacitus,     Martial,  Silius Italicus, Quintilian,     Seneca,   William Lisle Bowles Y... 2011.09.29
532Simple viewSamuel Taylor Coleridge,  William Wordsworth,  Emerson,    Virgil/Ovid/Horace/Statius,   Suetonius,  Juvenal Y... 2011.09.26
531Simple viewAugust Bebel,  Herbert Spencer,            Charles Darwin,        Jean-Baptiste Lamarck,     Thomas Henry Huxley Y... 2011.09.23
530Simple viewEdmund Spenser, Franz Liszt,  Victor Hugo, Alphonse de Lamartine, Heinrich Heine,  Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels Y... 2011.09.17
529Simple viewLilly/Tasso, James Henry Leigh Hunt, Samuel Daniel, Martha Foote Crow, Claudio Monteverdi,  Richard Wagner Y... 2011.09.04
528Simple viewRobert Herrick, Samuel Pepys, William Caxton, Henry B. Wheatley, Swinburne, Christina Rossetti,   Vampyre Y... 2011.09.01
527Simple viewHeinrich Bullinger,  Johannes Brenz,  Georg Joachim Rheticus,  Philipp Melanchthon,  William Alabaster Y... 2011.09.01
526Simple viewPetrus Ramus,  Theodore Beza,  Philip Schaff,  Joachim Westphal,  François Hotman,  'The Right to Heresy' Y... 2011.08.07
525Simple viewAdam Smith,  Cassius Dio,    Stephanus,  William Smith,  Pausanias,  Marcus Aurelius, Diogenes Laërtius Y... 2011.08.03
524Simple view>> Corrected                                <Moralia> Y... 2011.08.31
523Now readingTorricelli, Bernoulli, 'Jean le Rond d'Alembert', Diderot, 'Ephraim Chambers', 'Pierre Bayle', 'Laurence Sterne' Y... 2011.07.26
522Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
521Simple viewHero/Vitruvius Apollonius/Diophantus/Theon,       d'Aguilon, 'John Aubrey', 'François Viète', Oughtred/Pascal Y... 2011.07.21
520Simple viewCusa/Nunes/Vesalius/Borelli, 'de Vere', Stanley,  Vinci/Michelangelo/Raphael, 'Luca Pacioli',   Vasari/Alberti Y... 2011.07.12
519Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.24
518Simple viewGuicciardini, 'Pico della Mirandola', Frisius*, Nostradamus, 'Sir Philip Sidney', Milton/Chaucer/Boiardo/Cardano Y... 2011.07.05
517Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
516Simple viewShelley/Keats/Byron/Castelli/Orta/Wycliffe/Huss,  'Mary Sidney',  Baïf/Montaigne/Buchanan, 'Marie de Gournay' Y... 2011.07.01
515Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
514Simple viewMarlowe/Nashe/Chapman, 'Ben Jonson', 'Beaumont & Fletcher', Marston/Fleay/Glapthorne/Warburton/Brome Y... 2011.06.24
513Simple viewVarro/Catullus/Livy/Sallust,   Ovid/Apuleius/Horace/Lucretius,      Calvin/Servetus/Zwingli/Cranmer/Luther Y... 2011.06.19
512Simple viewSavonarola/Colet/Erasmus/Loyola/Ficino/Mirandola/Gracián/Swedenborg/Ockham/Abelard,    Latin,   'Lex Talio' Y... 2011.06.12
511Simple viewTerence/Menippus/Arcesilaus/Theophras-,  Voltaire/Maupertuis/Schiller/Winckelmann/Rochefoucauld/Cervantes Y... 2011.06.07
510Simple viewBoccaccio/Petrarch/Helvétius/Cesare/Malthus,  Say/Gresham,  Machiavelli/Telesio/Boyle/Bacon/Kepler/Brahe Y... 2011.06.04
509Simple viewHerder/Sanai/Hafez,  Dante, 'Adam Smith', 'Richard Cantillon', 'Henry More', ''Isaac Newton', Ricardo/Bentham Y... 2011.06.01
508Simple viewBerkeley, 'Giordano Bruno', Spinoza/Rousseau/Fichte/Hölderlin/Schelling, 'Jakob Böhme', Hamann/Goethe/Vigo Y... 2011.05.29
507Simple view'Thomas Hobbes' 'John Stuart Mill' 'Arthur Schopenhauer' 'Friedrich Nietzsche' Hegel/Kant/Hume/Locke/Leibniz Y... 2011.05.26
506Simple viewGalileo/Orpheus/Argonautica/Strabo,    'Augustine of Hippo', Neoplatonism/Enneads/Cicero/Anselm/Descartes Y... 2011.05.24
505Simple view                              "English    spelling/vocabulary"                   (Korean connection) Y... 2011.05.19
504Simple viewPyrrho/Galen/Avicenna/Averroes/Maimonides, 'Albertus Magnus', 'Thomas Aquinas', 'Duns Scotus', Copernicus Y... 2011.05.17
503Simple viewArchimedes/Aspasia/Euclid/Hipparchus/Hippocrates/Leonidas/Pericles/Ptolemy/Solon/Themistocles/Epicurus Y... 2011.05.14
502Simple view             Phonetic study    on   German/French   words/sentences Y... 2011.05.13
501Simple view'Milesian school'  'Seven Wonders'  Eleatics/sophism/pluralist/Cynics/Stoic/Montesquieu/Suda/eureka/Vitruvius Y... 2011.05.11
500Simple viewAeschylus/Aesop/Euripides/Hesiod,   Homer/Lucian/Menander/Pindar,  Polybius/Sappho/Sophocles, Alcibiades Y... 2011.05.11
499Simple viewThales/Anaximander/Anaximenes/Pythagoras,  Anaxagoras/Empedocles,  Antisthenes/Diogenes/Crates/Zeno Y... 2011.05.07
498Simple view'geologic era'  'Stone Age'   Yahoo/Google   'Know yourself'   introspection   'Seven Sages'   'material monism' Y... 2011.05.05
497Simple viewSocrates/Thucydides/Plutarch/Herodotus/Xenophon/Aristophanes/Plato/Aristotle/Parmenides/Democritus, etc. Y... 2011.05.04
496Simple view                           phonetic analysis on     Buddha  &  Buddhism Y... 2011.05.04
495Simple viewPhonetic analysis on   Hinduism/Veda/Sanskrit/Prakrit/Zoroaster, Manichaeism/Mani,  Bahá'í Faith, Bahá'u'lláh Y... 2011.04.29
494Simple view'net-cutting'  'country music'  'General Zod'      BC/AD  'Independence day'     BCE/CE    '(Before) Common Era' Y... 2011.04.14
493Simple view    'phonetic study on Jesus Christ  &  Moshe'             'Twelve Apostles'              'Hellenistic civilization??' Y... 2011.04.10
492Simple view           translation :           논어(論語)/공자(孔子/Confucius),               etymological analysis Y... 2011.04.08
491Simple view'論語/논어 [non  ŋΛ]  &  Old Testament'       Torah/Pentateuch         'Why Torah, Prophets, Writings, 四書五經' Y... 2011.04.05
490Simple view'lady-in-waiting'  Confucius/Mencius/Laozi/Micius  popcorn  'Generation Y/X'  'Wonder Woman'       I/you    etc. Y... 2011.04.02
489Simple viewfraction/ordinal,   'national flowers'   'Department of State'    'God bless you!'   'daylight saving time'   *BC/AD Y... 2011.03.20
488Simple view"&/and",                  italic,  ride/drive,       Morrison, Messiah/Immanuel,  succeed,     'Virgin Mary'  Joseph Y... 2011.03.15
487Simple view‘Moby-Dick’     'Coca Cola'       pronouns/4,  'Chinese carry-out'     'days of months'     'leap year (day)'   date Y... 2011.03.04
486Simple view'The Star-Spangled Banner'   &   'God Save the Queen'   &    'Land of Hope and Glory';        national anthems Y... 2011.02.10
485Simple view         'La Marseillaise'              Deutschlandlied              'National anthem of Austria' Y... 2013.05.12
484Simple view'Ask not'/America       months  'days of the week'  day/week/month/year  '(the) first'  hamburger  'Super Bowl' Y... 2011.02.09
483Simple view'passive voice'               'shoe-string budget?'  'you know'  'by the way'  'eh/well'  'blood libel'    'last supper' Y... 2011.01.14
482Simple view'Do I know you?'           'Season's Greetings'  'Auld Lang Syne'      'Christian cross,  resurrection'    'Red Cross' Y... 2011.01.08
481Simple view'Moses & Jesus Christ'            Christ/Jesus,   'Christmas card'   'Why Santa is old man'   MoU,      'Three Magi' Y... 2010.12.25
480Simple view"Shakespeare   &  Plutarch"                  'Sir Thomas More'   'G6'     oneself/myself/ourselves/etc.    ID Y... 2010.12.23
479Simple view'Why wedding dresses are white'              Halloween/제사,  denim, angel(s), eve, Ivy/steak, 'Rhode Island' Y... 2010.12.19
478Simple viewThanksgiving-day,         SantaClaus,           countries,      "silent letter??"     waffle/빈대떡/cupcake Y... 2010.11.26
477Simple view>> More considerations on  "silent letter??";     between GRECOnglish & orthodox English pronunciations Y... 2010.11.27
476Simple view"for the people, by the people, of the people"                          "I have a dream"      yes/no Y... 2010.10.10
475Simple view'it :  imp. v.??'              methinks                               Memorial/Mother's Day,    'hat trick'  franchise/may Y... 2010.06.05
474Simple view"Phonetics/linguistics  &  Bible"                                            "dirty Chinese??" Y... 2010.04.20
473Simple view'aui*Λ/o/='        exigency, need/longing, matter, pressure/force, hurry/rush, weight/postulate/concept/picture Y... 2010.04.05
472Simple view>> Corrected:                   [auiΛ]/S/mES, /S/MS;    [auio]/S/mES, /T/mES, /C1/mES;   [aui=]/P/pES Y... 2010.08.14
471Simple viewview/viewpoint, scheme/surmise/lack/economy/feature,  detail/topic,  item/issue,  point/case,  trifle/matter Y... 2010.04.05
470Simple viewaffair/terrific,  spooky/spook, dreadful/fearsome/awesome/traditional,  customary/familiar,  normal/average Y... 2010.04.05
469Simple viewusual/general,  common/routine, standard, apropos, related/relati-,  germane/cognate, tempor-, fly-by-night Y... 2010.04.05
468Simple viewpassing,  fugitive, 'short-lived', transient/ably/momentarily/amplify/stretch,  expand/wax,  augment/raise Y... 2010.04.05
467Simple viewheighten/lengthen,  embarra-/discountena-,  'show up', offend,  chagrin/vex, mortify/abash,  incarna-/personi- Y... 2010.04.05
466Simple viewrepresent/depict,  illustrate/explicate, codify, manifest, rubbish,  malign/libel,  abuse/mar, decry, blacken Y... 2010.04.05
465Simple viewsignificance/fervour/ebullience,  weight/emphasis, distillation/water/dew/perspiration/moisture/spray/bigotry Y... 2010.04.05
464Simple viewchutzpah', fight, payoff, path,  consequences/end, result(s), verdict,  upshot/event, compatible, consonant Y... 2010.04.05
463Simple viewsociable, convivial,  'dyed in the wool', universal, overall,  total/downright, worldwide,  'far-flung', entire Y... 2010.04.05
462Simple viewwhole/patient,  mild/equab-, kind/generali-/interpola-,  sophisticate/pervert, counsel/instruct,  refine/temper Y... 2010.04.05
461Simple viewhype/razzmatazz, razzle-dazzle, spotlight, play-up, write-up,  champion/uphold, develop,  defend, 'plead for' Y... 2010.04.05
460Simple viewhelp,  advocate/recommend,  puzzle/poser, problem, inconsistency, 'closed book', conundrum, fabrication Y... 2010.04.05
459Simple viewforgery/phony, lie(s), fiction, myth,  fake/counterfeit,  takings, arrest/bust,  catching/espial, trappings/bard Y... 2010.04.05
458Simple viewimprisonment/detenti-, seizure,  dignity, 'self-importa-', decorum/etiquet-,  grandeur/prominen-, proprieties Y... 2010.04.05
457Simple viewsolemnities/gravity,  majesties, 'His Honour, etc.',  destitute, 'down and out',  poor, 'bad(ly) off', 'well-off' Y... 2010.04.05
456Simple viewneedy,  short/low, jovial,  lively, 'full of beans', congenial/ratty/peevish,  sour/tart,  surly/churlish, peppery Y... 2010.04.05
455Simple viewtesty/heady/snappish, unlimited/incomparable/peremptory/complain,  grumble/bellyache, carp/kvetch, groan Y... 2010.04.05
454Simple viewwail/soothe,  'relieve (yourself)', soften/mitigate/scold/blame,  correct/chasten, discipline/censure/advertise Y... 2010.04.05
453Simple viewfortis(?) consonants,                                    Short(?) Program,  Democrat/donkey,  Valentine's Day Y... 2010.02.24
452Simple view>>                                              θ/ð/v/f Y... 2014.03.09
451Simple viewDifference between English & GRECOnglish/GC,                                             pronouns,   'Excuse me.' Y... 2010.01.23
450Simple view'Λui*a/o/=', business/craft, work/occupation, call/job, line/field, condition/symptoms/disorder/appointments Y... 2010.01.06
449Simple view>> Corrections:                                               [Λuia] adjective,       [Λui=] /S/SS Y... 2010.09.18
448Simple viewhorseback-riding?    class, label, creature, gull,   figure/dupe, fitting/fit,    worthy/praiseworthy/worthwhile Y... 2010.01.06
447Simple viewcorrect,  toxic/unhealthful,  deadly/destructive, mortal/killing, choice/prime,  'cool, first-class', select/rare Y... 2010.01.06
446Simple viewbrilliant/marvello-, cracking/mega, coolish/aggregate/assemble/accumula-, test/challenge, look at, research Y... 2010.01.06
445Simple viewexaggerate/emphasise/enlarge/inflate/embroider, frighten/scare/stun/alarm, damp/humidness/opacity/dim Y... 2010.01.06
444Simple viewfaintness/funniness/sport/pleasure/cheerfulness/joy,   understanding/affectionateness/toleration/surd/hard Y... 2010.01.06
443Simple viewdire/awful/dreadful/notable, non-specialist, general/easy/simple/plain/significant/suppose/imagine, believe in Y... 2010.01.06
442Simple view'fancy up', feed, 'eat up', graze/pasture/browse,  'dine out', copulate/shag/bonk,  'have a ball', 'have a fuck' Y... 2010.01.06
441Simple view'have a hump', erase, 'cancel out', excise, 'wipe out', luxury/extra/art/pleasure/love/density/want/parsimony Y... 2010.01.06
440Simple viewdimension/solidity/impenetrability/terror/animosity/dread/horror/fright/awe/deadline,    value/unchangeability Y... 2010.01.06
439Simple viewconstancy,  merit/irreversibility,  quality/unalterability,  caliber/invariability, bad,  kind/humane, good, favour Y... 2010.01.06
438Simple viewcaring/sharp/risky/parlous/ominous/dicey/insecure/ugly/quiescent/yielding/soft/dutiful/willing, patient/serene Y... 2010.01.06
437Simple viewliberal/prodigal, lax/permissive/tender, constancy/stability, lenient/magnanimo-/free/evolve, generate/render Y... 2010.01.06
436Simple viewguarantee/guaranty, delegate/authorize, trust, transfer/transport, hand/give/pass/capture, charm/bewitch Y... 2010.01.06
435Simple viewattract/fascinate,  entrance/trance,  submit/yield/agree/bend/bow/ailment, malaise/instrument/tool/apropos Y... 2010.01.06
434Simple viewtimely/genuine/lethal/terminal/hostile/fine/willing/affable/commix/terrorize/water, kindliness, hand-out Y... 2010.01.06
433Simple viewEnglish/GRECOnglish accent,                   'Happy Holidays',  season, chemistry?         'primary consonants' Y... 2010.01.04
432Simple view'uia*Λ/o/='            mix/mixture;     blend;     compound/composite/composition;     amalgam/amalgamation Y... 2010.01.04
431Simple view>> Corrected:                                             [uia=] /T/MS, /P/mES Y... 2010.08.13
430Simple viewcoalescence; climax; venture; project; risk; scheme;  benefit/beneficiality;  good(ness);  use; gain; reward Y... 2009.12.25
429Simple viewboon; alert; serious; deep; intellectual; scholarly; fit;    appropriate/expropriate; irregular;    asymmetric(al) Y... 2009.12.01
428Simple viewfraternize; socialize; sacrifice; abandon; renounce; forfeit(ure); jilt; disentangle/untangle; generalize (-ise) Y... 2009.12.01
427Simple viewextrapolate; infer; conclude; 'reason out'; universalize; mind; sense; knowledge; wit; corruption/corruptne- Y... 2009.12.01
426Simple view>> Corrections:          mindfulness/mind, sensuousness/sense, wiseness/wisdom, judiciousness/judgement Y... 2009.12.21
425Simple viewgraft; danger(ousness); chance; prospect; optimality/optimization; gawky/gauche; heavy; earnest; true/H?  Y... 2009.12.01
424Simple viewphysical; manual; base; sanguine; expectant; budget; allowance; finance(s); shove; thrust; nudge; knock Y... 2009.12.01
423Simple viewpush; bump; cause; source; spring; agent; opposite; different; enough/enow; lavish; belligerent; conflicting Y... 2009.12.01
422Simple viewoptimize; behave;   act/react; conduct(ion); acquit ; comport; deliberate; consider; think; ponder; debate Y... 2009.12.01
421Simple viewfrighten; scare; petrify;    interweave; intermingle; commingle; alleviate;    trivialize; untangle; shadiness Y... 2009.12.01
420Simple viewrun;   disclose; divulge; evince; defraud; hoodwink;   impart; promulgate; deteriorate; fundi; wonk;   study Y... 2009.12.01
419Simple view"trick or treat"                                   "air force one" Y... 2009.11.06
418Simple view*  'iau*Λ/o/='      mean(s), aid, advantage, vacuum,    (expressive) style, competition, aggression, intrusion Y... 2009.11.04
417Simple view>> Corrected:              [iauΛ] /P/MS, /S/aES, /C1/SS, /P/mES,   [iauo] /C2/MS, /verb,   [iau=] /P/mES Y... 2010.10.05
416Simple view'ill will',    pugnacity/roundabout/wandering, straightforward/natural/frank/dirty/blue, lavish/full/grace/raise Y... 2009.11.04
415Simple viewadvance/boycott/snub, refrain from, stay away -, spurn, throw out, eject/support/bear, hold up, carry/prop Y... 2009.11.03
414Simple viewfame/honour/glory, trouble(someness), inconvenience/solemness/gravity, earnest(ness), soberness/feeling Y... 2009.11.03
413Simple viewsubmission,   philanthropic(al), gracious, almsgiving, positive, confident, hopeful, upbeat,   real(ly), absolute Y... 2009.11.03
412Simple viewperfect/right/complete/shoot/speed/race/rush/tear/dash/pose/present/create/rise,     lead (to),  result (in) Y... 2009.11.03
411Simple viewsave, rescue, recover, salvage,    bail (out), chafe, rub, scratch, rasp, scrape,    foolish(ness), judg(e)ment Y... 2009.11.03
410Simple viewgrotesquery/unpleasingness/verity,   'true fact?' reality, sensuous/sensual, provocative/delicious/delectable Y... 2009.11.03
409Simple viewsteady/beautiful/scenic, savo(u)ry, federate/merge,   unify/unite, consolidate/mingle/coalesce/save/reserve Y... 2009.11.03
408Simple viewstore/collect/vaporize/gasify/aerate,     sublimate/sublime, transpire/hesitate/waver/delay/pause/wait/falter Y... 2009.11.03
407Simple view'compound noun'                Go go go!   White House, northwest, used car,   African-American,   ball games Y... 2009.10.20
406Simple viewdefault [*]/[h]/[=]                   nightline, below, having,  'So many people, so many minds.'  'Mother’s Day' Y... 2009.10.16
405Simple viewMrs./Miss/Ms./lady,                   principle of (sur)names,                   Kor-/Eng- sentences              color Y... 2009.10.11
404Simple view'=ia*Λ/o/u'         agent/H? height/representative/minister/agent/deputy/summit/peak, fund(s), mutual/trust Y... 2009.10.04
403Simple view>> Corrections:                   [=iaΛ] /S/mES,   [=iau]/P/noun, /C1/mES,    [=iao]/S/aES,   /P/T/C1/mES,  Y... 2010.08.28
402Simple viewtherapeutic,  lavish/healing/restorative, good(s), corrective/temporary/acting/interim,  strain/stress/strenu- Y... 2009.10.04
401Simple view'stand-in',   'fill-in',   farming, country, rural, rustic, agrarian,   complain, moan, bitch, whine, growl, gripe Y... 2009.10.04
400Simple viewsophisticate/school/train/educate/consecrate,  bless/H? monitor,  'check (out)', program(me), info(rmation) Y... 2009.10.04
399Simple view>> Corrections:                                           "45. monitor"     &     "46.  check (out)" Y... 2009.11.27
398Simple viewproof, submission, reverence, observance, density, compact(ed)ness, impenetrability, thick, close, heavy Y... 2009.10.04
397Simple viewsolid, substantial, defenc(s)e, rash, irresponsible, precipitate, prove, support, bear, shoulder, endure, keep Y... 2009.10.04
396Simple viewoscillate/fluctuate/swing/vary/sway/veer, effects, end, results, wake/morosity/gloom, mood(in-), sulk(in-) Y... 2009.10.04
395Simple viewsour(ness), vice/viciousness, cruelty, savage(ry), feminine(ness), sex, female(n-), male(n-), masculine(n-) Y... 2009.10.04
394Simple viewterrific, bodacious(ly), boff(o), 'jim-dandy', hopeful, positive, confident, 'can-do', formal(ly), official, regular Y... 2009.10.04
393Simple viewparlous/perilous, '(de)fend (off)',  'cover up', protect/guard/secure/preserve/furnish,  'fit out', stock/supply Y... 2009.10.04
392Simple viewprovision/provide/serialize, 'set up', arrange/form/order/sort/sicken/disgust/revolt, repel/repulse, 'gross out' Y... 2009.10.04
391Simple view>> Corrections:                                              "set up"          (set) Y... 2010.01.18
390Simple view'Why not Gibson Charles?'          'Mr. Gibson' or 'Gibson mister'        'Your Honour'        'English middle name' Y... 2009.09.19
389Simple view'ia=*Λ/o/u'         supplement,      quest,     philanthropic(al), irritative, humanitarian, affronted, sacrifice Y... 2009.09.15
388Simple view>> Corrected Y... 2010.11.20
387Simple viewabandon(ment), focus, center, finish, do, use, '(be) used to', effect, merit, culture, public, spell/charm/lure Y... 2009.09.15
386Simple viewfair(ness), love(liness), neighbo(u)rly, siz(e)ably, wil(l)fully, corpor(e)al, cordial, futile, troubledly, disturbing Y... 2009.09.15
385Simple viewwildish, wild(ly),   loud(ly), cut, sever, divide,   rend, schism,   separate, cast, throw, project, launch, pitch Y... 2009.09.15
384Simple viewshed, consolidate, combine, unite, join,  marry, amalgamate, boundary, limits, obscurity, negligence/neglect Y... 2009.09.15
383Simple viewirresponsibleness, uncertainty, changeability, rough, crude/petro-, homespun, rough-hew(n), 'stylish person' Y... 2009.09.15
382Simple view'in/on demand'  show, express, display, reveal, register, rouse, cause, fire, prompt, ease, moderate, animate Y... 2009.09.15
381Simple viewgrafting;                  greeting;                 "good-bye"                   "forbidden fruit" Y... 2009.09.11
380Simple viewno/though/yes,         (nein/doch/ja)                    "You like it, do you? ΛV" Y... 2009.09.08
379Simple view>> "Don't you like it?"           "The life must go on."           sniper,          Phoenicia,         freemason Y... 2009.09.18
378Simple view'iaΛ*o/u/='   factor, fundament(al), problematic(al),  '(dangling) participle', loose(ly),  'blue chip', large-sized Y... 2009.09.04
377Simple viewpunctuality, promptness, read(il)y, regular(ity), stead(il)y, consistent(ly),  'Kindly yours',  '(double) genitive' Y... 2009.09.04
376Simple viewsimplicity/easiness/clarity, logic(ality), urgency/importan-, need(fulness), gravity, press(ure), hurry/querulo- Y... 2009.09.04
375Simple viewbad-tempered,     hot-tempered, irascible,    'provide (against/for)', 'fit (in)', 'spy (on)',  follow/i? monitor/H? Y... 2009.09.04
374Simple viewagree/-/i? thunder(bolt), cheat(er), sharper,  'confidence man', pledge/v? committal, promise/v? segmented Y... 2009.09.04
373Simple viewsegregative/augmentative/increasable/protractive/celebrative,  'deal in/with', 'trade in', 'build up', scare/-/i? Y... 2009.09.04
372Simple view'iao*Λ/u/='      position/H?   exposé,      (have) impact/contact/curb/date/elbow/interview/panic/park/verb? Y... 2009.08.26
371Simple view>> Corrected:                                       [iaou] /S/aES Y... 2010.07.09
370Simple viewcare(fulness),  worry/v?   'seeing eye', old/H? passé, circumspect(ive),    'Indian summer',  oldish, enervate Y... 2009.08.26
369Simple viewverity, truth,  'the true',  factuality, tru(thful)ly,     'Sincerely yours', media blitz, clear/whole/H? wholeness Y... 2009.08.26
368Simple viewunity/cohesion, barrenness, aridness/poorer/unproductivity, technological), propitiatory/atonable/reparative Y... 2009.08.26
367Simple viewoblatory, mockable, mock(up), ironic/sneerful/aggravative, exaggeratively, heightened, join/H? 'wrap (up)' Y... 2009.08.26
366Simple view* 'oia*Λ/u/='  'the more - of',      'holy grail', 'more important(ly)', '(the) more universal',      'bachelor party' Y... 2009.08.21
365Simple view>> Corrected :                                      [oiau]/P/MS/noun,  /mES/verb Y... 2010.09.13
364Simple view'Please be seated',  humidness, damp(ness), moistness, bounty,      plenty, profusion, limit(ation), ultimacy Y... 2009.08.21
363Simple viewbest/highest/finest/choicest, 'succumb to', 'catch in', 'contract of', impermanency/transiency/insecureness