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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | brd2 | Kor | book | FUN member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, main :::


596 12 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   Robert Herrick, Samuel Pepys, William Caxton, Henry B. Wheatley, Swinburne, Christina Rossetti,   Vampyre
Robert Herrick (poet)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Robert+Herrick+(poet) ,  

* ("William Alabaster" /S)/C2  >>  ("John Still" /GC/S/abT)/T  >>  ("John Cotta" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T  >>  ("John Racster" /C2)/T  >>  ("Roger Fenton" /C2/Ch)/T  >>  ("Robert Herrick" /S)/T


Born                    baptised 24 August 1591                     Cheapside, London, England
Died                  buried 15 October 1674 (aged 83)              Dean Prior, Devon, England

"1591"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/P)/+bp                   "Robert Herrick"
August                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/P)/+cp                   "Robert Herrick"
"baptised 24"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/P)/Ch/+bp                   "Robert Herrick"
"Cheapside, London, England"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/P)/Ch/+cp                   "Robert Herrick"

"1674"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/T)/+bp                   "Robert Herrick"
October                  (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/T)/+cp                   "Robert Herrick"
"buried 15"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/T)/Ch/+bp                   "Robert Herrick"
"Dean Prior, Devon, England"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick"/T)/Ch/+cp                   "Robert Herrick"

>>       printed in 1648 under the title Hesperides;    or the Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick, with a dedication to the Prince of Wales.

Hesperides                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick, with dedication to Prince of Wales"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+cp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"
"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick Eaq."                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+bp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

Hesperides                       ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/T)                       Odyssey

>>     Noble Numbers, spiritual works, published together in 1648

"Noble Numbers, spiritual works"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/P)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Noble Numbers"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/P)/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Noble Numbers, spiritual works"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/P)                   Odyssey

>>      Herrick sets out his subject-matter in the poem he printed at the beginning of his collection, The Argument of his Book.
A selection from the lyrical poems of Robert Herrick

"Argument of his Book"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"selection from lyrical poems of Robert Herrick"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)/+bp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"
CHRYSOMELA                  (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Argument of his Book"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/C2)                   Odyssey


>>        metaphysical poets such as John Donne and Andrew Marvell

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Donne ,  
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Andrew+Marvell ,  
*     ("Robert Herrick" /S)/T  >>  ("John Donne" /T)/P  >>  ("Andrew Marvell" /T/Ch)/P


>>       The Victorian poet Swinburne

Swinburne                        (R/T + "-obert Herrick"/C2)                      "Robert Herrick"


>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Robert Herrick's  Hesperides  and  Homer's  Odyssey


Hesperides                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick, with dedication to Prince of Wales"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+cp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"
"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick Eaq."                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+bp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

Hesperides                       ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/T)                       Odyssey


http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider
I.
The Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among the
suitors. She has taken the form of Mentes, the King of a neighboring
tribe; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth.
Who will recognize her? Not the suitors; they can see no God in their
condition, least of all, the Goddess of Wisdom. "Telemachus was much
the first to observe her;" why just he? The fact is he was ready to see
her, and not only to see her, but to hear what she had to say. "For he
sat among the suitors grieved in heart, seeing his father in his mind's
eye," like Hamlet just before the latter saw the ghost. So careful is
the poet to prepare both sides--the divine epiphany, and the mortal who
is to behold it.

Furthermore, the young man saw his father "scattering the suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house." This is just what
the Goddess is going to tell with a new sanction, and it is just what
is going to happen in the course of the poem. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him. Throughout the whole interview the two main facts are
the example of the parent and the final revenge, both of which are
urged by the Goddess without and by the man within.

Still there is a difference. Telemachus is despondent; we might almost
say, he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of the world. "The
Gods plot evil things" against the House of Ulysses, whose fate "they
make unknown above that of all men." Then they have sent upon me these
suitors who consume my heritage. The poor boy has had a hard time; he
has come to question providence in his misery, and discredits the
goodness of the Gods.

Here, now, is the special function of Pallas. She instills courage into
his heart. ~ ~


http://herrick.ncl.ac.uk/Hesperides%20and%20His%20Noble%20Numbers.txt ,    
Ovid.
Effugient avidos Carmina nostra Rogos.

TO THE MOST
ILLVSTRIOVS,
AND
Most Hopefull Prince,
CHARLES,
Prince of Wales.
 
      
Well may my Book come forth like Publique Day
When such a Light as You are leads the way:
Who are my Works Creator, and alone
The Flame of it, and the Expansion.
And look how all those heavenly Lamps acquire
Light from the Sun, that inexhausted Fire:
So all my Morne, and Evening Stars from You
Have their Existence, and their Influence too.
Full is my Book of Glories; but all These
By You become Immortall Substances.

For these Transgressions which thou here dost see,
Condemne the Printer, Reader, and not me;
Who gave him forth good Grain, though he mistook
The Seed; so sow'd these Tares throughout my Book.
 
HESPERIDES:
 
The Argument of his Book.

I sing of Brooks, of Blossomes, Birds, and Bowers:
Of April, May, of June, and July-Flowers. ~ ~


Hesperides                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick, with dedication to Prince of Wales"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+cp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"
"Works both Human and Divine of Robert Herrick Eaq."                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/T)/+bp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

Hesperides                       ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/T)                       Odyssey



1.
Ovid                          (B/GC/S/abT + "-ook First"/T)                           "Book First"

2.       <The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the> suitors

"Effugient avidos Carmina nostra Rogos"                 (G/GC/S/abT + "-oddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"/T)                  "Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"

3.            She has taken <the> form of Mentes --- TO <the> MOST ILLVSTRIOVS

"TO MOST ILLVSTRIOVS"                 (Sh/GC/S/abT + "-e has taken form of Mentes"/T)                  "She has taken form of Mentes"

4.                 <the> King of a neighboring tribe

"AND Most Hopefull Prince"                 (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing of neighboring tribe"/T)                  "King of neighboring tribe"

5.
CHARLES                (sh/GC/S/abT + "-e is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"/T)                  "she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"

6.
"Prince of Wales"                 (Wh/GC/S/abT + "-o will recognize her"/T)                  "Who will recognize her"

7. Not <the> suitors --- Well may my Book come forth like Publique Day When such <a> Light as You are leads <the> way

"Well may my Book come forth like Publique Day When such Light as You are leads way"                 (N/GC/S/abT + "-ot suitors"/T)                  "Not suitors"

8.
"Who are my Works Creator"                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-ey can see no God in their condition"/T)                  "they can see no God in their condition"

9.                   and alone <The> Flame of it

"and alone Flame of it"                 (l/GC/S/abT + "-east of all"/T)                  "least of all"

10.             <the> Goddess of Wisdom --- and <the> Expansion

"and Expansion"                 (G/GC/S/abT + "-oddess of Wisdom"/T)                  "Goddess of Wisdom"

11. Telemachus was much <the> first to observe her --- And look how all those heavenly Lamps acquire Light from <the> Sun

"And look how all those heavenly Lamps acquire Light from Sun"                 (T/GC/S/abT + "-elemachus was much first to observe her"/T)                  "Telemachus was much first to observe her"

12.
"that inexhausted Fire"                 (why/GC/S/abT + "just he"/T)                  "why just he"

13.                <The> fact is he was ready to see her

"So all my Morne"                 (f/GC/S/abT + "-act is he was ready to see her"/T)                  "fact is he was ready to see her"

14.
"and Evening Stars from You Have their Existence"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and not only to see her"/T)                  "and not only to see her"

15.
"and their Influence too"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut to hear what she had to say"/T)                  "but to hear what she had to say"

16.               For he sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart

"Full is my Book of Glories"                 (F/GC/S/abT + "-or he sat among suitors grieved in heart"/T)                  "For he sat among suitors grieved in heart"

17.
"but all These By You become Immortall Substances"                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-eeing his father in his mind's eye"/T)                  "seeing his father in his mind's eye"

18.              like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw the ghost

"For these Transgressions which thou here dost see"                 (l/GC/S/abT + "-ike Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"/T)                  "like Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"

19.         So careful is <the> poet to prepare both sides --- Condemne <the> Printer

"Condemne Printer"                 (S/GC/S/abT + "-o careful is poet to prepare both sides"/T)                  "So careful is poet to prepare both sides"

20.                 <the> divine epiphany

Reader                    (d/GC/S/abT + "-ivine epiphany"/T)                     "divine epiphany"

21.             and <the> mortal who is to behold it

"and not me"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and mortal who is to behold it"/T)                  "and mortal who is to behold it"

22.
"Who gave him forth good Grain"                 (F/GC/S/abT + urthermore/T)                  Furthermore

23.                <the> young man saw his father --- though he mistook <The> Seed

"though he mistook Seed"                 (y/GC/S/abT + "-oung man saw his father"/T)                  "young man saw his father"

24.               scattering <the> suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house

"so sow'd these Tares throughout my Book"                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-cattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"/T)                  "scattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"

25.               This is just what <the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction

HESPERIDES                 (Th/GC/S/abT + "-is is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"/T)                  "This is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"

26.  and it is just what is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem --- <The> Argument of his Book

"Argument of his Book"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"/T)                  "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"

27.
"I sing of Brooks"                 (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-uly Telemachus is prepared internally"/T)                  "Truly Telemachus is prepared internally"

28.
"of Blossomes"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-e has already everything within him which is to come out of him"/T)                  "he has already everything within him which is to come out of him"

29. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are <the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge

Birds                 (Th/GC/S/abT + "-roughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"/T)                  "Throughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"

30.        both of which are urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within

"and Bowers"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-oth of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"/T)                  "both of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"

31.               Still there is <a> difference

"Of April"                 (S/GC/S/abT + "-till there is difference"/T)                  "Still there is difference"

32.
May                 (T/GC/S/abT + "-elemachus is despondent"/T)                  "Telemachus is despondent"

33.
"of June"                 (w/GC/S/abT + "-e might almost say"/T)                  "we might almost say"

34.                   he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world

"and July-Flowers"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-e is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"/T)                  "he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between  Robert Herrick's  "selection from lyrical poems of Robert Herrick"  and  Homer's  Odyssey

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1211/1211-h/1211-h.htm#2H_4_0002 ,    
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/1/2/1/1211/1211.txt ,    
PREFATORY
1. THE ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK
     I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers,
     Of April, May, of June, and July-flowers;
     I sing of May-poles, hock-carts, wassails, wakes,
     Of bride-grooms, brides, and of their bridal-cakes.
     I write of Youth, of Love;—and have access
     By these, to sing of cleanly wantonness;
     I sing of dews, of rains, and, piece by piece,
     Of balm, of oil, of spice, ~ ~

"Argument of his Book"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"selection from lyrical poems of Robert Herrick"                   (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)/+bp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"
CHRYSOMELA                  (R/GC/S/abT + "-obert Herrick's work"/C2)/+cp/Ch                   "Robert Herrick's work"

"Argument of his Book"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Odyssey/C2)                   Odyssey


1.
PREFATORY                     (B/GC/S/abT + "-ook First"/C2)                         "Book First"

2. <The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the> suitors --- <THE> ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK

"ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK"                 (G/GC/S/abT + "-oddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"/C2)                  "Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"

"1/one"                 (G/GC/S/abT + "-oddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"/C2)/Ch                  "Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"

3.            She has taken <the> form of Mentes

"I sing of brooks"                 (Sh/GC/S/abT + "-e has taken form of Mentes"/C2)                  "She has taken form of Mentes"

4.                 <the> King of a neighboring tribe

"of blossoms"                 (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing of neighboring tribe"/C2)                  "King of neighboring tribe"

5.
birds                (sh/GC/S/abT + "-e is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"/C2)                  "she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"

6.
"and bowers"                 (Wh/GC/S/abT + "-o will recognize her"/C2)                  "Who will recognize her"

7.                         Not <the> suitors

"Of April"                       (N/GC/S/abT + "-ot suitors"/C2)                       "Not suitors"

8.
May                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-ey can see no God in their condition"/C2)                  "they can see no God in their condition"

9.
"of June"                       (l/GC/S/abT + "-east of all"/C2)                         "least of all"

10.             <the> Goddess of Wisdom

"and July"                 (G/GC/S/abT + "-oddess of Wisdom"/C2)                  "Goddess of Wisdom"

11.                     Telemachus was much <the> first to observe her

flowers                 (T/GC/S/abT + "-elemachus was much first to observe her"/C2)                  "Telemachus was much first to observe her"

12.
"I sing of May"                 (why/GC/S/abT + "just he"/C2)                  "why just he"

13.                <The> fact is he was ready to see her

poles                 (f/GC/S/abT + "-act is he was ready to see her"/C2)                  "fact is he was ready to see her"

14.
hock                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and not only to see her"/C2)                  "and not only to see her"

15.
carts                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut to hear what she had to say"/C2)                  "but to hear what she had to say"

16.               For he sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart

wassails                 (F/GC/S/abT + "-or he sat among suitors grieved in heart"/C2)                  "For he sat among suitors grieved in heart"

17.
wakes                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-eeing his father in his mind's eye"/C2)                  "seeing his father in his mind's eye"

18.              like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost

"Of bride"                 (l/GC/S/abT + "-ike Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"/C2)                  "like Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"

19.         So careful is <the> poet to prepare both sides

grooms                 (S/GC/S/abT + "-o careful is poet to prepare both sides"/C2)                  "So careful is poet to prepare both sides"

20.                 <the> divine epiphany

brides                    (d/GC/S/abT + "-ivine epiphany"/C2)                    "divine epiphany"

21.             and <the> mortal who is to behold it

"and of their bridal"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and mortal who is to behold it"/C2)                  "and mortal who is to behold it"

22.
cakes                         (F/GC/S/abT + urthermore/C2)                           Furthermore

23.                <the> young man saw his father

"I write of Youth"                 (y/GC/S/abT + "-oung man saw his father"/C2)                  "young man saw his father"

24.               scattering <the> suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house

"of Love"                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-cattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"/C2)                  "scattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"

25.               This is just what <the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction

"and have access By these"                 (Th/GC/S/abT + "-is is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"/C2)                  "This is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"

26.              and it is just what is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem

"to sing of cleanly wantonness"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"/C2)                  "and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"

27.
"I sing of dews"                 (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-uly Telemachus is prepared internally"/C2)                  "Truly Telemachus is prepared internally"

28.
"of rains"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-e has already everything within him which is to come out of him"/C2)                  "he has already everything within him which is to come out of him"

29. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are <the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge

and                 (Th/GC/S/abT + "-roughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"/C2)                  "Throughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"

30.        both of which are urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within

"piece by piece"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-oth of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"/C2)                  "both of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"

31.               Still there is <a> difference

"Of balm"                 (S/GC/S/abT + "-till there is difference"/C2)                  "Still there is difference"

32.
"of oil"                 (T/GC/S/abT + "-elemachus is despondent"/C2)                  "Telemachus is despondent"

33.
"of June"                 (w/GC/S/abT + "-e might almost say"/C2)                  "we might almost say"

34.                   he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of <the> world

"of spice"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-e is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"/C2)                  "he is getting to disbelieve in any divine order of world"

Et cetera.



Samuel Pepys
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Pepys ,  

* ("Andrew Marvell" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Samuel Pepys" /C2)/P  >>  Pepys (pronounced /piːps/ "peeps")/GC/S/abT

Born                               23 February 1633                       London, England
Died                           26 May 1703 (aged 70)                     Clapham, England

"1633"                         (S/T + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/+bp                     "Samuel Pepys"
February                       (S/T + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/+cp                     "Samuel Pepys"
"23"                        (S/T + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/Ch/+bp                     "Samuel Pepys"
"London, England"               (S/T + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/Ch/+cp                "Samuel Pepys"

"1703"                         (S/P + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/+bp                     "Samuel Pepys"
May                            (S/P + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/+cp                     "Samuel Pepys"
"26"                        (S/P + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/Ch/+bp                     "Samuel Pepys"
"Clapham, England"                 (S/P + "-amuel Pepys"/C2)/Ch/+cp                "Samuel Pepys"

>>                  The diary

"Diary of Samuel Pepys"                (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys' work"/S)                "Samuel Pepys' work"
Diary                   (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys' work"/S)/Ch                  "Samuel Pepys' work"

"Diary of Samuel Pepys"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)                         Iliad

>>        Incunabula by William Caxton, Wynkyn de Worde and Richard Pynson

"William Caxton"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+bp                   "Samuel Pepys"
"Wynkyn de Worde"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+cp                   "Samuel Pepys"
"Richard Pynson"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+cp/Ch                   "Samuel Pepys"

>>             Henry B. Wheatley

"Henry B. Wheatley"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+bp/Ch                   "Samuel Pepys"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Samuel Pepys'  "Diary of Samuel Pepys"    and Homer's Iliad

Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK I.

Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus' son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia's host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)5
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.

Who them to strife impell'd? What power divine?10
Latona's son and Jove's.[1] For he, incensed
004 Against the King, a foul contagion raised
In all the host, and multitudes destroy'd,
For that the son of Atreus had his priest
Dishonored, Chryses. To the fleet he came15
Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem
His daughter, and his hands charged with the wreath
And golden sceptre[2] of the God shaft-arm'd. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3331/pg3331.html ,    

THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, ESQ., F.R.S.
FROM 1659 TO 1669
WITH MEMOIR

PREFACE TO THE PRESENT EDITION.

The Celebrated work here presented to the public under peculiar advantages may require a few introductory remarks.

By the publication, during the last half century, of autobiographies, Diaries, and Records of Personal Character; this class of literature has been largely enriched, not only with works calculated for the benefit of the student, but for that larger class of readers—the people, who in the byeways of History and Biography which these works present, gather much of the national life at many periods, and pictures of manners and customs, habits and amusements, such as are not so readily to be found in more elaborate works.

The Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn, published in the year 1817, ~ ~


"Diary of Samuel Pepys"                (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys' work"/S)                "Samuel Pepys' work"
Diary                   (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys' work"/S)/Ch                  "Samuel Pepys' work"

"Diary of Samuel Pepys"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)                         Iliad


1.  
"ESQ"                                  (BOOK /C2 + one/S)                            "BOOK one"

2.
F                          ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Achilles sing"/S)                         "Achilles sing"

3.
R                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "O Goddess! Peleus' son"/S)                   "O Goddess! Peleus' son"

4.
S                      (H/C2 + "-is wrath pernicious"/S)                      "His wrath pernicious"

5.    
"FROM 1659 TO 1669"                   (wh/C2 + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/S)                   "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

6.     sent many <a> soul Illustrious into Ades premature --- PREFACE TO <THE> PRESENT EDITION

"PREFACE TO PRESENT EDITION"                   (s/C2 + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/S)                   "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

7. <The> Celebrated work here presented to <the> public under peculiar advantages may require <a> few introductory remarks

"Celebrated work here presented to public under peculiar advantages may require few introductory remarks"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And Heroes gave"/S)                   "And Heroes gave"

8.              (so stood <the> will of Jove) --- By <the> publication

"By publication"                   (s/C2 + "-o stood will of Jove"/S)                   "so stood will of Jove"

9.              To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey --- during <the> last half century

"during last half century"                   ("To d"/C2 + "-ogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/S)                   "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

10.       When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus

"of autobiographies"                   (Wh/C2 + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/S)                   "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

11.
Diaries                         ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Agamemnon/S)                        Agamemnon

12.
"and Records of Personal Character"                   (K/C2 + "-ing of men"/S)                   "King of men"

13.
"this class of literature has been largely enriched"                   (Wh/C2 + "-o them to strife impell'd"/S)                   "Who them to strife impell'd"

14.                  not only with works calculated for <the> benefit of <the> student

"not only with works calculated for benefit of student "                   (Wh/C2 + "-at power divine"/S)                   "What power divine"

15.
"but for that larger class of readers"                   (L/C2 + "-atona's son and Jove's"/S)                   "Latona's son and Jove's"

16.                      <the> people

people                                     (F/C2 + "-or he"/S)                              "For he"

17. incensed Against <the> King --- who in <the> byeways of History and Biography which these works present

"who in byeways of History and Biography which these works present"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "incensed Against King"/S)                   "incensed Against King"

18.     <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host --- gather much of <the> national life at many periods

"gather much of national life at many periods"                   (f/C2 + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/S)                   "foul contagion raised In all host"

19.
"and pictures of manners and customs"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and multitudes destroy'd"/S)                   "and multitudes destroy'd"

20.        For that <the> son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored

"habits and amusements"                   (F/C2 + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/S)                   "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

21.
"such as are not so readily to be found in more elaborate works"                   (Chrys/C2 + es/S)                   Chryses

22. To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter --- <The> Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn

"Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn"                   (T/C2 + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/S)                   "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughte"

23. and his hands charged with the wreath And golden sceptre of the God shaft-arm'd --- published in <the> year 1817

"published in year 1817"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"/S)                   "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"

Et cetera.



William Caxton
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Caxton ,  

"William Caxton"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+bp                   "Samuel Pepys"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c#a3627 ,  
•  Dialogues in French and English (English) (as Author)
•  Game and Playe of the Chesse
A Verbatim Reprint of the First Edition, 1474 (English) (as Author)
•  Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books
with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations (English) (as Contributor)

Dialogues                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/+bp                   "William Caxton's work"
"Dialogues in French and English"                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/+cp                   "William Caxton's work"

"Game and Playe of Chesse"                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/Ch                   "William Caxton's work"

"Prefaces and Prologues"                    (W/P + "-illiam Caxton's work"/C2)                   "William Caxton's work"
"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books"                    (W/P + "-illiam Caxton's work"/C2)/Ch                   "William Caxton's work"


Dialogues                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)/+bp                   "Essays and miscellanies"
"Game and Playe of Chesse"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)/Ch                   "Essays and miscellanies"
"Prefaces and Prologues"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)                   "Essays and miscellanies"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    William Caxton's  "Dialogues (in French and English)"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29214/29214-h/29214-h.htm ,    
Dialogues in French and English.
(Adapted from a Fourteenth-Century Book of Dialogues in French and Flemish.)

[Or ‘A Book for Travellers,’ Typ. Ant. i. 315: or ‘A Vocabulary,’ Blades, ii. 133.]

ENGLISSH --- FRENSSHE
Hier begynneth the table --- Cy commence la table

Of this prouffytable lernynge, --- De cest prouffytable doctrine
For to fynde all by ordre --- Pour trouuer tout par ordene
That whiche men wylle lerne. --- Ce que on vouldra aprendre.

3 Fyrst, the callyng of the trinite; --- Premierment, linuocacion de la trinite;
4 How every man ought grete othir; --- Comment on doibt chescun saluer;
6 The catayllys langyng to the house; --- Les meubles aual la mayson;
10 The names of flessh and of bestis; --- Les noms des chars & de beestes1;
10 And of byrdes tame and wylde; --- Et doysiaulz priues & sauuages
11 The names of fysshes of the see;--- Les noms des poyssons de mer;
12 And of fysshes of the Riuers; --- Et des poyssons des Ryuiers;
12 The names of whyte mete; --- Les noms de compenaiges;
13 The names of the fruytes of trees; --- Les noms des fruis darbres;
13 The names of diuerse trees; --- Les noms des pluiseurs arbres;
13 The names of potages; --- Les noms des potages;
14 The names of comyn drynkes; --- Les noms des communs beuurages;
14 The marchandise of clothe --- La marchandyse des draps
18 Of diuerse tounes and fayres; --- Des diuerses villes et festes;
19 The marchandyse of wulle; --- Les marchandises des laines;

Et cetera.


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a342 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3052 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3052/3052-h/3052-h.htm ,  
Essays and Miscellanies by Plutarch

PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS
THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO LIVE PLEASURABLY ACCORDING TO THE DOCTRINE OF EPICURUS.
PLUTARCH, ZEUXIPPUS, THEON, ARISTODEMUS.
Epicurus's great confidant and familiar, Colotes, set forth a book with this title to it, that according to the tenets of the other philosophers it is impossible to live. Now what occurred to me then to say against him, in the defence of those philosophers, hath been already put into writing by me. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in the walks in further opposition to his party, I thought it not amiss to recollect them also, if for no other reason, yet for this one, that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over the discourses and writings of those they would disprove, nor by tearing out one word here and another there, or by falling foul upon particular passages without the books, to impose upon the ignorant and unlearned.

Now as we were leaving the school to take a walk (as our manner is) in the gymnasium, Zeuxippus began to us: In my opinion, said he, the debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting. ~ ~


Dialogues                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/+bp                   "William Caxton's work"
"Dialogues in French and English"                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/+cp                   "William Caxton's work"

Dialogues                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)/+bp                   "Essays and miscellanies"


1.          Adapted from <a> Fourteenth-Century Book of Dialogues in French and Flemish

"Adapted from Fourteenth-Century Book of Dialogues in French and Flemish"                (ph/C2 + "-ilosophical essays"/P)/+bp                "philosophical essays"

2. that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus --- Or ‘<A> Book for Travellers’

"Or Book for Travellers"                (th/C2 + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/P)/+bp                "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.
Typ                                   (P/C2 + lutarch/P)/+bp                               Plutarch

4.
Ant                                  (Z/C2 + euxippus/P)/+bp                            Zeuxippus

5.
i                                       (Th/C2 + eon/P)/+bp                                  Theon

6.
"315"                       ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Aristodemus/P)/+bp                      Aristodemus

7.                   or ‘<A> Vocabulary’

"or Vocabulary"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/P)/+bp                "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
Blades                                (C/C2 + olotes/P)/+bp                                Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

"ii"                (s/C2 + "-et forth book with this title to it"/P)/+bp                "set forth book with this title to it"

10.     that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

"133"                (th/C2 + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/P)/+bp                "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.
ENGLISSH                (N/C2 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/P)/+bp                "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

FRENSSHE               (N/C1 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/P)/+bp                "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12. in <the> defence of those philosophers --- Hier begynneth <the> table Of this prouffytable lernynge

"Hier begynneth table Of this prouffytable lernynge"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in defence of those philosophers"/P)/+bp                "in defence of those philosophers"

"Cy commence la table De cest prouffytable doctrine"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "in defence of those philosophers"/P)/+bp                "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
"For to fynde all by ordre That whiche men wylle lerne"                (h/C2 + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/P)/+bp                "hath been already put into writing by me"

"Pour trouuer tout par ordene Ce que on vouldra aprendre"                (h/C2 + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/P)/+bp                "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party

Fyrst                (B/C2 + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/P)/+bp                "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

Premierment                (B/C1 + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/P)/+bp                "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.               <the> callyng of <the> trinite,      linuocacion de <la> trinite

"callyng of trinite"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/P)/+bp                "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

"linuocacion de trinite"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/P)/+bp                "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
"How every man ought grete othir"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "if for no other reason"/P)/+bp                "if for no other reason"

"Comment on doibt chescun saluer"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "if for no other reason"/P)/+bp                "if for no other reason"

17.              <The> catayllys langyng to <the> house,      <Les> meubles aual <la> mayson

"catayllys langyng to house"                (y/C2 + "-et for this one"/P)/+bp                "yet for this one"

"meubles aual mayson"                (y/C1 + "-et for this one"/P)/+bp                "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove --- <The> names of flessh and of bestis,         <Les> noms des chars & de beestes

"names of flessh and of bestis"                (th/C2 + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/P)/+bp                "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove "

"noms des chars & de beestes"                (th/C1 + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/P)/+bp                "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove "

19.
"And of byrdes tame and wylde"                (n/C2 + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/P)/+bp                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

"Et doysiaulz priues & sauuages"                (n/C1 + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/P)/+bp                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20. or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books --- <The> names of fysshes of <the> see,      <Les> noms des poyssons de mer

"names of fysshes of see"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/P)/+bp                "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

"noms des poyssons de mer"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/P)/+bp                "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21. to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned --- <The> names of whyte mete,     <Les> noms de compenaiges

"names of whyte mete"                (t/C2 + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/P)/+bp                "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

"noms de compenaiges"                (t/C1 + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/P)/+bp                "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22. Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk --- <The> names of <the> fruytes of trees,    <Les> noms des fruis darbres

"names of fruytes of trees"                (N/C2 + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/P)/+bp                "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

"noms des fruis darbres"                (N/C1 + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/P)/+bp                "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.            <The> names of diuerse trees,             <Les> noms des pluiseurs arbres

"names of diuerse trees"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "as our manner is"/P)/+bp                "as our manner is"

"noms des pluiseurs arbres"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "as our manner is"/P)/+bp                "as our manner is"

24.            in <the> gymnasium --- <The> names of potages,       <Les> noms des potages

"names of potages"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in gymnasium"/P)/+bp                "in gymnasium"

"noms des potages"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "in gymnasium"/P)/+bp                "in gymnasium"

25.             <The> names of comyn drynkes --- <Les> noms des communs beuurages

"names of comyn drynkes"                (Z/C2 + "-euxippus began to us"/P)/+bp                "Zeuxippus began to us"

"noms des communs beuurages"                (Z/C1 + "-euxippus began to us"/P)/+bp                "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.              <The> marchandise of clothe,            <La> marchandyse des draps

"marchandise of clothe"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "In my opinion"/P)/+bp                "In my opinion"

"marchandyse des draps"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "In my opinion"/P)/+bp                "In my opinion"

27.
"Of diuerse tounes and fayres"                (s/C2 + "-aid he"/P)/+bp                "said he"

"Des diuerses villes et festes"                (s/C1 + "-aid he"/P)/+bp                "said he"

28. <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting --- <The> marchandyse of wulle,       Les marchandises des laines

"marchandyse of wulle"                (d/C2 + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/P)/+bp                "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

"marchandises des laines"                (d/C1 + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/P)/+bp                "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    William Caxton's  "Game and Playe of Chesse"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/10672/10672-h/10672-h.htm ,  
Game and Playe of Chesse
1474.
A VERBATIM REPRINT OF THE FIRST EDITION.
WITH AN INTRODUCTION
BY
WILLIAM E.A. AXON, M.R.S.L.

"And ther was founde by clerkes full prudent Of the chesse the play most glorious."

Dedication to the Duke of Clarence
To the right noble/ right excellent & vertuous prince George duc of Clarence Erle of warwyck and of salifburye/ grete chamberlayn of Englond & leutenant of Irelond oldest broder of kynge Edward by the grace of god kynge of England and of france/ your most humble servant william Caxton amonge other of your seruantes sendes unto yow peas. helthe. Joye and victorye upon your Enemyes/ Right highe puyssant and redoubted prynce/. For as moche as I haue understand and knowe/ that y'e are enclined unto the comyn wele of the kynge our sayd saueryn lord. his nobles lordes and comyn peple of his noble royame of Englond/ and that y'e sawe gladly the Inhabitants of y'e same enformed in good. vertuous. prouffitable and honeste maners. In whiche your noble persone wyth guydyng of your hows haboundeth/ gyuyng light and ensample unto all other/ Therfore I haue put me in deuour to translate a lityll book late comen in to myn handes out of frensh in to englisshe/ In which I fynde thauctorites. dictees. ~ ~


"Game and Playe of Chesse"                    (W/C2 + "-illiam Caxton's work"/P)/Ch                   "William Caxton's work"

"Game and Playe of Chesse"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)/Ch                   "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"1474"                (ph/C2 + "-ilosophical essays"/P)/Ch                "philosophical essays"

2. that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus --- <A> VERBATIM REPRINT OF <THE> FIRST EDITION

"VERBATIM REPRINT OF FIRST EDITION"                (th/C2 + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/P)/Ch               "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.                WITH <AN> INTRODUCTION BY WILLIAM E

"with introduction by William E"                     (P/C2 + lutarch/P)/Ch                    Plutarch

4.
A                                    (Z/C2 + euxippus/P)/Ch                             Zeuxippus

5.
AXON                                 (Th/C2 + eon/P)/Ch                                   Theon

6.
M                         ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Aristodemus/P)/Ch                         Aristodemus

7.
R                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/P)/Ch                "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
S                                    (C/C2 + olotes/P)/Ch                                  Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

L                (s/C2 + "-et forth book with this title to it"/P)/Ch                "set forth book with this title to it"

10. that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live --- And ther was founde by clerkes full prudent Of <the> chesse <the> play most glorious

"And ther was founde by clerkes full prudent Of chesse play most glorious"                (th/C2 + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/P)/Ch                "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.                  Dedication to <the> Duke of Clarence

Dedication                (N/C2 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/P)/+bp/Ch                "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

"Dedication to Duke of Clarence"                (N/C2 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/P)/+cp/Ch                "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.              in <the> defence of those philosophers --- To <the> right noble

"To right noble"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in defence of those philosophers"/P)/Ch                "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
"right excellent & vertuous prince George duc of Clarence Erle of warwyck and of salifburye"                (h/C2 + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/P)/Ch                "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party --- grete chamberlayn of Englond & leutenant of Irelond oldest broder of kynge Edward by <the> grace of god kynge of England and of france

"grete chamberlayn of Englond & leutenant of Irelond oldest broder of kynge Edward by grace of god kynge of England and of france"                (B/C2 + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/P)/Ch                "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.
"your most humble servant william Caxton amonge other of your seruantes sendes unto yow peas"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/P)/Ch                "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
helthe                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "if for no other reason"/P)/Ch                "if for no other reason"

17.
"Joye and victorye upon your Enemyes"                (y/C2 + "-et for this one"/P)/Ch                "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

"Right highe puyssant and redoubted prynce"                (th/C2 + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/P)/Ch                "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove "

19.
"For as moche as I haue understand and knowe"                (n/C2 + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/P)/Ch                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20. or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books --- that y'e are enclined unto <the> comyn wele of <the> kynge our sayd saueryn lord

"that y'e are enclined unto comyn wele of kynge our sayd saueryn lord"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/P)/Ch                "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.                    to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"his nobles lordes and comyn peple of his noble royame of Englond"                (t/C2 + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/P)/Ch                "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

vertuous                 (N/C2 + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/P)/Ch                "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
"prouffitable and honeste maners"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "as our manner is"/P)/+bp                "as our manner is"

24.                 in <the> gymnasium

"In whiche your noble persone wyth guydyng of your hows haboundeth"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in gymnasium"/P)/Ch                "in gymnasium"

25.
"gyuyng light and ensample unto all other"                (Z/C2 + "-euxippus began to us"/P)/Ch                "Zeuxippus began to us"

26. Therfore I haue put me in deuour to translate <a> lityll book late comen in to myn handes out of frensh in to englisshe

"Therfore I haue put me in deuour to translate lityll book late comen in to myn handes out of frensh in to englisshe"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "In my opinion"/P)/Ch                "In my opinion"

27.
"In which I fynde thauctorites"                  (s/C2 + "-aid he"/P)/Ch                  "said he"

28.        <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

dictees                 (d/C2 + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/P)/Ch                "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    William Caxton's  "Prefaces and Prologues (to Famous Books)"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a342 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3052 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3052/3052-h/3052-h.htm ,  
Essays and Miscellanies by Plutarch

PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS
THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO LIVE PLEASURABLY ACCORDING TO THE DOCTRINE OF EPICURUS.
PLUTARCH, ZEUXIPPUS, THEON, ARISTODEMUS.
Epicurus's great confidant and familiar, Colotes, set forth a book with this title to it, that according to the tenets of the other philosophers it is impossible to live. Now what occurred to me then to say against him, in the defence of those philosophers, hath been already put into writing by me. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in the walks in further opposition to his party, I thought it not amiss to recollect them also, if for no other reason, yet for this one, that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over the discourses and writings of those they would disprove, nor by tearing out one word here and another there, or by falling foul upon particular passages without the books, to impose upon the ignorant and unlearned.

Now as we were leaving the school to take a walk (as our manner is) in the gymnasium, Zeuxippus began to us: In my opinion, said he, the debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting. I am sure, Heraclides went away disgusted with us, ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/13182/pg13182.html ,    

Title:       Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations
[Illustration]
Author: Charles W. Eliot
"DR. ELIOT'S FIVE-FOOT SHELF OF BOOKS"

CONTENTS
TITLE, PROLOGUE AND EPILOGUES TO THE RECUYELL OF THE HISTORIES OF TROY WILLIAM CAXTON
EPILOGUE TO DICTES AND SAYINGS OF THE PHILOSOPHERS WILLIAM CAXTON
PROLOGUE TO GOLDEN LEGEND WILLIAM CAXTON PROLOGUE TO CATON WILLIAM CAXTON EPILOGUE TO AESOP WILLIAM CAXTON PROEM TO CHAUCER'S CANTERBURY TALES WILLIAM CAXTON PROLOGUE TO MALORY'S KING ARTHUR WILLIAM CAXTON PROLOGUE TO VIRGIL'S ENEYDOS WILLIAM CAXTON
dedication of the institutes of the christian religion john calvin translated by john allen
dedication of the revolutions of the heavenly bodies nicolaus copernicus
PREFACE TO THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND JOHN KNOX
PREFATORY LETTER TO SIR WALTER RALEIGH ON THE FAERIE QUEENE EDMUND SPENSER
PREFACE TO THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD SIR WALTER RALEIGH
PROOEMIUM, EPISTLE DEDICATORY, PREFACE, AND PLAN OF THE INSTAURATIO MAGNA, ETC. FRANCIS BACON TRANSLATION EDITED BY J. SPEDDING
PREFACE TO THE NOVUM ORGANUM FRANCIS BACON
PREFACE TO THE FIRST FOLIO EDITION OF SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS HEMINGE AND CONDELL
PREFACE TO THE PHILOSOPHIAE NATURALIS PRINCIPIA MATHEMATICA SIR ISAAC NEWTON TRANSLATED BY ANDREW MOTTE
PREFACE TO FABLES, ANCIENT AND MODERN JOHN DRYDEN
PREFACE TO JOSEPH ANDREWS HENRY FIELDING PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH DICTIONARY SAMUEL JOHNSON PREFACE TO SHAKESPEARE SAMUEL JOHNSON INTRODUCTION TO THE PROPYLÄEN J.W. VON GOETHE
PREFACES TO VARIOUS VOLUMES OF POEMS WILLIAM WORDSWORTH APPENDIX TO LYRICAL BALLADS WILLIAM WORDSWORTH ESSAY SUPPLEMENTARY TO PREFACE WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
PREFACE TO CROMWELL VICTOR HUGO PREFACE TO LEAVES OF GRASS WALT WHITMAN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE H.A. TAINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE ~ ~


"Prefaces and Prologues"                    (W/P + "-illiam Caxton's work"/C2)                   "William Caxton's work"
"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books"                    (W/P + "-illiam Caxton's work"/C2)/Ch                   "William Caxton's work"

"Prefaces and Prologues"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)                   "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"Notes and Illustrations"                 (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/C2)                 "philosophical essays"

Illustration                 (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/C2)/Ch                 "philosophical essays"

2.           that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

Author                 (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/C2)                 "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

DR                 (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/C2)/Ch                 "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.
"Charles W"                              (Pl/P + utarch/C2)                                Plutarch

"ELIOT'S FIVE"                          (Pl/P + utarch/C2)/Ch                             Plutarch

4.
Eliot                                    (Z/P + euxippus/C2)                              Zeuxippus

"FOOT SHELF OF BOOKS"                    (Z/P + euxippus/C2)/Ch                    Zeuxippus

5.
CONTENTS                                     (Th/P + eon/C2)                              Theon

6.
TITLE                            ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/C2)                      Aristodemus

7.             prologue and epilogues to <the> recuyell of <the> histories of Troy William Caxton

"prologue and epilogues to recuyell of histories of Troy William Caxton"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/C2)                 "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.             epilogue to dictes and sayings of <the> philosophers William Caxton

"epilogue to dictes and sayings of philosophers William Caxton"                 (C/P + olotes/C2)                 Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

"prologue to golden legend William Caxton prologue to Caton William Caxton epilogue to Aesop William Caxton proem to Chaucer's Canterbury tales William Caxton prologue to Malory's king Arthur William Caxton prologue to Virgil's eneydos William Caxton"                 (s/P + "-et forth book with this title to it"/C2)                 "set forth book with this title to it"

10. that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live --- dedication of <the> institutes of <the> christian religion John Calvin translated by John Allen

"dedication of institutes of christian religion John Calvin translated by John Allen"                 (th/P + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/C2)                 "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.            dedication of <the> revolutions of <the> heavenly bodies Nicolaus Copernicus

"dedication of revolutions of heavenly bodies Nicolaus Copernicus"                 (N/P + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/C2)                 "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12. in <the> defence of those philosophers --- preface to <the> history of <the> reformation in Scotland John Knox

"preface to history of reformation in Scotland John Knox"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in defence of those philosophers"/C2)                 "in defence of those philosophers"

13.            prefatory letter to Sir Walter Raleigh on <the> Faerie Queene Edmund Spenser

"prefatory letter to Sir Walter Raleigh on Faerie Queene Edmund Spenser"                 (h/P + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/C2)                 "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party --- preface to <the> history of <the> world Sir Walter Raleigh

"preface to history of world Sir Walter Raleigh"                 (B/P + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/C2)                 "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.
Prooemium                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/C2)                 "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
"epistle dedicatory"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "if for no other reason"/C2)                 "if for no other reason"

17.
preface                       (y/P + "-et for this one"/C2)                        "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove --- and plan of <the> instauratio magna

"and plan of instauratio magna"                 (th/P + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/C2)                 "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.
"ETC"                 (n/P + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/C2)                 "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.              or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

"Francis Bacon translation edited by J"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/C2)                 "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.                    to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

Spedding                 (t/P + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/C2)                 "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

vertuous                 (N/P + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/C2)                 "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.              preface to <the> novum organum Francis Bacon

"preface to novum organum Francis Bacon"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as our manner is"/C2)                 "as our manner is"

24. in <the> gymnasium --- preface to <the> first folio edition of Shakespeare's plays Heminge and Condell

"preface to first folio edition of Shakespeare's plays Heminge and Condell"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in gymnasium"/C2)                 "in gymnasium"

25. preface to <the> philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica Sir Isaac Newton translated by Andrew Motte

"preface to philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica Sir Isaac Newton translated by Andrew Motte"                 (Z/P + "-euxippus began to us"/C2)                 "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
"preface to fables"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "In my opinion"/C2)                 "In my opinion"

"Therfore I haue put me in deuour to translate lityll book late comen in to myn handes out of frensh in to englisshe"                (/C2 + ""/P)/Ch                ""

27.
"ancient and modern John Dryden"                 (s/P + "-aid he"/C2)                 "said he"

28. <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting --- preface to Joseph Andrews Henry fielding preface to <the> English dictionary Samuel Johnson preface to Shakespeare Samuel Johnson introduction to <the> Propyläen J

"preface to Joseph Andrews Henry fielding preface to English dictionary Samuel Johnson preface to Shakespeare Samuel Johnson introduction to Propyläen J"                 (d/P + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/C2)                 "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

29.
W                             ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I am sure"/C2)                           "I am sure"

30.
"Von Goethe"                 (H/P + "-eraclides went away disgusted with us"/C2)                "Heraclides went away disgusted with us"

Et cetera.



Henry B. Wheatley
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Henry+B.+Wheatley ,  

"Henry B. Wheatley"                    (S/C2 + "-amuel Pepys"/T)/+bp/Ch                   "Samuel Pepys"

*           "Henry B. Wheatley"  >>  "Henry B. Wheatley, F.S.A." /GC/S/abT


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/w#a205 ,    
•  The History of Sir Richard Whittington (English) (as Editor)
•  How to Form a Library, 2nd ed (English) (as Author)
•  Literary Blunders (English) (as Author)
•  Of the Orthographie and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue
A Treates, noe shorter than necessarie, for the Schooles (English) (as Editor)

"History of Sir Richard Whittington"                (H/P + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)            "Henry B. Wheatley's work"
"How to Form Library"                (H/S + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)             "Henry B. Wheatley's work"
"Literary Blunders"                 (H/GC/S/abT + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)             "Henry B. Wheatley's work"

"Of Orthographie and Congruitie of Britan Tongue"               (H/T + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)               "Henry B. Wheatley's work"
"Treates, noe shorter than necessarie, for Schooles"              (H/T + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)/Ch             "Henry B. Wheatley's work"

"History of Sir Richard Whittington"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)                 Iliad
"How to Form Library"                           ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)                       Iliad
"Literary Blunders"                        ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)                     Iliad

"Of Orthographie and Congruitie of Britan Tongue"               ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)               Iliad



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Henry B. Wheatley's  "The History of Sir Richard Whittington"      and   Homer's Iliad


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17652/17652-h/17652-h.htm ,    

The History of Sir Richard Whittington
BY T. H.
EDITED, WITH AN INTRODUCTION,
BY
HENRY B. WHEATLEY, F.S.A.

Introduction.

The popular story of Whittington and his Cat is one in which a version of a wide-spread folk-tale has been grafted upon the history of the life of an historical character, and in the later versions the historical incidents have been more and more eliminated. The three chief points in the chap-book story are, 1, the poor parentage of the hero; 2, his change of mind at Highgate Hill by reason of hearing Bow Bells; and, 3, his good fortune arising from the sale of his cat. Now these are all equally untrue as referring to the historical Whittington, and the second is apparently an invention of the eighteenth century. When the Rev. Canon Lysons wrote his interesting and valuable work entitled The Model Merchant he showed the incorrectness of the first point by tracing out Whittington's distinguished pedigree, but he was loath to dispute the other two. ~ ~

"History of Sir Richard Whittington"                (H/P + "-enry B. Wheatley's work"/C2)            "Henry B. Wheatley's work"

"History of Sir Richard Whittington"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)                 Iliad


1.
"BY T"                               (B/P + "-ook I/One"/C2)                          "Book I/One"

2.
H                           ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Achilles sing"/C2)                        "Achilles sing"

3.
EDITED                      ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "O Goddess"/C2)                          "O Goddess"

4.               WITH <AN> INTRODUCTION

"WITH INTRODUCTION"                   (P/P + "-eleus' son"/C2)                     "Peleus' son"

5.
"BY HENRY B"                (H/P + "-is wrath pernicious"/C2)                 "His wrath pernicious"

6.
WHEATLEY                 (wh/P + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/C2)                 "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

7.                sent many <a> soul Illustrious into Ades premature

F                (s/P + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/C2)                 "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

8.
S                     ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "And Heroes gave"/C2)                     "And Heroes gave"

9.                  so stood <the> will of Jove

A                (s/P + "-o stood will of Jove"/C2)                 "so stood will of Jove"

10.               To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey

Introduction                (T/P + "-o dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/C2)                 "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

11. When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus --- <The> popular story of Whittington and his Cat is one in which <a> version of <a> wide

"popular story of Whittington and his Cat is one in which version of wide"                (Wh/P + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/C2)                 "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

12.
"spread folk"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Agamemnon/C2)                 Agamemnon

13.     tale has been grafted upon <the> history of <the> life of <an> historical character

"tale has been grafted upon history of life of historical character"                (K/P + "-ing of men"/C2)                 "King of men"

14.      and in <the> later versions <the> historical incidents have been more and more eliminated

"and in later versions historical incidents have been more and more eliminated"                (Wh/P + "-o them to strife impell'd"/C2)                 "Who them to strife impell'd"

15.              <The> three chief points in <the> chap

"three chief points in chap"                (Wh/P + "-at power divine"/C2)                 "What power divine"

16.
"book story are"                (L/P + "-atona's son and Jove's"/C2)                 "Latona's son and Jove's"

"1/one"                (L/P + "-atona's son and Jove's"/C2)/Ch                 "Latona's son and Jove's"

17.                  <the> poor parentage of <the> hero

"poor parentage of hero"                          (F/P + "-or he"/C2)                      "For he"

"2/two"                                   (F/P + "-or he"/C2)/Ch                           "For he"

18.                      incensed Against the King

"his change of mind at Highgate Hill by reason of hearing Bow Bells"                ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "incensed Against King"/C2)                 "incensed Against King"

19.               <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host

and                (f/P + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/C2)                 "foul contagion raised In all host"

"3/three"                (f/P + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/C2) Ch                 "foul contagion raised In all host"

20.               his good fortune arising from <the> sale of his cat

"his good fortune arising from sale of his cat"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and multitudes destroy'd"/C2)                 "and multitudes destroy'd"

21. For that the son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored --- Now these are all equally untrue as referring to <the> historical Whittington

"Now these are all equally untrue as referring to historical Whittington"                (F/P + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/C2)                 "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

22.               and <the> second is apparently <an> invention of <the> eighteenth century

"and second is apparently invention of eighteenth century"                (Chrys/P + es/C2)                 Chryses

23.    To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter --- When <the> Rev

"When Rev"                (T/P + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/C2)                 "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"

24. and his hands charged with the wreath And golden sceptre of the God shaft --- Canon Lysons wrote his interesting and valuable work entitled <The> Model Merchant he showed <the> incorrectness of <the> first point by tracing out Whittington's distinguished pedigree

"Canon Lysons wrote his interesting and valuable work entitled Model Merchant he showed incorrectness of first point by tracing out Whittington's distinguished pedigree"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft"/C2)                 "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft"

25.               but he was loath to dispute <the> other two

"but he was loath to dispute other two"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + arm'd/C2)                  arm'd

Et cetera.



Algernon Charles Swinburne
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Algernon+Charles+Swinburne ,    

Swinburne                        (R/T + "-obert Herrick"/C2)                      "Robert Herrick"

*              Swinburne  >>  "Algernon Charles Swinburne" /S

Born                             5 April 1837                            London, England
Died                         10 April 1909 (aged 72)                     London, England

"1837"                            (Sw/P + inburne/S)/+bp                               Swinburne
April                               (Sw/P + inburne/S)/+cp                               Swinburne
"5th"                            (Sw/P + inburne/S)/Ch/+bp                             Swinburne
"London, England"                     (Sw/P + inburne/S)/Ch/+cp                       Swinburne

"1909"                           (Sw/P + inburne/C2)/+bp                               Swinburne
April                             (Sw/P + inburne/C2)/+cp                               Swinburne
"10th"                         (Sw/P + inburne/C2)/Ch/+bp                             Swinburne
"London, England"                     (Sw/P + inburne/C2)/Ch/+cp                     Swinburne


>>            Century of Roundels dedicated to Christina Rossetti.

"Christina Rossetti"                    (Sw/T + inburne/C2)                   Swinburne


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a832 ,  
#    The Age of Shakespeare (English) (as Author)
#    Astrophel and Other Poems
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol. VI (English) (as Author)
#    Atalanta in Calydon (English) (as Author)
#    A Century of Roundels (English) (as Author)

"Age of Shakespeare"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Astrophel and Other Poems"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol. VI"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Atalanta in Calydon"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Century of Roundels"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Age of Shakespeare"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/+bp                      Iliad
"Astrophel and Other Poems"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/+cp                      Iliad
"Atalanta in Calydon"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp                      Iliad
"Century of Roundels"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Iliad

#    A Channel Passage and Other Poems
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol VI (English) (as Author)
#    Chastelard, a tragedy (English) (as Author)
#    A Dark Month
From Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works Vol. V (English) (as Author)
#    The Duke of Gandia (English) (as Author)

"Channel Passage and Other Poems"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol VI"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Chastelard, tragedy"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Dark Month"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"From Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works Vol. V"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C1)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Duke of Gandia"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Channel Passage and Other Poems"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/+bp                  Iliad
"Chastelard, tragedy"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/+cp                       Iliad
"Dark Month"                         ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp                         Iliad
"Duke of Gandia"                      ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                        Iliad

#    Erechtheus
A Tragedy (New Edition) (English) (as Author)
#    The Heptalogia (English) (as Author)
#    The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 (English) (as Commentator)
#    Locrine: a tragedy (English) (as Author)

Erechtheus                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp                "Swinburne's work"
"Tragedy New Edition"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+bp                "Swinburne's work"

Heptalogia                   (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp                "Swinburne's work"
"Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp                "Swinburne's work"
"Locrine: tragedy"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp                "Swinburne's work"

Erechtheus                             ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/+bp                           Iliad
Heptalogia                              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/+cp                           Iliad
"Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2"              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp              Iliad
"Locrine: tragedy"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                         Iliad

#    A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems (English) (as Author)
#    Poems and Ballads (Third Series)
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III (English) (as Author)
#    Poems & Ballads (First Series) (English) (as Author)
#    Poems & Ballads (Second Series)
Swinburne's Poems Volume III (English) (as Author)

"Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems and Ballads Third Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems & Ballads First Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems & Ballads Second Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Swinburne's Poems Volume III"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C1)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/+bp              Iliad
"Poems and Ballads Third Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/+cp              Iliad
"Poems & Ballads First Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp              Iliad
"Poems & Ballads Second Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp              Iliad

#    Rosamund, queen of the Lombards, a tragedy (English) (as Author)
#    Songs Before Sunrise (English) (as Author)
#    Songs of the Springtides and Birthday Ode
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III (English) (as Author)
#    Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets (1590-1650)
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol V. (English) (as Author)

"Rosamund, queen of Lombards, tragedy"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Songs Before Sunrise"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Songs of Springtides and Birthday Ode"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol V"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Rosamund, queen of Lombards, tragedy"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/+bp              Iliad
"Songs Before Sunrise"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Iliad
"Songs of Springtides and Birthday Ode"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp              Iliad
"Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp              Iliad

#    Studies in Song (English) (as Author)
#    Studies in Song, A Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, The Heptalogia, Etc.
From Swinburne's Poems Volume V. (English) (as Author)
#    A Study of Shakespeare (English) (as Author)
#    The Tale of Balen (English) (as Author)

"Studies in Song"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Studies in Song, Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, Heptalogia, Etc."                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"From Swinburne's Poems Volume V"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Study of Shakespeare"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Tale of Balen"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Studies in Song"                        ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/+bp                         Iliad
"Studies in Song, Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, Heptalogia, Etc."              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/+cp                Iliad
"Study of Shakespeare"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/Ch/+bp                   Iliad
"Tale of Balen"                         ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/Ch/+cp                        Iliad

#    Two Nations (English) (as Author)
#    William Blake
A Critical Essay (English) (as Author)

"Two Nations"                  (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)                   "Swinburne's work"

"William Blake"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Critical Essay"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Two Nations"                          ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad /P)                                Iliad
"William Blake"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/P)/Ch/+bp                            Iliad



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Age of Shakespeare"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14252/14252-h/14252-h.htm ,  
THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE

TO THE MEMORY OF CHARLES LAMB
When stark oblivion froze above their names Whose glory shone round Shakespeare's, bright as now, One eye beheld their light shine full as fame's, One hand unveiled it: this did none but thou. Love, stronger than forgetfulness and sleep, Rose, and bade memory rise, and England hear: And all the harvest left so long to reap Shone ripe and rich in every sheaf and ear.
A child it was who first by grace of thine Communed with gods who share with thee their shrine: Elder than thou wast ever now I am, Now that I lay before thee in thanksgiving Praise of dead men divine and everliving Whose praise is thine as thine is theirs, Charles Lamb.

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

The first great English poet was the father of English tragedy and the creator of English blank verse. Chaucer and Spenser were great writers and great men: they shared between them every gift which goes to the making of a poet except the one which alone can make a poet, in the proper sense of the word, great. Neither pathos nor humor nor fancy nor invention will suffice for that: no poet is great as a poet whom no one could ever pretend to recognize as sublime. Sublimity is the test of imagination as distinguished from invention or from fancy: and the first English poet whose powers can be called sublime was Christopher Marlowe.

The majestic and exquisite excellence of various lines and passages in Marlowe's first play must be admitted to relieve, if it cannot be allowed to redeem, the stormy monotony of Titanic truculence which blusters like a simoom through the noisy course of its ten fierce acts. With many and heavy faults, there is something of genuine greatness in "Tamburlaine the Great"; and for two grave reasons it must always be remembered with distinction and mentioned with honor. It is the first poem ever written in English blank verse, as distinguished from mere rhymeless decasyllabics; and it contains one of the noblest passages—perhaps, indeed, the noblest in the literature of the world—ever written by one of the greatest masters of poetry in loving praise of the glorious delights and sublime submission to the everlasting limits of his art. In its highest and most distinctive qualities, in unfaltering and infallible command of the right note of music and the proper tone of color for the finest touches of poetic execution, no poet of the most elaborate modern school, working at ease upon every consummate resource of luxurious learning and leisurely refinement, has ever excelled the best and most representative work of a man who had literally no models before him,

and probably or evidently was often, if not always, compelled to write against time for his living. ~ ~


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK I.

Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus' son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia's host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)5
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.. ~ ~


"Age of Shakespeare"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Age of Shakespeare"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/+bp                      Iliad

1.              TO <THE> MEMORY OF CHARLES LAMB

"to memory of Charles Lamb"                      (B/P + ook/C2)/+bp                        Book

2.
"When stark oblivion froze above their names Whose glory shone round Shakespeare's"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + One/C2)/+bp                 "I/One"

3.
"bright as now"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Achilles/C2)/+bp                       Achilles

4.
"One eye beheld their light shine full as fame's"                 (s/P + ing/C2)/+bp                 sing

5.
"One hand unveiled it"                        ([ŋ=  w=]/P + O/C2)/+bp                         O

Et cetera     as below.


BOOK - (TO <THE> MEMORY OF CHARLES LAMB) -- I - (When stark oblivion froze above their names Whose glory shone round Shakespeare's) --.

Achilles - (bright as now) -- sing - (One eye beheld their light shine full as fame's) --, O - (One hand unveiled it) -- Goddess! - (this did none but thou) -- Peleus' - (Love) -- son - (stronger than forgetfulness and sleep) --;
His wrath - (Rose) -- pernicious - (and bade memory rise) --, who ten - (and England hear) -- thousand - (And all <the> harvest left so long to reap Shone ripe and rich in every sheaf and ear) -- woes - (<A> child it was who first by grace of thine Communed with gods who share with thee their shrine) --
Caused - (Elder than thou wast ever now I am) -- to Achaia's - (Now that I lay before thee in thanksgiving Praise of dead men divine and everliving Whose praise is thine as thine is theirs) -- host - (Charles Lamb) --, sent - (CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE) -- many - (<The> first great English poet was <the> father of English tragedy and <the> creator of English blank verse) -- <a> soul - (Chaucer and Spenser were great writers and great men) --
Illustrious - (they shared between them every gift which goes to <the> making of <a> poet except <the> one which alone can make <a> poet) -- into - (in <the> proper sense of <the> word) -- Ades - (great) -- premature - (Neither pathos nor humor nor fancy nor invention will suffice for that) --,
And Heroes - (no poet is great as <a> poet whom no one could ever pretend to recognize as sublime) -- gave - (Sublimity is <the> test of imagination as distinguished from invention or from fancy) -- (so stood - (and <the> first English poet whose powers can be called sublime was Christopher Marlowe) -- <the> will - (<The> majestic and exquisite excellence of various lines and passages in Marlowe's first play must be admitted to relieve) -- of Jove - (if it cannot be allowed to redeem) --)5
To dogs - (<the> stormy monotony of Titanic truculence which blusters like <a> simoom through <the> noisy course of its ten fierce acts) -- and to all - (With many and heavy faults) -- ravening - (there is something of genuine greatness in) -- fowls - (Tamburlaine <the> Great) -- <a> prey - (and for two grave reasons it must always be remembered with distinction and mentioned with honor) --,
When fierce - (It is <the> first poem ever written in English blank verse) -- dispute - (as distinguished from mere rhymeless decasyllabics) -- had separated - (and it contains one of <the> noblest passages) -- once - (perhaps) --
<The> noble - (indeed) -- Chief - (<the> noblest in <the> literature of <the> world) -- Achilles from <the> son - (ever written by one of <the> greatest masters of poetry in loving praise of <the> glorious delights and sublime submission to <the> everlasting limits of his art) --
Of Atreus - (In its highest and most distinctive qualities) --, Agamemnon - (in unfaltering and infallible command of <the> right note of music and <the> proper tone of color for <the> finest touches of poetic execution) --, King - (no poet of <the> most elaborate modern school) -- of men - (working at ease upon every consummate resource of luxurious learning and leisurely refinement,) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Astrophel and Other Poems"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18673/18673-h/18673-h.htm ,    
Astrophel and Other Poems

A MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY: ASTROPHEL: A CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER TALES


ASTROPHEL
AFTER READING SIR PHILIP SIDNEY'S ARCADIA IN THE GARDEN OF AN OLD ENGLISH MANOR HOUSE
I
A star in the silence that follows The song of the death of the sun Speaks music in heaven, and the hollows And heights of the world are as one; One lyre that outsings and outlightens The rapture of sunset, and thrills Mute night till the sense of it brightens The soul that it fills.
The flowers of the sun that is sunken Hang heavy of heart as of head; The bees that have eaten and drunken The soul of their sweetness are fled; But a sunflower of song, on whose honey My spirit has fed as a bee, Makes sunnier than morning was sunny The twilight for me.

The letters and lines on the pages That sundered mine eyes and the flowers Wax faint as the shadows of ages That sunder their season and ours; As the ghosts of the centuries that sever A season of colourless time From the days whose remembrance is ever, As they were, sublime.
The season that bred and that cherished The soul that I commune with yet, Had it utterly withered and perished To rise not again as it set, Shame were it that Englishmen living Should read as their forefathers read The books of the praise and thanksgiving Of Englishmen dead.

O light of the land that adored thee And kindled thy soul with her breath, Whose life, such as fate would afford thee, Was lovelier than aught but thy death, By what name, could thy lovers but know it, Might love of thee hail thee afar, Philisides, Astrophel, poet Whose love was thy star?
A star in the moondawn of Maytime, A star in the cloudland of change; Too splendid and sad for the daytime To cheer or eclipse or estrange; Too sweet for tradition or vision To see but through shadows of tears Rise deathless across the division Of measureless years.
The twilight may deepen and harden As nightward the stream of it runs Till starshine transfigure a garden Whose radiance responds to the sun's: The light of the love of thee darkens The lights that arise and that set: The love that forgets thee not hearkens If England forget.
II
Bright and brief in the sight of grief and love the light of thy lifetime shone,
Seen and felt by the gifts it dealt, ~ ~


"Astrophel and Other Poems"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol. VI"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Astrophel and Other Poems"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/+cp                      Iliad


1.               <A> MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY

"MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY"                        (B/P + ook/C2)/+cp                           Book

2.
ASTROPHEL                        ([ŋ=  w=]/P + One/C2)/+cp                            "I/One"

3.                <A> CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER TALES

"CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER TALES"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Achilles/C2)/+cp                 Achilles

4.
ASTROPHEL                              (s/P + ing/C2)/+cp                                  sing

5.      after reading sir Philip Sidney's arcadia in <the> garden of <an> old English manor house

"after reading sir Philip Sidney's arcadia in garden of old English manor house"                        ([ŋ=  w=]/P + O/C2)/+cp                         O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY) -- I/One - (ASTROPHEL) --.

Achilles - (CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER TALES) -- sing - (ASTROPHEL) --, O - (after reading sir Philip Sidney's arcadia in <the> garden of <an> old English manor house) -- Goddess! - (I/one) -- Peleus' - (<A> star in <the> silence that follows <The> song of <the> death of <the> sun Speaks music in heaven) -- son - (and <the> hollows And heights of <the> world are as one) --;
His wrath - (One lyre that outsings and outlightens <The> rapture of sunset) -- pernicious - (and thrills Mute night till <the> sense of it brightens <The> soul that it fills) --, who ten - (<The> flowers of <the> sun that is sunken Hang heavy of heart as of head) -- thousand - (<The> bees that have eaten and drunken <The> soul of their sweetness are fled) -- woes - (But <a> sunflower of song) --
Caused - (on whose honey My spirit has fed as <a> bee) -- to Achaia's - (Makes sunnier than morning was sunny <The> twilight for me) -- host - (<The> letters and lines on <the> pages That sundered mine eyes and <the> flowers Wax faint as <the> shadows of ages That sunder their season and ours) --, sent - (As <the> ghosts of the centuries that sever <A> season of colourless time From <the> days whose remembrance is ever) -- many <a> soul - (As they were) --
Illustrious - (sublime) -- into Ades - (<The> season that bred and that cherished <The> soul that I commune with yet) -- premature - (Had it utterly withered and perished To rise not again as it set) --,
And Heroes - (Shame were it that Englishmen living Should read as their forefathers read <The> books of <the> praise and thanksgiving Of Englishmen dead) -- gave - (O light of <the> land that adored thee And kindled thy soul with her breath) -- (so stood - (Whose life) -- <the> will - (such as fate would afford thee) -- of Jove - (Was lovelier than aught but thy death) --)5
To dogs - (By what name) -- and to all - (could thy lovers but know it) -- ravening - (Might love of thee hail thee afar) -- fowls - (Philisides) -- <a> prey - (Astrophel) --,
When fierce - (poet Whose love was thy star) -- dispute - (<A> star in <the> moondawn of Maytime) -- had separated - (<A> star in <the> cloudland of change) -- once - (Too splendid and sad for <the> daytime To cheer or eclipse or estrange) --
<The> noble - (Too sweet for tradition or vision To see but through shadows of tears Rise deathless across <the> division Of measureless years) -- Chief - (<The> twilight may deepen and harden As nightward <the> stream of it runs Till starshine transfigure <a> garden Whose radiance responds to <the> sun's) -- Achilles from <the> son - (<The> light of <the> love of thee darkens <The> lights that arise and that set) --
Of Atreus - (<The> love that forgets thee not hearkens If England forget) --, Agamemnon - (II/Two) --, King - (Bright and brief in <the> sight of grief and love <the> light of thy lifetime shone) -- of men - (Seen and felt by <the> gifts it dealt) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Atalanta in Calydon"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/15378/pg15378.html ,  

Atalanta in Calydon
A Tragedy

TO THE MEMORY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR
I NOW DEDICATE, WITH EQUAL AFFECTION, REVERENCE, AND REGRET, A POEM INSCRIBED TO HIM WHILE YET ALIVE IN WORDS WHICH ARE NOW RETAINED BECAUSE THEY WERE LAID BEFORE HIM; AND TO WHICH, RATHER THAN CANCEL THEM, I HAVE ADDED SUCH OTHERS AS WERE EVOKED BY THE NEWS OF HIS DEATH: THAT THOUGH LOSING THE PLEASURE I MAY NOT LOSE THE HONOUR OF INSCRIBING IN FRONT OF MY WORK THE HIGHEST OF CONTEMPORARY NAMES.

oixeo de Boreethen apotropos' alla se Numphai
    egagon aspasian edupnooi kath' ala,
  plerousai melitos theothen stoma, me ti Poseidon
    blapsei, en osin exon sen meligerun opa.
  toios aoidos ephus: emeis d' eti klaiomen, oi sou
    deuometh' oixomenou, kai se pothoumen aei.
  eipe de Pieridon tis anastrephtheisa pros allen:
    elthen, idou, panton philtatos elthe broton,
  stemmata drepsamenos neothelea xersi geraiais,
    kai polion daphnais amphekalupse kara, 10
  edu ti Sikelikais epi pektisin, edu ti xordais,
    aisomenos: pollen gar meteballe luran,
  pollaki d' en bessaisi kathemenon euren Apollon,
    anthesi d' estepsen, terpna d' edoke legein,
  Pana t' aeimneston te Pitun Koruthon te dusedron,
    en t' ephilese thean thnetos Amadruada:
  pontou d' en megaroisin ekoimise Kumodameian,
    ten t' Agamemnonian paid' apedoke patri,
  pros d' ierous Delphous theoplekton epempsen Oresten,
    teiromenon stugerais entha kai entha theais. 20 ~ ~


"Atalanta in Calydon"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Atalanta in Calydon"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp                      Iliad


1.              <A> Tragedy

Tragedy                              (B/P + ook/C2)/Ch/+bp                                 Book

2.             TO <THE> MEMORY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR

"to memory of Walter Savage Landor"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + One/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "I/One"

3.
"I now dedicate"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+bp                   Achilles

4.
"with equal affection"                         (s/P + ing/C2)/Ch/+bp                           sing

5.
reverence                                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + O/C2)/+bp                              O

Et cetera     as below.


BOOK - (<A> Tragedy) -- I/One - (to <the> memory of Walter Savage Landor) --.

Achilles - (I now dedicate) -- sing - (with equal affection) --, O - (reverence) -- Goddess! - (and regret) -- Peleus' - (<a> poem inscribed to him while yet alive in words which are now retained because they were laid before him) -- son - (and to which) --;
His wrath - (rather than cancel them) -- pernicious - (I have added such others as were evoked by <the> news of his death) --, who ten - (that though losing <the> pleasure i may not lose <the> honour of inscribing in front of my work <the> highest of contemporary names) -- thousand - (oixeo de Boreethen apotropos' alla se Numphai egagon aspasian edupnooi kath' ala) -- woes - (plerousai melitos theothen stoma) --
Caused - (me ti Poseidon blapsei) -- to Achaia's - (en osin exon sen meligerun opa) -- host - (toios aoidos ephus) --, sent - (emeis d' eti klaiomen) -- many - (oi sou deuometh' oixomenou) -- <a> soul - (kai se pothoumen aei) --
Illustrious - (eipe de Pieridon tis anastrephtheisa pros allen) -- into - (elthen) -- Ades - (idou) -- premature - (panton philtatos elthe broton) --,
And Heroes - (stemmata drepsamenos neothelea xersi geraiais) -- gave - (kai polion daphnais amphekalupse kara) -- (so stood - (edu ti Sikelikais epi pektisin) -- <the> will - (edu ti xordais) -- of Jove - (aisomenos) --)5
To dogs - (pollen gar meteballe luran) -- and to all - (pollaki d' en bessaisi kathemenon euren Apollon) -- ravening - (anthesi d' estepsen) -- fowls - (terpna d' edoke legein) -- <a> prey - (Pana t' aeimneston te Pitun Koruthon te dusedron) --,
When fierce - (en t' ephilese thean thnetos Amadruada) -- dispute - (pontou d' en megaroisin ekoimise Kumodameian) -- had separated - (ten t' Agamemnonian paid' apedoke patri) -- once - (pros d' ierous Delphous theoplekton epempsen Oresten) --

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Century of Roundels"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3697/pg3697.html ,  
A Century of Roundels

DEDICATION TO CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI

Songs light as these may sound, though deep and strong
The heart spake through them, scarce should hope to please
Ears tuned to strains of loftier thoughts than throng
   Songs light as these.

Yet grace may set their sometime doubt at ease,
Nor need their too rash reverence fear to wrong
The shrine it serves at and the hope it sees.

For childlike loves and laughters thence prolong
Notes that bid enter, fearless as the breeze,
Even to the shrine of holiest-hearted song,
   Songs light as these.
IN HARBOUR
I.

Goodnight and goodbye to the life whose signs denote us
As mourners clothed with regret for the life gone by;
To the waters of gloom whence winds of the dayspring float us
   Goodnight and goodbye.

A time is for mourning, a season for grief to sigh;
But were we not fools and blind, by day to devote us
As thralls to the darkness, unseen of the sundawn's eye?

We have drunken of Lethe at length, we have eaten of lotus;
What hurts it us here that sorrows are born and die?
We have said to the dream that caressed and the dread that smote us
   Goodnight and goodbye.
II.

Outside of the port ye are moored in, lying
Close from the wind and at ease from the tide,
What sounds come swelling, what notes fall dying
   Outside?

They will not cease, they will not abide:
Voices of presage in darkness crying
Pass and return and relapse aside.

Ye see not, but hear ye not wild wings flying
To the future that wakes from the past that died?
Is grief still sleeping, is joy not sighing
   Outside?

THE WAY OF THE WIND

The wind's way in the deep sky's hollow
None may measure, as none can say
How the heart in her shows the swallow
   The wind's way.

Hope nor fear can avail to stay
Waves that whiten on wrecks that wallow,
Times and seasons that wane and slay.

Life and love, till the strong night swallow
Thought and hope and the red last ray,
Swim the waters of years that follow
   The wind's way.

'HAD I WIST'

Had I wist, when life was like a warm wind playing
Light and loud through sundawn and the dew's bright trust,
How the time should come for hearts to sigh in saying
   'Had I wist' - ~ ~


"Century of Roundels"                 (Sw/P + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Century of Roundels"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Iliad


1.
"dedication to Christina G"                      (B/P + ook/C2)/Ch/+cp                        Book

2.
"ROSSETTI Songs light as these may sound"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + One/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "I/One"

3.               though deep and strong <The> heart spake through them

"though deep and strong heart spake through them"               ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+cp               Achilles

4.
"scarce should hope to please Ears tuned to strains of loftier thoughts than throng Songs light as these"                (s/P + ing/C2)/Ch/+bp               sing

5.
"Yet grace may set their sometime doubt at ease"               ([ŋ=  w=]/P + O/C2)/+bp              O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (dedication to Christina G) -- I/One - (ROSSETTI Songs light as these may sound) --.

Achilles - (though deep and strong <The> heart spake through them) -- sing - (scarce should hope to please Ears tuned to strains of loftier thoughts than throng Songs light as these) --, O - (Yet grace may set their sometime doubt at ease) -- Goddess! - (Nor need their too rash reverence fear to wrong <The> shrine it serves at and <the> hope it sees) -- Peleus' - (For childlike loves and laughters thence prolong Notes that bid enter) -- son - (fearless as <the> breeze) --;
His wrath - (Even to <the> shrine of holiest-hearted song) -- pernicious - (Songs light as these) --, who ten - (IN HARBOUR I/one) -- thousand - (Goodnight and goodbye to <the> life whose signs denote us As mourners clothed with regret for <the> life gone by) -- woes - (To <the> waters of gloom whence winds of <the> dayspring float us Goodnight and goodbye) --
Caused - (<A> time is for mourning) -- to Achaia's - (<a> season for grief to sigh) -- host - (But were we not fools and blind) --, sent - (by day to devote us As thralls to <the> darkness) -- many <a> soul - (unseen of <the> sundawn's eye) --
Illustrious - (We have drunken of Lethe at length) -- into Ades - (we have eaten of lotus) -- premature - (What hurts it us here that sorrows are born and die) --,
And Heroes - (We have said to <the> dream that caressed and <the> dread that smote us Goodnight and goodbye) -- gave - (II/Two) -- (so stood - (Outside of <the> port ye are moored in) -- <the> will - (lying Close from <the> wind and at ease from <the> tide) -- of Jove - (What sounds come swelling) --)5
To dogs - (what notes fall dying Outside) -- and to all - (They will not cease) -- ravening - (they will not abide) -- fowls - (Voices of presage in darkness crying Pass and return and relapse aside) -- <a> prey - (Ye see not) --,
When fierce - (but hear ye not wild wings flying To <the> future that wakes from <the> past that died) -- dispute - (Is grief still sleeping) -- had separated - (is joy not sighing Outside) -- once - (<THE> WAY OF <THE> WIND <The> wind's way in <the> deep sky's hollow None may measure) --
<The> noble - (as none can say How <the> heart in her shows <the> swallow <The> wind's way) -- Chief - (Hope nor fear can avail to stay Waves that whiten on wrecks that wallow) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Times and seasons that wane and slay) --
Of Atreus - (Life and love) --, Agamemnon - (till <the> strong night swallow Thought and hope and <the> red last ray) --, King - (Swim <the> waters of years that follow <The> wind's way) -- of men - (HAD I WIST) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "A Channel Passage and Other Poems"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18871/18871-h/18871-h.htm ,  

A Channel Passage and Other Poems
TAKEN FROM THE COLLECTED POETICAL WORKS OF ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE—Vol VI

A MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY: ASTROPHEL: A Channel Passage and Other Poems

Forth from Calais, at dawn of night, when sunset summer on autumn shone, Fared the steamer alert and loud through seas whence only the sun was gone: Soft and sweet as the sky they smiled, and bade man welcome: a dim sweet hour Gleamed and whispered in wind and sea, and heaven was fair as a field in flower. Stars fulfilled the desire of the darkling world as with music: the starbright air Made the face of the sea, if aught may make the face of the sea, more fair.
Whence came change? Was the sweet night weary of rest? What anguish awoke in the dark? Sudden, sublime, the strong storm spake: we heard the thunders as hounds that bark. Lovelier if aught may be lovelier than stars, we saw the lightnings exalt the sky, Living and lustrous and rapturous as love that is born but to quicken and lighten and die. [Pg 280]Heaven's own heart at its highest of delight found utterance in music and semblance in fire: Thunder on thunder exulted, rejoicing to live and to satiate the night's desire.
And the night was alive and anhungered of life as a tiger from toils cast free: And a rapture of rage made joyous the spirit and strength of the soul of the sea. All the weight of the wind bore down on it, freighted with death for fraught: And the keen waves kindled and quickened as things transfigured or things distraught. And madness fell on them laughing and leaping; and madness came on the wind: And the might and the light and the darkness of storm were as storm in the heart of Ind. Such glory, such terror, such passion, as lighten and harrow the far fierce East, Rang, shone, ~ ~


"Channel Passage and Other Poems"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol VI"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Channel Passage and Other Poems"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/+bp                  Iliad


1.               <A> MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY

"MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY"                          (B/S + ook/C2)/+bp                         Book

2.
 ASTROPHEL                         ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/C2)/+bp                          "I/One"

3.            <A> Channel Passage and Other Poems

"Channel Passage and Other Poems"              ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/C2)/+bp               Achilles

4.
"in memory of William Morris and Edward Burne Jones"                 (s/S + ing/C2)/+bp                 sing

5.             <A> CHANNEL PASSAGE 1855

"CHANNEL PASSAGE 1855"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/C2)/+bp                   O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (<A> MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY) -- I/One - (ASTROPHEL) --.

Achilles - (<A> Channel Passage and Other Poems) -- sing - (in memory of William Morris and Edward Burne Jones) --, O - (<A> CHANNEL PASSAGE 1855) -- Goddess! - (Forth from Calais) -- Peleus' - (at dawn of night) -- son - (when sunset summer on autumn shone) --;
His wrath - (Fared <the> steamer alert and loud through seas whence only <the> sun was gone) -- pernicious - (Soft and sweet as <the> sky they smiled) --, who ten - (and bade man welcome) -- thousand - (<a> dim sweet hour Gleamed and whispered in wind and sea) -- woes - (and heaven was fair as <a> field in flower) --
Caused - (Stars fulfilled <the> desire of <the> darkling world as with music) -- to Achaia's - (<the> starbright air Made <the> face of <the> sea) -- host - (if aught may make <the> face of <the> sea) --, sent - (more fair) -- many - (Whence came change) -- <a> soul - (Was <the> sweet night weary of rest) --
Illustrious - (What anguish awoke in <the> dark) -- into - (Sudden) -- Ades - (sublime) -- premature - (<the> strong storm spake) --,
And Heroes - (we heard <the> thunders as hounds that bark) -- gave - (Lovelier if aught may be lovelier than stars) -- (so stood - (we saw <the> lightnings exalt <the> sky) -- <the> will - (Living and lustrous and rapturous as love that is born but to quicken and lighten and die) -- of Jove - (Pg 280) --)5
To dogs - (Heaven's own heart at its highest of delight found utterance in music and semblance in fire) -- and to all - (Thunder on thunder exulted) -- ravening - (rejoicing to live and to satiate <the> night's desire) -- fowls - (And <the> night was alive and anhungered of life as <a> tiger from toils cast free) -- <a> prey - (And <a> rapture of rage made joyous <the> spirit and strength of <the> soul of <the> sea) --,
When fierce - (All the weight of <the> wind bore down on it) -- dispute - (freighted with death for fraught) -- had separated - (And <the> keen waves kindled and quickened as things transfigured or things distraught) -- once - (And madness fell on them laughing and leaping) --
<The> noble - (and madness came on <the> wind) -- Chief - (And <the> might and <the> light and <the> darkness of storm were as storm in <the> heart of Ind) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Such glory) --
Of Atreus - (such terror) --, Agamemnon - (such passion) --, King - (as lighten and harrow <the> far fierce East) -- of men - (Rang) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Chastelard, a tragedy"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/2379/pg2379.html ,  

Chastelard, a tragedy.

PERSONS.
MARY STUART. MARY BEATON. MARY SEYTON. MARY CARMICHAEL. MARY HAMILTON. PIERRE DE BOSCOSEL DE CHASTELARD. DARNLEY. MURRAY. RANDOLPH. MORTON. LINDSAY. FATHER BLACK.

Guards, Burgesses, a Preacher, Citizens, &c.

Another Yle is there toward the Northe, in the See Occean, where that ben fulle cruele and ful evele Wommen of Nature: and thei han precious Stones in hire Eyen; and their ben of that kynde, that zif they beholden ony man, thei slen him anon with the beholdynge, as dothe the Basilisk.

MAUNDEVILE'S Voiage and Travaile, Ch. xxviii.
I DEDICATE THIS PLAY, AS A PARTIAL EXPRESSION OF REVERENCE AND GRATITUDE, TO THE CHIEF OF LIVING POETS; TO THE FIRST DRAMATIST OF HIS AGE; TO THE GREATEST EXILE, AND THEREFORE TO THE GREATEST MAN OF FRANCE; TO VICTOR HUGO.
ACT I.
MARY BEATON.
SCENE I.—The Upper Chamber in Holyrood.

The four MARIES.

MARY BEATON (sings):—

  1.

Le navire
  Est a l'eau;
 Le navire
  Est a l'eau;
  Entends rire
  Ce gros flot
  Que fait luire
  Et bruire
  Le vieux sire
  Aquilo..~ ~


"Chastelard, tragedy"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Chastelard, tragedy"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/+cp                       Iliad


1.  
"MARY STUART"                            (B/S + ook/C2)/+cp                                Book

PERSONS                                  (B/S + ook/C1)/+cp                                Book

2.
 "MARY BEATON"                        ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/C2)/+cp                       "I/One"

3.
"MARY SEYTON"                       ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/C2)/+cp                     Achilles

4.
"MARY CARMICHAEL"                             (s/S + ing/C2)/+cp                           sing

5.
"MARY HAMILTON"                             ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/C2)/+cp                         O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (PERSONS, MARY STUART) -- I/One - (MARY BEATON) --.

Achilles - (MARY SEYTON) -- sing - (MARY CARMICHAEL) --, O - (MARY HAMILTON) -- Goddess! - (PIERRE DE BOSCOSEL DE CHASTELARD) -- Peleus' - (DARNLEY) -- son - (MURRAY) --;
His wrath - (RANDOLPH) -- pernicious - (MORTON) --, who ten - (LINDSAY) -- thousand - (FATHER BLACK) -- woes - (Guards) --
Caused - (Burgesses) -- to Achaia's - (<a> Preacher) -- host - (Citizens) --, sent - (&c; and c) -- many - (Another Yle is there toward <the> Northe) -- <a> soul - (in <the> See Occean) --
Illustrious - (where that ben fulle cruele and ful evele Wommen of Nature) -- into - (and thei han precious Stones in hire Eyen) -- Ades - (and their ben of that kynde) -- premature - (that zif they beholden ony man) --,
And Heroes - (thei slen him anon with <the> beholdynge) -- gave - (as dothe <the> Basilisk) -- (so stood - (MAUNDEVILE'S Voiage and Travaile) -- <the> will - (Ch) -- of Jove - (xxviii, 28) --)5
To dogs - (I dedicate this play) -- and to all - (as <a> partial expression of reverence and gratitude) -- ravening - (to <the> chief of living poets) -- fowls - (to <the> first dramatist of his age) -- <a> prey - (to <the> greatest exile) --,
When fierce - (and therefore to <the> greatest man of France) -- dispute - (to Victor Hugo) -- had separated - (ACT I) -- once - (Mary Beaton) --
<The> noble - (SCENE I) -- Chief - (<The> Upper Chamber in Holyrood) -- Achilles from <the> son - (<The> four Maries) --
Of Atreus - (Mary Beaton) --, Agamemnon - (sings) --, King - (1/One) -- of men - (<Le> navire Est a <l'>eau) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "A Dark Month"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18524/18524-h/18524-h.htm ,  
A DARK MONTH

STUDIES IN SONG : A CENTURY OF ROUNDELS : SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS : THE HEPTALOGIA : ETC.

A DARK MONTH

"La maison sans enfants!"—Victor Hugo.
I
A month without sight of the sun Rising or reigning or setting Through days without use of the day, Who calls it the month of May? The sense of the name is undone And the sound of it fit for forgetting.
We shall not feel if the sun rise, We shall not care when it sets: If a nightingale make night's air As noontide, why should we care? Till a light of delight that is done rise, Extinguishing grey regrets;
Till a child's face lighten again On the twilight of older faces; Till a child's voice fall as the dew On furrows with heat parched through And all but hopeless of grain, Refreshing the desolate places—
Fall clear on the ears of us hearkening And hungering for food of the sound And thirsting for joy of his voice: Till the hearts in us hear and rejoice, And the thoughts of them doubting and darkening Rejoice with a glad thing found.
When the heart of our gladness is gone, What comfort is left with us after? When the light of our eyes is away, What glory remains upon May, What blessing of song is thereon If we drink not the light of his laughter?
No small sweet face with the daytime To welcome, warmer than noon! No sweet small voice as a bird's To bring us the day's first words! Mid May for us here is not Maytime: No summer begins with June.
A whole dead month in the dark, A dawn in the mists that o'ercome her Stifled and smothered and sad— Swift speed to it, barren and bad! And return to us, voice of the lark, And remain with us, sunlight of summer.

II

Alas, what right has the dawn to glimmer, ~ ~


"Dark Month"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"From Swinburne's Collected Poetical Works Vol. V"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C1)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Dark Month"                         ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp                         Iliad


1.
"STUDIES IN SONG"                          (B/S + ook/C2)/Ch/+bp                         Book

2.               <A> CENTURY OF ROUNDELS

"CENTURY OF ROUNDELS"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/C2)/Ch/+bp                "I/One"

3.
"SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS"              ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+bp               Achilles

4.               <THE> HEPTALOGIA

HEPTALOGIA                             (s/S + ing/C2)/Ch/+bp                               sing

5.
"ETC"                                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/C2)/Ch/+bp                              O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (STUDIES IN SONG) -- I/One - (<A> CENTURY OF ROUNDELS) --.

Achilles - (SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS) -- sing - (<THE> HEPTALOGIA) --, O - (ETC) -- Goddess! - (<A> DARK MONTH) -- Peleus' - (<La> maison sans enfants) -- son - (Victor Hugo) --;
His wrath - (I/One) -- pernicious - (<A> month without sight of <the> sun Rising or reigning or setting Through days without use of <the> day) --, who ten - (Who calls it <the> month of May) -- thousand - (<The> sense of <the> name is undone And <the> sound of it fit for forgetting) -- woes - (We shall not feel if <the> sun rise) --
Caused - (We shall not care when it sets) -- to Achaia's - (If <a> nightingale make night's air As noontide) -- host - (why should we care) --, sent - (Till <a> light of delight that is done rise) -- many - (Extinguishing grey regrets) -- <a> soul - (Till <a> child's face lighten again On <the> twilight of older faces) --
Illustrious - (Till <a> child's voice fall as <the> dew On furrows with heat parched through And all but hopeless of grain) -- into - (Refreshing <the> desolate places) -- Ades - (Fall clear on <the> ears of us hearkening And hungering for food of <the> sound And thirsting for joy of his voice) -- premature - (Till <the> hearts in us hear and rejoice) --,
And Heroes - (And <the> thoughts of them doubting and darkening Rejoice with <a> glad thing found) -- gave - (When <the> heart of our gladness is gone) -- (so stood - (What comfort is left with us after) -- <the> will - (When <the> light of our eyes is away) -- of Jove - (What glory remains upon May) --)5
To dogs - (What blessing of song is thereon If we drink not <the> light of his laughter) -- and to all - (No small sweet face with <the> daytime To welcome) -- ravening - (warmer than noon) -- fowls - (No sweet small voice as <a> bird's To bring us <the> day's first words) -- <a> prey - (Mid May for us here is not Maytime) --,
When fierce - (No summer begins with June) -- dispute - (<A> whole dead month in <the> dark) -- had separated - (<A> dawn in <the> mists that o'ercome her Stifled and smothered and sad) -- once - (Swift speed to it) --
<The> noble - (barren and bad) -- Chief - (And return to us) -- Achilles from <the> son - (voice of <the> lark) --
Of Atreus - (And remain with us) --, Agamemnon - (sunlight of summer) --, King - (II/Two) -- of men - (Alas) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "The Duke of Gandia"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext04/dkgr10h.htm ,    
The Duke of Gandia

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

POPE ALEXANDER VI.
FRANCESCO BORGIA, Duke of Gandia   }his sons
CÆSAR BORGIA, Cardinal of Valencia }
DON MICHELE COREGLIA, called MICHELOTTO, agent for Cæsar Borgia.
GIORGIO SCHIAVONE, a Tiber waterman.
TWO ASSASSINS.
AN OFFICER of the Papal Household.
VANNOZZA CATANEI, surnamed LA ROSA, concubine to the Pope.
LUCREZIA BORGIA, daughter to Alexander and Vannozza.
SCENE: ROME.
TIME: JUNE 14 - JULY 22, 1497.

SCENE I

The Vatican
Enter CÆSAR and VANNOZZA
CÆSAR
Now, mother, though thou love my brother more,
Am I not more thy son than he?
VANNOZZA
      Not more.
CÆSAR
Have I more Spaniard in me - less of thee?
Did our Most Holiest father thrill thy womb
With more Italian passion than brought forth
Me?
VANNOZZA
   Child, thine elder never was as thou -
Spake never thus.
CÆSAR
      I doubt it not.  But I, ~ ~


"Duke of Gandia"                 (Sw/S + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Duke of Gandia"                      ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                        Iliad


1.
"PERSONS REPRESENTED"                       (B/S + ook/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Book

2.               <A> CENTURY OF ROUNDELS

"POPE ALEXANDER VI"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "I/One"

3.
"FRANCESCO BORGIA"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+cp                  Achilles

"his sons"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/C1)/Ch/+cp                    Achilles

4.
"Duke of Gandia"                            (s/S + ing/C2)/Ch/+cp                            sing

5.
"CÆSAR BORGIA"                       ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/C2)/Ch/+cp                           O

"his sons"                               ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/C1)/Ch/+cp                           O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (PERSONS REPRESENTED) -- I/One - (POPE ALEXANDER VI) --.

Achilles - (FRANCESCO BORGIA, his sons) -- sing - (Duke of Gandia) --, O - (CÆSAR BORGIA, his sons) -- Goddess! - (Cardinal of Valencia) -- Peleus' - (DON MICHELE COREGLIA) -- son - (called MICHELOTTO) --;
His wrath - (agent for Cæsar Borgia) -- pernicious - (GIORGIO SCHIAVONE) --, who ten - (<a> Tiber waterman) -- thousand - (TWO ASSASSINS) -- woes - (<AN> OFFICER of <the> Papal Household) --
Caused - (VANNOZZA CATANEI) -- to Achaia's - (surnamed LA ROSA) -- host - (concubine to <the> Pope) --, sent - (LUCREZIA BORGIA) -- many - (daughter to Alexander and Vannozza) -- <a> soul - (SCENE) --
Illustrious - (ROME) -- into - (TIME) -- Ades - (JUNE 14) -- premature - (JULY 22) --,
And Heroes - (1497) -- gave - (SCENE I) -- (so stood - (<The> Vatican) -- <the> will - (Enter CÆSAR and VANNOZZA) -- of Jove - (CÆSAR) --)5
To dogs - (Now) -- and to all - (mother) -- ravening - (though thou love my brother more) -- fowls - (Am I not more thy son than he) -- <a> prey - (VANNOZZA) --,
When fierce - (Not more) -- dispute - (CÆSAR) -- had separated - (Have I more Spaniard in me) -- once - (less of thee) --
<The> noble - (Did our Most Holiest father thrill thy womb With more Italian passion than brought forth Me) -- Chief - (VANNOZZA) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Child) --
Of Atreus - (thine elder never was as thou) --, Agamemnon - (Spake never thus) --, King - (CÆSAR) -- of men - (I doubt it not) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Erechtheus"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18550/18550-h/18550-h.htm ,    
ERECHTHEUS.

PERSONS.
ERECHTHEUS.
CHORUS OF ATHENIAN ELDERS.
PRAXITHEA.
CHTHONIA.
HERALD OF EUMOLPUS.
MESSENGER.
ATHENIAN HERALD.
ATHENA.

ERECHTHEUS.
Mother of life and death and all men's days, Earth, whom I chief of all men born would bless, And call thee with more loving lips than theirs Mother, for of this very body of thine And living blood I have my breath and live, Behold me, even thy son, me crowned of men, Me made thy child by that strong cunning God Who fashions fire and iron, who begat Me for a sword and beacon-fire on thee, Me fosterling of Pallas, in her shade Reared, that I first might pay the nursing debt, Hallowing her fame with flower of third-year feasts, And first bow down the bridled strength of steeds To lose the wild wont of their birth, and bear Clasp of man's knees and steerage of his hand, Or fourfold service of his fire-swift wheels That whirl the four-yoked chariot; me the king Who stand before thee naked now, and cry, O holy and general mother of all men born, But mother most and motherliest of mine, Earth, for I ask thee rather of all the Gods, What have we done? what word mistimed or work Hath winged the wild feet of this timeless curse To fall as fire upon us? Lo, I stand Here on this brow's crown of the city's head That crowns its lovely body, till death's hour Waste it; but now the dew of dawn and birth Is fresh upon it from thy womb, and we Behold it born how beauteous; one day more I see the world's wheel of the circling sun Roll up rejoicing to regard on earth This one thing goodliest, fair as heaven or he, Worth a God's gaze or strife of Gods; ~ ~


Erechtheus                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp                "Swinburne's work"
"Tragedy New Edition"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+bp                "Swinburne's work"

Erechtheus                             ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/+bp                           Iliad


1.
ERECHTHEUS                              (B/T + ook/C2)/+bp                                Book

PERSONS                                  (B/T + ook/C1)/+bp                                Book

2.
"CHORUS OF ATHENIAN ELDERS"               ([ŋ=  w=]/T + One/C2)/+bp               "I/One"

3.
PRAXITHEA                        ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Achilles/C2)/+bp                         Achilles

4.
CHTHONIA                                 (s/T + ing/C2)/+bp                                  sing

5.
"HERALD OF EUMOLPUS"                        ([ŋ=  w=]/T + O/C2)/+bp                       O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (PERSONS,  ERECHTHEUS) -- I/One - (CHORUS OF ATHENIAN ELDERS) --.

Achilles - (PRAXITHEA) -- sing - (CHTHONIA) --, O - (HERALD OF EUMOLPUS) -- Goddess! - (MESSENGER) -- Peleus' - (ATHENIAN HERALD) -- son - (ATHENA) --;
His wrath - (ERECHTHEUS) -- pernicious - (Mother of life and death and all men's days) --, who ten - (Earth) -- thousand - (whom I chief of all men born would bless) -- woes - (And call thee with more loving lips than theirs Mother) --
Caused - (for of this very body of thine And living blood I have my breath and live) -- to Achaia's - (Behold me) -- host - (even thy son) --, sent - (me crowned of men) -- many - (Me made thy child by that strong cunning God Who fashions fire and iron) -- <a> soul - (who begat Me for <a> sword and beacon) --
Illustrious - (fire on thee) -- into - (Me fosterling of Pallas) -- Ades - (in her shade Reared) -- premature - (that I first might pay <the> nursing debt) --,
And Heroes - (Hallowing her fame with flower of third-year feasts) -- gave - (And first bow down the bridled strength of steeds To lose <the> wild wont of their birth) -- (so stood - (and bear Clasp of man's knees and steerage of his hand) -- <the> will - (Or fourfold service of his fire) -- of Jove - (swift wheels That whirl <the> four) --)5
To dogs - (yoked chariot) -- and to all - (me <the> king Who stand before thee naked now) -- ravening - (and cry) -- fowls - (O holy and general mother of all men born) -- <a> prey - (But mother most and motherliest of mine) --,
When fierce - (Earth) -- dispute - (for I ask thee rather of all <the> Gods) -- had separated - (What have we done) -- once - (what word mistimed or work Hath winged <the> wild feet of this timeless curse To fall as fire upon us) --
<The> noble - (Lo) -- Chief - (I stand Here on this brow's crown of <the> city's head That crowns its lovely body) -- Achilles from <the> son - (till death's hour Waste it) --
Of Atreus - (but now <the> dew of dawn and birth Is fresh upon it from thy womb) --, Agamemnon - (and we Behold it born how beauteous) --, King - (one day more I see <the> world's wheel of <the> circling sun Roll up rejoicing to regard on earth This one thing goodliest) -- of men - (fair as heaven or he) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Heptalogia"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18210/18210-h/18210-h.htm ,    
Heptalogia

SPECIMENS OF MODERN POETS

<THE> HEPTALOGIA OR <THE> SEVEN AGAINST SENSE <A> CAP WITH SEVEN BELLS

<THE> HIGHER PANTHEISM IN <A> NUTSHELL

One, who is not, we see: but one, whom we see not, is: Surely this is not that: but that is assuredly this.
What, and wherefore, and whence? for under is over and under: If thunder could be without lightning, lightning could be without thunder.
Doubt is faith in the main: but faith, on the whole, is doubt: We cannot believe by proof: but could we believe without?
Why, and whither, and how? for barley and rye are not clover: Neither are straight lines curves: yet over is under and over.
Two and two may be four: but four and four are not eight: Fate and God may be twain: but God is the same thing as fate.
Ask a man what he thinks, and get from a man what he feels: God, once caught in the fact, shows you a fair pair of heels.
Body and spirit are twins: God only knows which is which: The soul squats down in the flesh, like a tinker drunk in a ditch.
More is the whole than a part: but half is more than the whole: Clearly, ~ ~


Heptalogia                   (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp                "Swinburne's work"

Heptalogia                              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/+cp                           Iliad


1.
"SPECIMENS OF MODERN POETS"                   (B/T + ook/C2)/+cp                       Book

2.           <THE> HEPTALOGIA OR <THE> SEVEN AGAINST SENSE <A> CAP WITH SEVEN BELLS

"Heptalogia or seven against sense cap with seven bells"               ([ŋ=  w=]/T + One/C2)/+cp               "I/One"

3.             <THE> HIGHER PANTHEISM IN <A> NUTSHELL

"higher pantheism in nutshell"               ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Achilles/C2)/+cp                Achilles

4.
One                                    (s/T + ing/C2)/+cp                                     sing

5.
"who is not"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/T + O/C2)/+cp                                 O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (SPECIMENS OF MODERN POETS) -- I/One - (<THE> HEPTALOGIA OR <THE> SEVEN AGAINST SENSE <A> CAP WITH SEVEN BELLS) --.

Achilles - (<THE> HIGHER PANTHEISM IN <A> NUTSHELL) -- sing - (One) --, O - (who is not) -- Goddess! - (we see) -- Peleus' - (but one) -- son - (whom we see not) --;
His wrath - (is) -- pernicious - (Surely this is not that) --, who ten - (but that is assuredly this) -- thousand - (What) -- woes - (and wherefore) --
Caused - (and whence) -- to Achaia's - (for under is over and under) -- host - (If thunder could be without lightning) --, sent - (lightning could be without thunder) -- many - (Doubt is faith in <the> main) -- <a> soul - (but faith) --
Illustrious - (on <the> whole) -- into - (is doubt) -- Ades - (We cannot believe by proof) -- premature - (but could we believe without) --,
And Heroes - (Why) -- gave - (and whither) -- (so stood - (and how) -- <the> will - (for barley and rye are not clover) -- of Jove - (Neither are straight lines curves) --)5
To dogs - (yet over is under and over) -- and to all - (Two and two may be four) -- ravening - (but four and four are not eight) -- fowls - (Fate and God may be twain) -- <a> prey - (but God is <the> same thing as fate) --,
When fierce - (Ask <a> man what he thinks) -- dispute - (and get from <a> man what he feels) -- had separated - (God) -- once - (once caught in <the> fact) --
<The> noble - (shows you <a> fair pair of heels) -- Chief - (Body and spirit are twins) -- Achilles from <the> son - (God only knows which is which) --
Of Atreus - (<The> soul squats down in <the> flesh) --, Agamemnon - (like <a> tinker drunk in <a> ditch) --, King - (More is <the> whole than <a> part) -- of men - (but half is more than <the> whole) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22421/22421-h/22421-h.htm ,    
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/22421/22421-h/i.html ,    
Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2

Hesperides:
or.
The works both human & divine of Robert Herrick Esq
Ovid.
Effugient avidos Caramina nofira Rogos.

TO THE Most Illustrious and Most Hopeful Prince.

CHARLES,

PRINCE OF WALES.
Well may my book come forth like public day When such a light as you are leads the way, Who are my work's creator, and alone The flame of it, and the expansion. And look how all those heavenly lamps acquire Light from the sun, that inexhausted fire, So all my morn and evening stars from you Have their existence, and their influence too. Full is my book of glories; but all these By you become immortal substances.

HESPERIDES.

1. THE ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK.
I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds and bowers, Of April, May, of June and July-flowers; I sing of May-poles, hock-carts, wassails, wakes, Of bridegrooms, brides and of their bridal cakes; I write of youth, of love, and have access By these to sing of cleanly wantonness; I sing of dews, of rains, and piece by piece Of balm, of oil, of spice and ambergris; I sing of times trans-shifting, and I write How roses first came red and lilies white; I write of groves,


"Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp                "Swinburne's work"

"Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2"              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp              Iliad


1.
Hesperides                              (B/T + ook/C2)/Ch/+bp                               Book

2.
or                                ([ŋ=  w=]/T + One/C2)/Ch/+bp                          "I/One"

3.                <The> works both human & divine of Robert Herrick Esq

"works both human & divine of Robert Herrick Esq"                ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+bp               Achilles

4.
Ovid                                      (s/T + ing/C2)/Ch/+bp                               sing

5.
"Effugient avidos Caramina nofira Rogos"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + O/C2)/Ch/+bp                  O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (Hesperides) -- I/One - (or) --.

Achilles - (<The> works both human & divine of Robert Herrick Esq) -- sing - (Ovid) --, O - (Effugient avidos Caramina nofira Rogos) -- Goddess! - (TO <the> Most Illustrious and Most Hopeful Prince) -- Peleus' - (CHARLES) -- son - (PRINCE OF WALES) --;
His wrath - (Well may my book come forth like public day When such <a> light as you are leads <the> way) -- pernicious - (Who are my work's creator) --, who ten - (and alone <The> flame of it) -- thousand - (and <the> expansion) -- woes - (And look how all those heavenly lamps acquire Light from <the> sun) --
Caused - (that inexhausted fire) -- to Achaia's - (So all my morn and evening stars from you Have their existence) -- host - (and their influence too) --, sent - (Full is my book of glories) -- many - (but all these By you become immortal substances) -- <a> soul - (HESPERIDES) --
Illustrious - (1/One) -- into - (<THE> ARGUMENT OF HIS BOOK) -- Ades - (I sing of brooks) -- premature - (of blossoms) --,
And Heroes - (birds and bowers) -- gave - (Of April) -- (so stood - (May) -- <the> will - (of June and July) -- of Jove - (flowers) --)5
To dogs - (I sing of May) -- and to all - (poles) -- ravening - (hock) -- fowls - (carts) -- <a> prey - (wassails) --,
When fierce - (wakes) -- dispute - (Of bridegrooms) -- had separated - (brides and of their bridal cakes) -- once - (I write of youth) --
<The> noble - (of love) -- Chief - (and have access By these to sing of cleanly wantonness) -- Achilles from <the> son - (I sing of dews) --
Of Atreus - (of rains) --, Agamemnon - (and piece by piece Of balm) --, King - (of oil) -- of men - (of spice and ambergris) --.

Who them - (I sing of times trans) -- to strife - (shifting) -- impell'd - (and I write How roses first came red and lilies white) --?

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Locrine: a tragedy"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3325/pg3325.html ,  
Locrine: a tragedy

DEDICATION TO ALICE SWINBURNE.
I.
The love that comes and goes like wind or fire
Hath words and wings wherewith to speak and flee.
But love more deep than passion's deep desire,
Clear and inviolable as the unsounded sea,
What wings of words may serve to set it free,
To lift and lead it homeward? Time and death
Are less than love: or man's live spirit saith
False, when he deems his life is more than breath.
II.
No words may utter love; no sovereign song
Speak all it would for love's sake. Yet would I
Fain cast in moulded rhymes that do me wrong
Some little part of all my love: but why
Should weak and wingless words be fain to fly?
For us the years that live not are not dead:
Past days and present in our hearts are wed:
My song can say no more than love hath said.
III.
Love needs nor song nor speech to say what love
Would speak or sing, were speech and song not weak
To bear the sense-belated soul above
And bid the lips of silence breathe and speak.
Nor power nor will has love to find or seek
Words indiscoverable, ampler strains of song
Than ever hailed him fair or shewed him strong:
And less than these should do him worse than wrong.

IV.
We who remember not a day wherein
We have not loved each other,—who can see
No time, since time bade first our days begin,
Within the sweep of memory's wings, when we
Have known not what each other's love must be, -
We are well content to know it, and rest on this,
And call not words to witness that it is.
To love aloud is oft to love amiss.
V.
But if the gracious witness borne of words
Take not from speechless love the secret grace
That binds it round with silence, and engirds
Its heart with memories fair as heaven's own face,
Let love take courage for a little space
To speak and be rebuked not of the soul,
Whose utterance, ere the unwitting speech be whole,
Rebukes itself, and craves again control.
VI.
A ninefold garland wrought of song-flowers nine
Wound each with each in chance-inwoven accord
Here at your feet I lay as on a shrine
Whereof the holiest love that lives is lord. ~ ~


"Locrine: tragedy"                  (Sw/T + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp                "Swinburne's work"

"Locrine: tragedy"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/T + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Iliad


1.
"dedication to Alice Swinburne"                   (B/T + ook/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Book

2.
"I/One"                              ([ŋ=  w=]/T + One/C2)/Ch/+cp                       "I/One"

3.                <The> love that comes and goes like wind or fire

" love that comes and goes like wind or fire"                ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+cp               Achilles

4.
"Hath words and wings wherewith to speak and flee"               (s/T + ing/C2)/Ch/+cp                 sing

5.
"But love more deep than passion's deep desire"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + O/C2)/Ch/+cp                  O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (dedication to Alice Swinburne) -- I/One - (I/One) --.

Achilles - (<The> love that comes and goes like wind or fire) -- sing - (Hath words and wings wherewith to speak and flee) --, O - (But love more deep than passion's deep desire) -- Goddess! - (Clear and inviolable as <the> unsounded sea) -- Peleus' - (What wings of words may serve to set it free) -- son - (To lift and lead it homeward) --;
His wrath - (Time and death Are less than love) -- pernicious - (or man's live spirit saith
False) --, who ten - (when he deems his life is more than breath) -- thousand - (II/Two) -- woes - (No words may utter love) --
Caused - (no sovereign song Speak all it would for love's sake) -- to Achaia's - (Yet would I Fain cast in moulded rhymes that do me wrong Some little part of all my love) -- host - (but why Should weak and wingless words be fain to fly) --, sent - (For us <the> years that live not are not dead) -- many - (Past days and present in our hearts are wed) -- <a> soul - (My song can say no more than love hath said) --
Illustrious - (III/Three) -- into - (Love needs nor song nor speech to say what love Would speak or sing) -- Ades - (were speech and song not weak To bear <the> sense) -- premature - (belated soul above And bid <the> lips of silence breathe and speak) --,
And Heroes - (Nor power nor will has love to find or seek Words indiscoverable) -- gave - (ampler strains of song Than ever hailed him fair or shewed him strong) -- (so stood - (And less than these should do him worse than wrong) -- <the> will - (IV/Four) -- of Jove - (We who remember not <a> day wherein We have not loved each other) --)5
To dogs - (who can see No time) -- and to all - (since time bade first our days begin) -- ravening - (Within <the> sweep of memory's wings) -- fowls - (when we Have known not what each other's love must be) -- <a> prey - (when we Have known not what each other's love must be) --,
When fierce - (and rest on this) -- dispute - (And call not words to witness that it is) -- had separated - (To love aloud is oft to love amiss) -- once - (V/Five) --
<The> noble - (But if <the> gracious witness borne of words Take not from speechless love <the> secret grace That binds it round with silence) -- Chief - (and engirds Its heart with memories fair as heaven's own face) -- Achillesfrom <the> son - (Let love take courage for <a> little space To speak and be rebuked not of <the> soul) --
Of Atreus - (Whose utterance) --, Agamemnon - (ere <the> unwitting speech be whole) --, King - (Rebukes itself) -- of men - (and craves again control) --.

Who them - (VI/Six) -- to strife - (<A> ninefold garland wrought of song) -- impell'd - (flowers nine Wound each with each in chance) --?

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18424/18424-h/18424-h.htm ,  
A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems

A MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY

To Theodore Watts

THE SEABOARD.

The sea is at ebb, and the sound of her utmost word
Is soft as the least wave’s lapse in a still small reach.
From bay into bay, on quest of a goal deferred,
From headland ever to headland and breach to breach
Where earth gives ear to the message that all days preach
With changes of gladness and sadness that cheer and chide,
The lone way lures me along by a chance untried
That haply, if hope dissolve not and faith be whole,
Not all for nought shall I seek, with a dream for guide.
The goal that is not, and ever again the goal.
The trackless ways are untravelled of sail or bird;
The hoar wave hardly recedes from the soundless beach.
The silence of instant noon goes nigh to be heard,
The viewless void to be visible: all and each,
A closure of calm no clamour of storm can breach
Concludes and confines and absorbs them on either side,
All forces of light and of life and the live world’s pride.
Sands hardly ruffled of ripples that hardly roll
Seem ever to show as in reach of a swift brief stride
The goal that is not, and ever again the goal.
The waves are a joy to the seamew, the meads to the herd,
And a joy to the heart is a goal that it may not reach.
No sense that for ever the limits of sense engird,
No hearing or sight that is vassal to form or speech,
Learns ever the secret that shadow and silence teach,
Hears ever the notes that or ever they swell subside,
Sees ever the light that lights not the loud world’s tide,
Clasps ever the cause of the lifelong scheme’s control
Wherethrough we pursue, till the waters of life be dried,
The goal that is not, and ever again the goal.
Friend, what have we sought or seek we, whate’er betide,
Though the seaboard shift its mark from afar descried,
But aims whence ever anew shall arise the soul?
Love, thought, song, life, but show for a glimpse and hide
The goal that is not, and ever again the goal.

A HAVEN. ~ ~


"Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/+bp              Iliad


1.                  <A> MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY To Theodore Watts <THE> SEABOARD

"MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY To Theodore Watts SEABOARD"                (B/GC/S/abT + ook/C2)/+bp                 Book

2.                  <The> sea is at ebb

"sea is at ebb"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + One/C2)/+bp                   "I/One"

3.        and <the> sound of her utmost word Is soft as <the> least wave’s lapse in <a> still small reach

"and sound of her utmost word Is soft as least wave’s lapse in still small reach"              ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Achilles/C2)/+bp              Achilles

4.
"From bay into bay"                        (s/GC/S/abT + ing/C2)/+bp                         sing

5.                  on quest of <a> goal deferred

"on quest of goal deferred"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + O/C2)/+bp                  O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (<A> MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY To Theodore Watts <THE> SEABOARD) -- I/One - (<The> sea is at ebb) --.

Achilles - (and <the> sound of her utmost word Is soft as <the> least wave’s lapse in <a> still small reach) -- sing - (From bay into bay) --, O - (on quest of <a> goal deferred) -- Goddess! - (From headland ever to headland and breach to breach Where earth gives ear to <the> message that all days preach With changes of gladness and sadness that cheer and chide) -- Peleus' - (<The> lone way lures me along by <a> chance untried That haply) -- son - (if hope dissolve not and faith be whole) --;
His wrath - (Not all for nought shall I seek) -- pernicious - (with <a> dream for guide) --, who ten - (<The> goal that is not) -- thousand - (and ever again <the> goal) -- woes - (<The> trackless ways are untravelled of sail or bird) --
Caused - (<The> hoar wave hardly recedes from <the> soundless beach) -- to Achaia's - (<The> silence of instant noon goes nigh to be heard) -- host - (<The> viewless void to be visible) --, sent - (all and each) -- many - (<A> closure of calm no clamour of storm can breach Concludes and confines and absorbs them on either side) -- <a> soul - (All forces of light and of life and <the> live world’s pride) --
Illustrious - (Sands hardly ruffled of ripples that hardly roll Seem ever to show as in reach of <a> swift brief stride <The> goal that is not) -- into - (and ever again <the> goal) -- Ades - (<The> waves are <a> joy to <the> seamew) -- premature - (<the> meads to <the> herd) --,
And Heroes - (And <a> joy to <the> heart is <a> goal that it may not reach) -- gave - (No sense that for ever <the> limits of sense engird) -- (so stood - (No hearing or sight that is vassal to form or speech) -- <the> will - (Learns ever <the> secret that shadow and silence teach) -- of Jove - (Hears ever <the> notes that or ever they swell subside) --)5
To dogs - (Sees ever <the> light that lights not <the> loud world’s tide) -- and to all - (Clasps ever <the> cause of <the> lifelong scheme’s control Wherethrough we pursue) -- ravening - (till <the> waters of life be dried) -- fowls - (<The> goal that is not) -- <a> prey - (and ever again <the> goal) --,
When fierce - (Friend) -- dispute - (what have we sought or seek we) -- had separated - (whate’er betide) -- once - (Though <the> seaboard shift its mark from afar descried) --
<The> noble - (But aims whence ever anew shall arise <the> soul) -- Chief - (Love) -- Achilles from <the> son - (thought) --
Of Atreus - (song) --, Agamemnon - (life) --, King - (but show for <a> glimpse and hide <The> goal that is not) -- of men - (and ever again <the> goal) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Poems and Ballads Third Series"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18726/18726-h/18726-h.htm ,  
Poems and Ballads (Third Series)
Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III

POEMS & BALLADS
(SECOND AND THIRD SERIES)
AND
SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES

POEMS AND BALLADS
THIRD SERIES
TO
WILLIAM BELL SCOTT
POET AND PAINTER
I DEDICATE THESE POEMS
IN MEMORY OF MANY YEARS


MARCH: AN ODE
1887

I
Ere frost-flower and snow-blossom faded and fell, and the splendour of winter had passed out of sight, The ways of the woodlands were fairer and stranger than dreams that fulfil us in sleep with delight; The breath of the mouths of the winds had hardened on tree-tops and branches that glittered and swayed Such wonders and glories of blossomlike snow or of frost that outlightens all flowers till it fade That the sea was not lovelier than here was the land, nor the night than the day, nor the day than the night, Nor the winter sublimer with storm than the spring: such mirth had the madness and might in thee made, March, master of winds, bright minstrel and marshal of storms that enkindle the season they smite.

II
And now that the rage of thy rapture is satiate with revel and ravin and spoil of the snow, And the branches it brightened are broken, and shattered the tree-tops that only thy wrath could lay low, How should not thy lovers rejoice in thee, leader and lord of the year that exults to be born So strong in thy strength and so glad of thy gladness whose laughter puts winter and sorrow to scorn? Thou hast shaken the snows from thy wings, and the frost on thy forehead is molten: thy lips are aglow As a lover's that kindle with kissing, and earth, with her raiment and tresses yet wasted and torn, Takes breath as she smiles in the grasp of thy passion to feel through her spirit the sense of thee flow.

III
Fain, fain would we see but again for an hour what the wind and the sun have dispelled and consumed, Those full deep swan-soft feathers of snow with whose luminous burden the branches implumed Hung heavily, curved as a half-bent bow, and fledged not as birds are, but petalled as flowers, Each tree- ~ ~


"Poems and Ballads Third Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C1)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems and Ballads Third Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/+cp              Iliad


1.
"POEMS & BALLADS"                      (B/GC/S/abT + ook/C2)/+cp                        Book

2.
"Second and Third Series"               ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + One/C2)/+cp               "I/One"

3.             AND SONGS OF <THE> SPRINGTIDES

"AND SONGS OF SPRINGTIDES"              ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Achilles/C2)/+cp              Achilles

4.
"poems and ballads third series to William Bell Scott poet and painter I dedicate these poems in memory of many years"              (s/GC/S/abT + ing/C2)/+cp              sing

5.
MARCH                            ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + O/C2)/+cp                             O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (POEMS & BALLADS) -- I/One - (SECOND AND THIRD SERIES) --.

Achilles - (AND SONGS OF SPRINGTIDES) -- sing - (poems and ballads third series to William Bell Scott poet and painter I dedicate these poems in memory of many years) --, O - (MARCH) -- Goddess! - (<AN> ODE 1887) -- Peleus' - (I/One) -- son - (Ere frost) --;
His wrath - (flower and snow) -- pernicious - (blossom faded and fell) --, who ten - (and <the> splendour of winter had passed out of sight) -- thousand - (<The> ways of <the> woodlands were fairer and stranger than dreams that fulfil us in sleep with delight) -- woes - (<The> breath of <the> mouths of <the> winds had hardened on tree) --
Caused - (tops and branches that glittered and swayed Such wonders and glories of blossomlike snow or of frost that outlightens all flowers till it fade That <the> sea was not lovelier than here was <the> land) -- to Achaia's - (nor <the> night than <the> day) -- host - (nor <the> day than <the> night) --, sent - (Nor <the> winter sublimer with storm than <the> spring) -- many - (such mirth had <the> madness and might in thee made) -- <a> soul - (March) --
Illustrious - (master of winds) -- into - (bright minstrel and marshal of storms that enkindle <the> season they smite) -- Ades - (II/Two) -- premature - (And now that <the> rage of thy rapture is satiate with revel and ravin and spoil of <the> snow) --,
And Heroes - (And <the> branches it brightened are broken) -- gave - (and shattered <the> tree) -- (so stood - (tops that only thy wrath could lay low) -- <the> will - (How should not thy lovers rejoice in thee) -- of Jove - (leader and lord of <the> year that exults to be born So strong in thy strength and so glad of thy gladness whose laughter puts winter and sorrow to scorn) --)5
To dogs - (Thou hast shaken <the> snows from thy wings) -- and to all - (and <the> frost on thy forehead is molten) -- ravening - (thy lips are aglow As <a> lover's that kindle with kissing) -- fowls - (and earth) -- <a> prey - (with her raiment and tresses yet wasted and torn) --,
When fierce - (Takes breath as she smiles in <the> grasp of thy passion to feel through her spirit <the> sense of thee flow) -- dispute - (III/Three) -- had separated - (Fain) -- once - (fain would we see but again for <an> hour what <the> wind and <the> sun have dispelled and consumed) --
<The> noble - (Those full deep swan) -- Chief - (soft feathers of snow with whose luminous burden <the> branches implumed Hung heavily) -- Achilles from <the> son - (curved as <a> half) --
Of Atreus - (bent bow) --, Agamemnon - (and fledged not as birds are) --, King - (but petalled as flowers) -- of men - (Each tree) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Poems & Ballads First Series"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/35402/35402-h/35402-h.htm ,  
Poems & Ballads First Series

TO
THEODORE WATTS-DUNTON

DEDICATORY EPISTLE
To my best and dearest friend I dedicate the first collected edition of my poems, and to him I address what I have to say on the occasion.

 
You will agree with me that it is impossible for any man to undertake the task of commentary, however brief and succinct, on anything he has done or tried to do, without incurring the charge of egoism. But there are two kinds of egoism, the furtive and the frank: and the outspoken and open-hearted candour of Milton and Wordsworth, Corneille and Hugo, is not the least or the lightest of their claims to the regard as well as the respect or the reverence of their readers. Even if I were worthy to claim kinship with the lowest or with the highest of these deathless names, I would not seek to shelter myself under the shadow of its authority. The question would still remain open on all sides. Whether it is worth while for any man to offer any remarks or for any other man to read his remarks on his own work, his own ambition, or his own attempts, he cannot of course determine. If there are great examples of abstinence from such a doubtful enterprise, there are likewise great examples to the contrary. As long as the writer can succeed in evading the kindred charges and the cognate risks of vanity and humility, there can be no reason why he should not undertake it. And when he has nothing to regret and nothing to recant, when he finds nothing that he could wish to cancel, to alter, or to unsay, in any page he has ever laid before his reader, he need not be seriously troubled by the inevitable consciousness that the work of his early youth is not and cannot be unnaturally unlike the work of a very young man. This would be no excuse for it, if it were in any sense bad work: if it be so, no apology would avail; and I certainly have none to offer.

It is now thirty-six years since my first volume of miscellaneous verse, lyrical and dramatic and elegiac and generally heterogeneous, had as quaint a reception and as singular a fortune as I have ever heard or read of. I do not think you will differ from my opinion that what is best in it cannot be divided from what is not so good by any other line of division than that which marks off mature from immature execution—in other words, complete from incomplete conception. For its author the most amusing and satisfying result of the clatter aroused by it was the deep diversion of collating and comparing the variously inaccurate verdicts of the scornful or mournful censors who insisted on regarding all the studies of passion or sensation attempted or achieved in it as either confessions of positive fact or excursions of absolute fancy. ~ ~


"Poems & Ballads First Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems & Ballads First Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+bp              Iliad


1.
"TO THEODORE WATTS"                   (B/GC/S/abT + ook/C2)/Ch/+bp                    Book

2.
DUNTON                       ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + One/C2)/Ch/+bp                    "I/One"

3. DEDICATORY EPISTLE To my best and dearest friend I dedicate <the> first collected edition of my poems

"DEDICATORY EPISTLE To my best and dearest friend I dedicate first collected edition of my poems"              ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+bp              Achilles

4.              and to him I address what I have to say on <the> occasion

"and to him I address what I have to say on occasion"             (s/GC/S/abT + ing/C2)/Ch/+bp           sing

5.    You will agree with me that it is impossible for any man to undertake <the> task of commentary

"You will agree with me that it is impossible for any man to undertake task of commentary"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + O/C2)/Ch/+bp                  O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (TO THEODORE WATTS) -- I/One - (DUNTON) --.

Achilles - (DEDICATORY EPISTLE To my best and dearest friend I dedicate <the> first collected edition of my poems) -- sing - (and to him I address what I have to say on <the> occasion) --, O - (You will agree with me that it is impossible for any man to undertake <the> task of commentary) -- Goddess! - (however brief and succinct) -- Peleus' - (on anything he has done or tried to do) -- son - (without incurring <the> charge of egoism) --;
His wrath - (But there are two kinds of egoism) -- pernicious - (<the> furtive and <the> frank) --, who ten - (and <the> outspoken and open) -- thousand - (hearted candour of Milton and Wordsworth) -- woes - (Corneille and Hugo) --
Caused - (is not <the> least or <the> lightest of their claims to <the> regard as well as the respect or <the> reverence of their readers) -- to Achaia's - (Even if I were worthy to claim kinship with <the> lowest or with <the> highest of these deathless names) -- host - (I would not seek to shelter myself under <the> shadow of its authority) --, sent - (<The> question would still remain open on all sides) -- many - (Whether it is worth while for any man to offer any remarks or for any other man to read his remarks on his own work) -- <a> soul - (his own ambition) --
Illustrious - (or his own attempts) -- into - (he cannot of course determine) -- Ades - (If there are great examples of abstinence from such a doubtful enterprise) -- premature - (there are likewise great examples to the contrary) --,
And Heroes - (As long as <the> writer can succeed in evading <the> kindred charges and <the> cognate risks of vanity and humility) -- gave - (there can be no reason why he should not undertake it) -- (so stood - (And when he has nothing to regret and nothing to recant) -- <the> will - (when he finds nothing that he could wish to cancel) -- of Jove - (to alter) --)5
To dogs - (or to unsay) -- and to all - (in any page he has ever laid before his reader) -- ravening - (he need not be seriously troubled by <the> inevitable consciousness that <the> work of his early youth is not and cannot be unnaturally unlike <the> work of a very young man) -- fowls - (This would be no excuse for it) -- <a> prey - (if it were in any sense bad work) --,
When fierce - (if it be so) -- dispute - (no apology would avail) -- had separated - (and I certainly have none to offer) -- once - (It is now thirty) --
<The> noble - (six years since my first volume of miscellaneous verse) -- Chief - (lyrical and dramatic and elegiac and generally heterogeneous) -- Achilles from <the> son - (had as quaint <a> reception and as singular <a> fortune as I have ever heard or read of) --
Of Atreus - (I do not think you will differ from my opinion that what is best in it cannot be divided from what is not so good by any other line of division than that which marks off mature from immature execution) --, Agamemnon - (in other words) --, King - (complete from incomplete conception) -- of men - (For its author <the> most amusing and satisfying result of <the> clatter aroused by it was <the> deep diversion of collating and comparing <the> variously inaccurate verdicts of the scornful or mournful censors who insisted on regarding all the studies of passion or sensation attempted or achieved in it as either confessions of positive fact or excursions of absolute fancy) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Poems & Ballads Second Series"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27401/27401-h/27401-h.htm ,  
Poems & Ballads Second Series

POEMS & BALLADS
(SECOND AND THIRD SERIES)
AND SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES

INSCRIBED TO RICHARD F. BURTON

    IN REDEMPTION OF AN OLD PLEDGE AND IN RECOGNITION OF A FRIENDSHIP WHICH I MUST ALWAYS COUNT AMONG THE HIGHEST HONOURS OF MY LIFE

THE LAST ORACLE
(A.D. 361)
Image 1: Greek Text

Years have risen and fallen in darkness or in twilight,
   Ages waxed and waned that knew not thee nor thine,
While the world sought light by night and sought not thy light,
   Since the sad last pilgrim left thy dark mid shrine.
Dark the shrine and dumb the fount of song thence welling,
   Save for words more sad than tears of blood, that said:
Tell the king, on earth has fallen the glorious dwelling,
   And the watersprings that spake are quenched and dead.
Not a cell is left the God, no roof, no cover
   In his hand the prophet laurel flowers no more.
And the great king's high sad heart, thy true last lover,
   Felt thine answer pierce and cleave it to the core.
         And he bowed down his hopeless head
            In the drift of the wild world's tide,
         And dying, Thou hast conquered, he said,
            Galilean; he said it, and died.
         And the world that was thine and was ours
         When the Graces took hands with the Hours
         Grew cold as a winter wave
         In the wind from a wide-mouthed grave,
         As a gulf wide open to swallow
            The light that the world held dear.
   O father of all of us, Paian, Apollo,
            Destroyer and healer, hear!

Age on age thy mouth was mute, ~ ~


"Poems & Ballads Second Series"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Swinburne's Poems Volume III"                (Sw/GC/S/abT + "-inburne's work"/C1)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Poems & Ballads Second Series"              ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + Iliad/C2)/Ch/+cp              Iliad


1.
"POEMS & BALLADS"                     (B/GC/S/abT + ook/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Book

2.
"Second and Third series"                ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + One/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "I/One"

3.                    AND SONGS OF <THE> SPRINGTIDES

"AND SONGS OF SPRINGTIDES"              ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Achilles/C2)/Ch/+cp              Achilles

4.
"INSCRIBED TO RICHARD F"                   (s/GC/S/abT + ing/C2)/Ch/+cp                 sing

5.
BURTON                          ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + O/C2)/Ch/+cp                          O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (POEMS & BALLADS) -- I/One - (SECOND AND THIRD SERIES) --.

Achilles - (AND SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES) -- sing - (INSCRIBED TO RICHARD F) --, O - (BURTON) -- Goddess! - (in redemption of <an> old pledge and in recognition of <a> friendship which i must always count among <the> highest honours of my life) -- Peleus' - (<the> last oracle) -- son - (A) --;
His wrath - (D) -- pernicious - (361) --, who ten - (Image 1/One) -- thousand - (Greek Text) -- woes - (Years have risen and fallen in darkness or in twilight) --
Caused - (Ages waxed and waned that knew not thee nor thine) -- to Achaia's - (While <the> world sought light by night and sought not thy light) -- host - (Since <the> sad last pilgrim left thy dark mid shrine) --, sent - (Dark <the> shrine and dumb <the> fount of song thence welling) -- many - (Save for words more sad than tears of blood) -- <a> soul - (that said) --
Illustrious - (Tell <the> king) -- into - (on earth has fallen <the> glorious dwelling) -- Ades - (And <the> watersprings that spake are quenched and dead) -- premature - (Not <a> cell is left <the> God) --,
And Heroes - (no roof) -- gave - (no cover In his hand <the> prophet laurel flowers no more) -- (so stood - (And <the> great king's high sad heart) -- <the> will - (thy true last lover) -- of Jove - (Felt thine answer pierce and cleave it to <the> core) --)5
To dogs - (And he bowed down his hopeless head In <the> drift of <the> wild world's tide) -- and to all - (And dying) -- ravening - (Thou hast conquered) -- fowls - (he said) -- <a> prey - (Galilean) --,
When fierce - (he said it) -- dispute - (and died) -- had separated - (And <the> world that was thine and was ours When <the> Graces took hands with <the> Hours Grew cold as <a> winter wave In <the> wind from <a> wide) -- once - (mouthed grave) --
<The> noble - (As <a> gulf wide open to swallow <The> light that <the> world held dear) -- Chief - (O father of all of us) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Paian) --
Of Atreus - (Apollo) --, Agamemnon - (Destroyer and healer) --, King - (hear) -- of men - (Age on age thy mouth was mute) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Rosamund, queen of the Lombards, a tragedy"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/2137/pg2137.html ,  
Rosamund, queen of the Lombards, a tragedy

PERSONS REPRESENTED

ALBOVINE, King of the Lombards.
ALMACHILDES, a young Lombard warrior.
NARSETES, an old leader and counsellor.

ROSAMUND, Queen of the Lombards
HILDEGARD, a noble Lombard maiden.
SCENE, VERONA
Time, June 573

ACT I

A hall in the Palace: a curtain drawn midway across it.

Enter ALBOVINE and NARSETES.

ALBOVINE.

This is no matter of the wars: in war
Thy king, old friend, is less than king of thine,
And comrade less than follower. Hast thou loved
Ever—loved woman, not as chance may love,
But as thou hast loved thy sword or friend—or me?
Thou hast shewn me love more stout of heart than death.
Death quailed before thee when thou gav'st me life,
Borne down in battle.

NARSETES.

Woman? As I love
Flowers in their season. A rose is but a rose.

ALBOVINE.

Dost thou know rose from thistle or bindweed? Man,
Speak as our north wind speaks, if harsh and hard -
Truth.

NARSETES.

White I know from red, and dark from bright,
And milk from blood in hawthorn- ~ ~


"Rosamund, queen of Lombards, tragedy"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Rosamund, queen of Lombards, tragedy"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/+bp              Iliad


1.
"PERSONS REPRESENTED"                   (B/C2 + ook/GC/S/abT)/+bp                     Book

2.
ALBOVINE                        ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/GC/S/abT)/+bp                     "I/One"

3.                King of <the> Lombards

"King of Lombards"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 Achilles

4.
ALMACHILDES                           (s/C2 + ing/GC/S/abT)/+bp                           sing

5.                <a> young Lombard warrior

"young Lombard warrior"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (PERSONS REPRESENTED) -- I/One - (ALBOVINE) --.

Achilles - (King of <the> Lombards) -- sing - (ALMACHILDES) --, O - (<a> young Lombard warrior) -- Goddess! - (NARSETES) -- Peleus' - (<an> old leader and counsellor) -- son - (ROSAMUND) --;
His wrath - (Queen of <the> Lombards HILDEGARD) -- pernicious - (<a> noble Lombard maiden) --, who ten - (SCENE) -- thousand - (VERONA Time) -- woes - (June 573) --
Caused - (ACT I <A> hall in <the> Palace) -- to Achaia's - (<a> curtain drawn midway across it) -- host - (Enter ALBOVINE and NARSETES) --, sent - (ALBOVINE) -- many - (This is no matter of <the> wars) -- <a> soul - (in war Thy king) --
Illustrious - (old friend) -- into - (is less than king of thine) -- Ades - (And comrade less than follower) -- premature - (Hast thou loved Ever) --,
And Heroes - (loved woman) -- gave - (not as chance may love) -- (so stood - (But as thou hast loved thy sword or friend) -- <the> will - (or me) -- of Jove - (Thou hast shewn me love more stout of heart than death) --)5
To dogs - (Death quailed before thee when thou gav'st me life) -- and to all - (Borne down in battle) -- ravening - (NARSETES) -- fowls - (Woman) -- <a> prey - (As I love Flowers in their season) --,
When fierce - (<A> rose is but <a> rose) -- dispute - (ALBOVINE) -- had separated - (Dost thou know rose from thistle or bindweed) -- once - (Man) --
<The> noble - (Speak as our north wind speaks) -- Chief - (if harsh and hard) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Truth) --
Of Atreus - (NARSETES) --, Agamemnon - (White I know from red) --, King - (and dark from bright) -- of men - (And milk from blood in hawthorn) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Songs Before Sunrise"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/4072/pg4072.html ,    
Songs Before Sunrise

DEDICATION TO JOSEPH MAZZINI

Take, since you bade it should bear,
   These, of the seed of your sowing,
      Blossom or berry or weed.
Sweet though they be not, or fair,
   That the dew of your word kept growing,
      Sweet at least was the seed.

Men bring you love-offerings of tears,
   And sorrow the kiss that assuages,
      And slaves the hate-offering of wrongs,
And time the thanksgiving of years,
   And years the thanksgiving of ages;
      I bring you my handful of songs.

If a perfume be left, if a bloom,
   Let it live till Italia be risen,
      To be strewn in the dust of her car
When her voice shall awake from the tomb
   England, and France from her prison,
      Sisters, a star by a star.

I bring you the sword of a song,
   The sword of my spirit's desire,
      Feeble; but laid at your feet,
That which was weak shall be strong,
   That which was cold shall take fire,
      That which was bitter be sweet.

It was wrought not with hands to smite,
   Nor hewn after swordsmiths' fashion,
      Nor tempered on anvil of steel;
But with visions and dreams of the night,
   But with hope, and the patience of passion,
      And the signet of love for a seal.

Be it witness, till one more strong,
   Till a loftier lyre, till a rarer
      Lute praise her better than I,
Be it witness before you, my song, ~ ~


"Songs Before Sunrise"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Songs Before Sunrise"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Iliad


1.
"DEDICATION TO JOSEPH MAZZINI Take"                   (B/C2 + ook/GC/S/abT)/+cp                     Book

2.
"since you bade it should bear"               ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "I/One"

3.
These                       ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/GC/S/abT)/+cp                       Achilles

4.                of <the> seed of your sowing

"of seed of your sowing"                      (s/C2 + ing/GC/S/abT)/+cp                       sing

5.
"Blossom or berry or weed"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (DEDICATION TO JOSEPH MAZZINI Take) -- I/One - (since you bade it should bear) --.

Achilles - (These) -- sing - (of <the> seed of your sowing) --, O - (Blossom or berry or weed) -- Goddess! - (Sweet though they be not) -- Peleus' - (or fair) -- son - (That <the> dew of your word kept growing) --;
His wrath - (Sweet at least was <the> seed) -- pernicious - (Men bring you love) --, who ten - (offerings of tears) -- thousand - (And sorrow <the> kiss that assuages) -- woes - (And slaves <the> hate) --
Caused - (offering of wrongs) -- to Achaia's - (And time <the> thanksgiving of years) -- host - (And years <the> thanksgiving of ages) --, sent - (I bring you my handful of songs) -- many - (If <a> perfume be left) -- <a> soul - (if <a> bloom) --
Illustrious - (Let it live till Italia be risen) -- into - (To be strewn in <the> dust of her car When her voice shall awake from <the> tomb England) -- Ades - (and France from her prison) -- premature - (Sisters) --,
And Heroes - (<a> star by <a> star) -- gave - (I bring you <the> sword of <a> song) -- (so stood - (<The> sword of my spirit's desire) -- <the> will - (Feeble) -- of Jove - (but laid at your feet) --)5
To dogs - (That which was weak shall be strong) -- and to all - (That which was cold shall take fire) -- ravening - (That which was bitter be sweet) -- fowls - (It was wrought not with hands to smite) -- <a> prey - (Nor hewn after swordsmiths' fashion) --,
When fierce - (Nor tempered on anvil of steel) -- dispute - (But with visions and dreams of <the> night) -- had separated - (But with hope) -- once - (and <the> patience of passion) --
<The> noble - (And <the> signet of love for <a> seal) -- Chief - (Be it witness) -- Achilles from <the> son - (till one more strong) --
Of Atreus - (Till <a> loftier lyre) --, Agamemnon - (till <a> rarer Lute praise her better than I) --, King - (Be it witness before you) -- of men - (my song) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Songs of the Springtides and Birthday Ode"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18287/18287-h/18287-h.htm ,    
Songs of the Springtides and Birthday Ode

SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES

DEDICATION
TO EDWARD JOHN TRELAWNY

A sea-mew on a sea-king's wrist alighting, As the north sea-wind caught and strained and curled The raven-figured flag that led men fighting From field to green field of the water-world, Might find such brief high favour at his hand For wings imbrued with brine, with foam impearled, As these my songs require at yours on land, That durst not save for love's free sake require, Being lightly born between the foam and sand, But reared by hope and memory and desire Of lives that were and life that is to be, Even such as filled his heavenlier song with fire Whose very voice, that sang to set man free, Was in your ears as ever in ours his lyre, Once, ere the flame received him from the sea.

THALASSIUS
Upon the flowery forefront of the year, One wandering by the grey-green April sea Found on a reach of shingle and shallower sand Inlaid with starrier glimmering jewellery Left for the sun's love and the light wind's cheer Along the foam-flowered strand Breeze-brightened, something nearer sea than land Though the last shoreward blossom-fringe was near, A babe asleep with flower-soft face that gleamed To sun and seaward as it laughed and dreamed, Too sure of either love for either's fear, Albeit so birdlike slight and light, it seemed Nor man nor mortal child of man, but fair As even its twin-born tenderer spray-flowers were, That the wind scatters like an Oread's hair.
For when July strewed fire on earth and sea The last time ere that year, Out of the flame of morn Cymothoe Beheld one brighter than the sunbright sphere Move toward her from its fieriest heart, whence trod The live sun's very God, Across the foam-bright water-ways that are As heavenlier heavens with star for answering star, And on her eyes and hair and maiden mouth Felt a kiss falling fierier than the South And heard above afar A noise of songs and wind-enamoured wings And lutes and lyres of milder and mightier strings, And round the resonant radiance of his car Where depth is one with height, Light heard as music, ~ ~


"Songs of Springtides and Birthday Ode"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne—Vol. III"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Songs of Springtides and Birthday Ode"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp              Iliad


1.    SONGS OF <THE> SPRINGTIDES DEDICATION TO EDWARD JOHN TRELAWNY <A> sea

"SONGS OF SPRINGTIDES DEDICATION TO EDWARD JOHN TRELAWNY sea"              (B/C2 + ook/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               Book

2.                       mew on <a> sea

"mew on sea"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                  "I/One"

3.
"king's wrist alighting"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp               Achilles

4.                       As <the> north sea

"As north sea"                         (s/C2 + ing/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                          sing

5.                 wind caught and strained and curled <The> raven

"wind caught and strained and curled raven"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (SONGS OF <THE> SPRINGTIDES DEDICATION TO EDWARD JOHN TRELAWNY <A> sea) -- I/One - (mew on <a> sea) --.

Achilles - (king's wrist alighting) -- sing - (As <the> north sea) --, O - (wind caught and strained and curled <The> raven) -- Goddess! - (figured flag that led men fighting From field to green field of <the> water) -- Peleus' - (world) -- son - (Might find such brief high favour at his hand For wings imbrued with brine) --;
His wrath - (with foam impearled) -- pernicious - (As these my songs require at yours on land) --, who ten - (That durst not save for love's free sake require) -- thousand - (Being lightly born between <the> foam and sand) -- woes - (But reared by hope and memory and desire Of lives that were and life that is to be) --
Caused - (Even such as filled his heavenlier song with fire Whose very voice) -- to Achaia's - (that sang to set man free) -- host - (Was in your ears as ever in ours his lyre) --, sent - (Once) -- many - (ere <the> flame received him from <the> sea) -- <a> soul - (THALASSIUS Upon <the> flowery forefront of <the> year) --
Illustrious - (One wandering by <the> grey) -- into - (green April sea Found on <a> reach of shingle and shallower sand Inlaid with starrier glimmering jewellery Left for <the> sun's love and <the> light wind's cheer Along <the> foam) -- Ades - (flowered strand Breeze) -- premature - (brightened) --,
And Heroes - (something nearer sea than land Though <the> last shoreward blossom) -- gave - (fringe was near) -- (so stood - (<A> babe asleep with flower) -- <the> will - (soft face that gleamed To sun and seaward as it laughed and dreamed) -- of Jove - (Too sure of either love for either's fear) --)5
To dogs - (Albeit so birdlike slight and light) -- and to all - (it seemed Nor man nor mortal child of man) -- ravening - (but fair As even its twin) -- fowls - (but fair As even its twin) -- <a> prey - (flowers were) --,
When fierce - (That <the> wind scatters like <an> Oread's hair) -- dispute - (For when July strewed fire on earth and sea <The> last time ere that year) -- had separated - (Out of <the> flame of morn Cymothoe Beheld one brighter than <the> sunbright sphere Move toward her from its fieriest heart) -- once - (whence trod <The> live sun's very God) --
<The> noble - (Across <the> foam) -- Chief - (bright water) -- Achilles from <the> son - (ways that are As heavenlier heavens with star for answering star) --
Of Atreus - (And on her eyes and hair and maiden mouth Felt <a> kiss falling fierier than <the> South And heard above afar <A> noise of songs and wind) --, Agamemnon - (enamoured wings And lutes and lyres of milder and mightier strings) --, King - (And round <the> resonant radiance of his car Where depth is one with height) -- of men - (Light heard as music) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17347/17347-h/17347-h.htm ,    
Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650

SONNETS

HOPE AND FEAR
Beneath the shadow of dawn's aerial cope, With eyes enkindled as the sun's own sphere, Hope from the front of youth in godlike cheer Looks Godward, past the shades where blind men grope Round the dark door that prayers nor dreams can ope, And makes for joy the very darkness dear That gives her wide wings play; nor dreams that fear At noon may rise and pierce the heart of hope. Then, when the soul leaves off to dream and yearn, May truth first purge her eyesight to discern What once being known leaves time no power to appal; Till youth at last, ere yet youth be not, learn The kind wise word that falls from years that fall— "Hope thou not much, and fear thou not at all."

AFTER SUNSET
"Si quis piorum Manibus locus."

I

Straight from the sun's grave in the deep clear west A sweet strong wind blows, glad of life: and I, Under the soft keen stardawn whence the sky Takes life renewed, and all night's godlike breast Palpitates, gradually revealed at rest By growth and change of ardours felt on high, Make onward, till the last flame fall and die And all the world by night's broad hand lie blest. Haply, meseems, as from that edge of death, Whereon the day lies dark, a brightening breath Blows more of benediction than the morn, So from the graves whereon grief gazing saith That half our heart of life there lies forlorn May light or breath at least of hope be born.

II

The wind was soft before the sunset fled: Now, while the cloud-enshrouded corpse of day Is lowered along a red funereal way Down to the dark that knows not white from red, A clear sheer breeze against the night makes head, Serene, but sure of life as ere a ray Springs, or the dusk of dawn knows red from grey, Being as a soul that knows not quick from dead. From far beyond the sunset, far above, Full toward the starry soundless east it blows Bright as a child's breath breathing on a rose, Smooth to the sense as plume of any dove; Till more and more as darkness grows and glows Silence and night seem likest life and love.

III

If light of life outlive the set of sun That men call death and end of all things, then How should not that which life held best for men And proved most precious, ~ ~


"Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"Taken from Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles Swinburne, Vol V"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Sonnets, and Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets 1590-1650"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp              Iliad




1.
SONNETS                            (B/C2 + ook/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                          Book

2.                HOPE AND FEAR Beneath <the> shadow of dawn's aerial cope

"HOPE AND FEAR Beneath shadow of dawn's aerial cope"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                "I/One"

3.              With eyes enkindled as <the> sun's own sphere

"With eyes enkindled as sun's own sphere"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp               Achilles

4.                 Hope from <the> front of youth in godlike cheer Looks Godward

"Hope from front of youth in godlike cheer Looks Godward"                (s/C2 + ing/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 sing

5.   past <the> shades where blind men grope Round <the> dark door that prayers nor dreams can ope

"past shades where blind men grope Round dark door that prayers nor dreams can ope"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (SONNETS) -- I/One - (HOPE AND FEAR Beneath <the> shadow of dawn's aerial cope) --.

Achilles - (With eyes enkindled as <the> sun's own sphere) -- sing - (Hope from <the> front of youth in godlike cheer Looks Godward) --, O - (past <the> shades where blind men grope Round <the> dark door that prayers nor dreams can ope) -- Goddess! - (And makes for joy <the> very darkness dear That gives her wide wings play) -- Peleus' - (nor dreams that fear At noon may rise and pierce <the> heart of hope) -- son - (Then) --;
His wrath - (when <the> soul leaves off to dream and yearn) -- pernicious - (May truth first purge her eyesight to discern What once being known leaves time no power to appal) --, who ten - (Till youth at last) -- thousand - (ere yet youth be not) -- woes - (learn <The> kind wise word that falls from years that fall) --
Caused - (Hope thou not much) -- to Achaia's - (and fear thou not at all) -- host - (AFTER SUNSET) --, sent - (Si quis piorum Manibus locus) -- many - (I Straight from <the> sun's grave in <the> deep clear west <A> sweet strong wind blows) -- <a> soul - (glad of life) --
Illustrious - (and I) -- into - (Under <the> soft keen stardawn whence <the> sky Takes life renewed) -- Ades - (and all night's godlike breast Palpitates) -- premature - (gradually revealed at rest By growth and change of ardours felt on high) --,
And Heroes - (Make onward) -- gave - (till <the> last flame fall and die And all <the> world by night's broad hand lie blest) -- (so stood - (Haply) -- <the> will - (meseems) -- of Jove - (as from that edge of death) --)5
To dogs - (Whereon <the> day lies dark) -- and to all - (<a> brightening breath Blows more of benediction than <the> morn) -- ravening - (So from <the> graves whereon grief gazing saith That half our heart of life there lies forlorn May light or breath at least of hope be born) -- fowls - (I I <The> wind was soft before <the> sunset fled) -- <a> prey - (Now) --,
When fierce - (while <the> cloud) -- dispute - (enshrouded corpse of day Is lowered along <a> red funereal way Down to <the> dark that knows not white from red) -- had separated - (<A> clear sheer breeze against <the> night makes head) -- once - (Serene) --
<The> noble - (but sure of life as ere <a> ray Springs) -- Chief - (or <the> dusk of dawn knows red from grey) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Being as <a> soul that knows not quick from dead) --
Of Atreus - (From far beyond <the> sunset) --, Agamemnon - (far above) --, King - (Full toward <the> starry soundless east it blows Bright as <a> child's breath breathing on <a> rose) -- of men - (Smooth to the sense as plume of any dove) --.

Who them - (Till more and more as darkness grows and glows Silence and night seem likest life and love) -- to strife - (III/Three If light of life outlive <the> set of sun That men call death and end of all things) -- impell'd - (then How should not that which life held best for men And proved most precious) --?

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Studies in Song"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16973/16973-h/16973-h.htm ,    
Studies in Song

SONG FOR THE CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR
Born January 30th, 1775
Died September 17th, 1864

There is delight in singing, though none hear Beside the singer: and there is delight In praising, though the praiser sit alone And see the praised far off him, far above.
Landor.

DEDICATION.
TO MRS. LYNN LINTON.
Daughter in spirit elect and consecrate By love and reverence of the Olympian sire Whom I too loved and worshipped, seeing so great, And found so gracious toward my long desire To bid that love in song before his gate Sound, and my lute be loyal to his lyre, To none save one it now may dedicate Song's new burnt-offering on a century's pyre. And though the gift be light As ashes in men's sight, Left by the flame of no ethereal fire, Yet, for his worthier sake Than words are worthless, take This wreath of words ere yet their hour expire: So, haply, from some heaven above, He, seeing, may set next yours my sacrifice of love.

May 24, 1880.

SONG FOR THE CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR.

1.

Five years beyond an hundred years have seen Their winters, white as faith's and age's hue, Melt, smiling through brief tears that broke between, And hope's young conquering colours reared anew, Since, on the day whose edge for kings made keen Smote sharper once than ever storm-wind blew, A head predestined for the girdling green That laughs at lightning all the seasons through, Nor frost or change can sunder Its crown untouched of thunder Leaf from least leaf of all its leaves that grew Alone for brows too bold For storm to sear of old, Elect to shine in time's eternal view, ~ ~

"Studies in Song"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Studies in Song"                        ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/+bp                         Iliad


1.             SONG FOR <THE> CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR Born January 30th

"SONG FOR CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR Born January 30th"                (B/C2 + ook/T)/+bp                Book

2.
"1775 Died September 17th"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/T)/+bp                 "I/One"

3.
"1864"                            ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/T)/+bp                          Achilles

4.
"There is delight in singing"                          (s/C2 + ing/T)/+bp                        sing

5.                 though none hear Beside <the> singer

"though none hear Beside singer"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/T)/+bp                   O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (SONG FOR <THE> CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR Born January 30th) -- I/One - (1775 Died September 17th) --.

Achilles - (1864) -- sing - (There is delight in singing) --, O - (though none hear Beside <the> singer) -- Goddess! - (and there is delight In praising) -- Peleus' - (though <the> praiser sit alone And see <the> praised far off him) -- son - (far above) --;
His wrath - (Landor) -- pernicious - (DEDICATION) --, who ten - (TO M R S) -- thousand - (LYNN LINTON) -- woes - (Daughter in spirit elect and consecrate By love and reverence of <the> Olympian sire Whom I too loved and worshipped) --
Caused - (seeing so great) -- to Achaia's - (And found so gracious toward my long desire To bid that love in song before his gate Sound) -- host - (and my lute be loyal to his lyre) --, sent - (To none save one it now may dedicate Song's new burnt) -- many - (offering on <a> century's pyre) -- <a> soul - (And though <the> gift be light As ashes in men's sight) --
Illustrious - (Left by <the> flame of no ethereal fire) -- into - (Yet) -- Ades - (for his worthier sake Than words are worthless) -- premature - (take This wreath of words ere yet their hour expire) --,
And Heroes - (So) -- gave - (haply) -- (so stood - (from some heaven above) -- <the> will - (He) -- of Jove - (seeing) --)5
To dogs - (may set next yours my sacrifice of love) -- and to all - (May 24) -- ravening - (1880) -- fowls - (SONG FOR <THE> CENTENARY OF WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR) -- <a> prey - (1/One) --,
When fierce - (Five years beyond <an> hundred years have seen Their winters) -- dispute - (white as faith's and age's hue) -- had separated - (Melt) -- once - (smiling through brief tears that broke between) --
<The> noble - (And hope's young conquering colours reared anew) -- Chief - (Since) -- Achilles from <the> son - (on <the> day whose edge for kings made keen Smote sharper once than ever storm) --
Of Atreus - (wind blew) --, Agamemnon - (<A> head predestined for <the> girdling green That laughs at lightning all <the> seasons through) --, King - (Nor frost or change can sunder Its crown untouched of thunder Leaf from least leaf of all its leaves that grew Alone for brows too bold For storm to sear of old) -- of men - (Elect to shine in time's eternal view) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Studies in Song, A Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, The Heptalogia, Etc."      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18782/18782-h/18782-h.htm ,  
Studies in Song, A Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, The Heptalogia, Etc.

STUDIES IN SONG: A CENTURY OF ROUNDELS: SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS: THE HEPTALOGIA: ETC.

ATHENS: AN ODE

ATHENS
AN ODE
Ere from under earth again like fire the violet kindle, Ere the holy buds and hoar on olive-branches bloom, Ere the crescent of the last pale month of winter dwindle, Shrink, and fall as falls a dead leaf on the dead month's tomb, Round the hills whose heights the first-born olive-blossom brightened, Round the city brow-bound once with violets like a bride, Up from under earth again a light that long since lightened Breaks, whence all the world took comfort as all time takes pride. Pride have all men in their fathers that were free before them, In the warriors that begat us free-born pride have we: But the fathers of their spirits, how may men adore them, With what rapture may we praise, who bade our souls be free? Sons of Athens born in spirit and truth are all born free men; Most of all, we, nurtured where the north wind holds his reign: Children all we sea-folk of the Salaminian seamen, Sons of them that beat back Persia they that beat back Spain. Since the songs of Greece fell silent, none like ours have risen; Since the sails of Greece fell slack, no ships have sailed like ours; How should we lament not, if her spirit sit in prison? How should we rejoice not, if her wreaths renew their flowers? All the world is sweeter, if the Athenian violet quicken: ~ ~


"Studies in Song, Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, Heptalogia, Etc."                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"
"From Swinburne's Poems Volume V"                (Sw/C1 + "-inburne's work"/T)/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Studies in Song, Century of Roundels, Sonnets on English Dramatic Poets, Heptalogia, Etc."              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/+cp                Iliad


1.
"STUDIES IN SONG"                            (B/C2 + ook/T)/+cp                           Book

2.                   <A> CENTURY OF ROUNDELS

"CENTURY OF ROUNDELS"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/T)/+cp                  "I/One"

3.
"SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS"              ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/T)/+cp                Achilles

4.               <THE> HEPTALOGIA

HEPTALOGIA                                    (s/C2 + ing/T)/+cp                             sing

5.
"ETC"                                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/T)/+cp                              O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (STUDIES IN SONG) -- I/One - (<A> CENTURY OF ROUNDELS) --.

Achilles - (SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS) -- sing - (<THE> HEPTALOGIA) --, O - (ETC) -- Goddess! - (ATHENS) -- Peleus' - (<AN> ODE) -- son - (ATHENS <AN> ODE Ere from under earth again like fire <the> violet kindle) --;
His wrath - (Ere <the> holy buds and hoar on olive) -- pernicious - (branches bloom) --, who ten - (Ere <the> crescent of <the> last pale month of winter dwindle) -- thousand - (Shrink) -- woes - (and fall as falls <a> dead leaf on <the> dead month's tomb) --
Caused - (Round <the> hills whose heights <the> first) -- to Achaia's - (born olive) -- host - (blossom brightened) --, sent - (Round <the> city brow) -- many - (bound once with violets like <a> bride) -- <a> soul - (Up from under earth again <a> light that long since lightened Breaks) --
Illustrious - (whence all <the> world took comfort as all time takes pride) -- into - (Pride have all men in their fathers that were free before them) -- Ades - (In <the> warriors that begat us free) -- premature - (born pride have we) --,
And Heroes - (But <the> fathers of their spirits) -- gave - (how may men adore them) -- (so stood - (With what rapture may we praise) -- <the> will - (who bade our souls be free) -- of Jove - (Sons of Athens born in spirit and truth are all born free men) --)5
To dogs - (Most of all) -- and to all - (we) -- ravening - (nurtured where <the> north wind holds his reign) -- fowls - (Children all we sea) -- <a> prey - (folk of <the> Salaminian seamen) --,
When fierce - (Sons of them that beat back Persia they that beat back Spain) -- dispute - (Since <the> songs of Greece fell silent) -- had separated - (none like ours have risen) -- once - (Since the sails of Greece fell slack) --
<The> noble - (no ships have sailed like ours) -- Chief - (How should we lament not) -- Achilles from <the> son - (if her spirit sit in prison) --
Of Atreus - (How should we rejoice not) --, Agamemnon - (if her wreaths renew their flowers) --, King - (All <the> world is sweeter) -- of men - (if <the> Athenian violet quicken) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "A Study of Shakespeare"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16412/16412-h/16412-h.htm ,    
A Study of Shakespeare

A STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE.

I.

The greatest poet of our age has drawn a parallel of elaborate eloquence between Shakespeare and the sea; and the likeness holds good in many points of less significance than those which have been set down by the master-hand.  For two hundred years at least have students of every kind put forth in every sort of boat on a longer or a shorter voyage of research across the waters of that unsounded sea.  From the paltriest fishing-craft to such majestic galleys as were steered by Coleridge and by Goethe, each division of the fleet has done or has essayed its turn of work; some busied in dredging alongshore, some taking surveys of this or that gulf or headland, some putting forth through shine and shadow into the darkness of the great deep.  Nor does it seem as if there would sooner be an end to men’s labour on this than on the other sea.  But here a difference is perceptible.  The material ocean has been so far mastered by the wisdom and the heroism of man that we may look for a time to come when the mystery shall be manifest of its furthest north and south, and men resolve the secret of the uttermost parts of the sea: the poles also may find their Columbus.  But the limits of that other ocean, the laws of its tides, the motive of its forces, the mystery of its unity and the secret of its change, no seafarer of us all may ever think thoroughly to know.  No wind-gauge will help us to the science of its storms, no lead-line sound for us the depth of its divine and terrible serenity.

As, however, each generation for some two centuries now or more has witnessed fresh attempts at pilotage and fresh expeditions of discovery undertaken in the seas of Shakespeare, it may be well to study a little the laws of navigation in such waters as these, and look well to compass and rudder before we accept the guidance of a strange helmsman or make proffer for trial of our own.  There are shoals and quicksands on which many a seafarer has run his craft aground in time past, and others of more special peril to adventurers of the present day.  The chances of shipwreck vary in a certain degree with each new change of vessel and each fresh muster of hands.  At one time a main rock of offence on which the stoutest ships of discovery were wont to split was the narrow and slippery reef of verbal emendation; and upon this our native pilots were too many of them prone to steer.  Others fell becalmed offshore in a German fog of philosophic theories, and would not be persuaded that the house of words they had built in honour of Shakespeare was “dark as hell,” seeing “it had bay-windows transparent as barricadoes, and the clear-stories towards the south- ~ ~


"Study of Shakespeare"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"

"Study of Shakespeare"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/Ch/+bp                   Iliad


1.                   <A> STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE

"STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE"                      (B/C2 + ook/T)/Ch/+bp                      Book

2.
"I"                             ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/T)/Ch/+bp                             "I/One"

3. <The> greatest poet of our age has drawn <a> parallel of elaborate eloquence between Shakespeare and <the> sea

"greatest poet of our age has drawn parallel of elaborate eloquence between Shakespeare and sea"              ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/T)/Ch/+bp               Achilles

4. and <the> likeness holds good in many points of less significance than those which have been set down by <the> master

"and likeness holds good in many points of less significance than those which have been set down by master"              (s/C2 + ing/T)/Ch/+bp              sing

5.
hand                                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/T)/Ch/+bp                                O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (<A> STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE) -- I/One - (I) --.

Achilles - (<The> greatest poet of our age has drawn <a> parallel of elaborate eloquence between Shakespeare and <the> sea) -- sing - (and <the> likeness holds good in many points of less significance than those which have been set down by <the> master) --, O - (hand) -- Goddess! - (For two hundred years at least have students of every kind put forth in every sort of boat on <a> longer or <a> shorter voyage of research across <the> waters of that unsounded sea) -- Peleus' - (From <the> paltriest fishing) -- son - (craft to such majestic galleys as were steered by Coleridge and by Goethe) --;
His wrath - (each division of <the> fleet has done or has essayed its turn of work) -- pernicious - (some busied in dredging alongshore) --, who ten - (some taking surveys of this or that gulf or headland) -- thousand - (some putting forth through shine and shadow into <the> darkness of <the> great deep) -- woes - (Nor does it seem as if there would sooner be <an> end to men’s labour on this than on <the> other sea) --
Caused - (But here <a> difference is perceptible) -- to Achaia's - (<The> material ocean has been so far mastered by <the> wisdom and <the> heroism of man that we may look for <a> time to come when <the> mystery shall be manifest of its furthest north and south) -- host - (and men resolve <the> secret of <the> uttermost parts of <the> sea) --, sent - (<the> poles also may find their Columbus) -- many - (But <the> limits of that other ocean) -- <a> soul - (<the> laws of its tides) --
Illustrious - (<the> motive of its forces) -- into - (<the> mystery of its unity and <the> secret of its change) -- Ades - (no seafarer of us all may ever think thoroughly to know) -- premature - (No wind) --,
And Heroes - (gauge will help us to <the> science of its storms) -- gave - (no lead) -- (so stood - (line sound for us <the> depth of its divine and terrible serenity) -- <the> will - (As) -- of Jove - (however) --)5
To dogs - (each generation for some two centuries now or more has witnessed fresh attempts at pilotage and fresh expeditions of discovery undertaken in <the> seas of Shakespeare) -- and to all - (it may be well to study <a> little <the> laws of navigation in such waters as these) -- ravening - (and look well to compass and rudder before we accept <the> guidance of <a> strange helmsman or make proffer for trial of our own) -- fowls - (There are shoals and quicksands on which many <a> seafarer has run his craft aground in time past) -- <a> prey - (and others of more special peril to adventurers of <the> present day) --,
When fierce - (<The> chances of shipwreck vary in <a> certain degree with each new change of vessel and each fresh muster of hands) -- dispute - (At one time <a> main rock of offence on which <the> stoutest ships of discovery were wont to split was the narrow and slippery reef of verbal emendation) -- had separated - (and upon this our native pilots were too many of them prone to steer) -- once - (Others fell becalmed offshore in <a> German fog of philosophic theories) --
<The> noble - (and would not be persuaded that <the> house of words they had built in honour of Shakespeare was) -- Chief - (dark as hell) -- Achilles from <the> son - (seeing) --
Of Atreus - (it had bay) --, Agamemnon - (windows transparent as barricadoes) --, King - (and <the> clear) -- of men - (stories towards <the> south) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "The Tale of Balen"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2136/2136-h/2136-h.htm ,  
The Tale of Balen

DEDICATION
TO MY MOTHER

Love that holds life and death in fee,
Deep as the clear unsounded sea
And sweet as life or death can be,
Lays here my hope, my heart, and me
Before you, silent, in a song.
Since the old wild tale, made new, found grace,
When half sung through, before your face,
It needs must live a springtide space,
While April suns grow strong.

March 24, 1896.

THE TALE OF BALEN

I

In hawthorn-time the heart grows light,
The world is sweet in sound and sight,
Glad thoughts and birds take flower and flight,
The heather kindles toward the light,
   The whin is frankincense and flame.
And be it for strife or be it for love
The falcon quickens as the dove
When earth is touched from heaven above
   With joy that knows no name.

And glad in spirit and sad in soul
With dream and doubt of days that roll
As waves that race and find no goal
Rode on by bush and brake and bole
   A northern child of earth and sea.
The pride of life before him lay
Radiant: the heavens of night and day
Shone less than shone before his way
   His ways and days to be.

And all his life of blood and breath
Sang out within him: time and death
Were even as words a dreamer saith
When sleep within him slackeneth,
   And light and life and spring were one.
The steed between his knees that sprang,
The moors and woods that shone and sang,
The hours where through the spring’s breath rang,
   Seemed ageless as the sun.

But alway through the bounteous bloom
That earth gives thanks if heaven illume
His soul forefelt a shadow of doom,
His heart foreknew a gloomier gloom
   Than closes all men’s equal ways,
Albeit the spirit of life’s light spring
With pride of heart upheld him, king
And lord of hours like snakes that sting
   And nights that darken days.

And as the strong spring round him grew
Stronger, and all blithe winds that blew
Blither, and flowers that flowered anew
More glad of sun and air and dew,
   The shadow lightened on his soul
And brightened into death and died
Like winter, as the bloom waxed wide
From woodside on to riverside
   And southward goal to goal.

Along the wandering ways of Tyne,
By beech and birch and thorn that shine
And laugh when life’s requickening wine
Makes night and noon and dawn divine
   And stirs in all the veins of spring, ~ ~


"Tale of Balen"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/T)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"Tale of Balen"                         ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/T)/Ch/+cp                        Iliad


1.
"DEDICATION TO MY MOTHER Love that holds life and death in fee"                      (B/C2 + ook/T)/Ch/+cp                      Book

2.            Deep as <the> clear unsounded sea And sweet as life or death can be

"Deep as clear unsounded sea And sweet as life or death can be"              ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/T)/Ch/+cp               "I/One"

3.
"Lays here my hope"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/T)/Ch/+cp                   Achilles

4.
"my heart"                              (s/C2 + ing/T)/Ch/+cp                                 sing

5.
"and me Before you"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/T)/Ch/+cp                       O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (DEDICATION TO MY MOTHER Love that holds life and death in fee) -- I/One - (Deep as <the> clear unsounded sea And sweet as life or death can be) --.

Achilles - (Lays here my hope) -- sing - (my heart) --, O - (and me Before you) -- Goddess! - (silent) -- Peleus' - (in <a> song) -- son - (Since <the> old wild tale) --;
His wrath - (made new) -- pernicious - (found grace) --, who ten - (When half sung through) -- thousand - (before your face) -- woes - (It needs must live <a> springtide space) --
Caused - (While April suns grow strong) -- to Achaia's - (March 24) -- host - (1896) --, sent - (<THE> TALE OF BALEN I In hawthorn) -- many - (time <the> heart grows light) -- <a> soul - (<The> world is sweet in sound and sight) --
Illustrious - (Glad thoughts and birds take flower and flight) -- into - (<The> heather kindles toward <the> light) -- Ades - (<The> whin is frankincense and flame) -- premature - (And be it for strife or be it for love <The> falcon quickens as <the> dove When earth is touched from heaven above With joy that knows no name) --,
And Heroes - (And glad in spirit and sad in soul With dream and doubt of days that roll As waves that race and find no goal Rode on by bush and brake and bole <A> northern child of earth and sea) -- gave - (<The> pride of life before him lay Radiant) -- (so stood - (<the> heavens of night and day Shone less than shone before his way His ways and days to be) -- <the> will - (And all his life of blood and breath Sang out within him) -- of Jove - (time and death Were even as words <a> dreamer saith When sleep within him slackeneth) --)5
To dogs - (And light and life and spring were one) -- and to all - (<The> steed between his knees that sprang) -- ravening - (<The> moors and woods that shone and sang) -- fowls - (<The> hours where through <the> spring’s breath rang) -- <a> prey - (Seemed ageless as <the> sun) --,
When fierce - (But alway through <the> bounteous bloom That earth gives thanks if heaven illume His soul forefelt <a> shadow of doom) -- dispute - (His heart foreknew <a> gloomier gloom Than closes all men’s equal ways) -- had separated - (Albeit <the> spirit of life’s light spring With pride of heart upheld him) -- once - (king And lord of hours like snakes that sting And nights that darken days) --
<The> noble - (And as <the> strong spring round him grew Stronger) -- Chief - (and all blithe winds that blew Blither) -- Achilles from <the> son - (and flowers that flowered anew More glad of sun and air and dew) --
Of Atreus - (<The> shadow lightened on his soul And brightened into death and died Like winter) --, Agamemnon - (as <the> bloom waxed wide From woodside on to riverside And southward goal to goal) --, King - (Along <the> wandering ways of Tyne) -- of men - (By beech and birch and thorn that shine And laugh when life’s requickening wine Makes night and noon and dawn divine And stirs in all <the> veins of spring) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "Two Nations"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/8127/pg8127.html ,    
Two Nations

SONGS OF TWO NATIONS

CONTENTS
A SONG OF ITALY
ODE ON THE PROCLAMATION OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC


DIRAE

I saw the double-featured statue stand
  Of Memnon or of Janus, half with night
Veiled, and fast bound with iron; half with light
  Crowned, holding all men's future in his hand.

And all the old westward face of time grown grey
  Was writ with cursing and inscribed for death;
But on the face that met the mornings breath
  Fear died of hope as darkness dies of day.


A SONG OF ITALY

Inscribed

With All Devotion and Reverence

To:
JOSEPH MAZZINI

1867

Upon a windy night of stars that fell
  At the wind's spoken spell,
Swept with sharp strokes of agonizing light
  From the clear gulf of night,
Between the fixed and fallen glories one
  Against my vision shone,
More fair and fearful and divine than they
  That measure night and day,
And worthier worship; and within mine eyes
  The formless folded skies
Took shape and were unfolded like as flowers.
  And I beheld the hours
As maidens, and the days as labouring men,
  And the soft nights again
As wearied women to their own souls wed,
  And ages as the dead.
And over these living, and them that died,
  From one to the other side
A lordlier light than comes of earth or air
  Made the world's future fair.
A woman like to love in face, but not
  A thing of transient lot—
And like to hope, but having hold on truth—
  And like to joy or youth,
Save that upon the rock her feet were set—
  And like what men forget,
Faith, innocence, high thought, laborious peace—
  And yet like none of these,
Being not as these are mortal, but with eyes
  That sounded the deep skies
And clove like wings or arrows their clear way
  Through night and dawn and day—
So fair a presence over star and sun
  Stood, making these as one.
For in the shadow of her shape were all
  Darkened and held in thrall,
So mightier rose she past them; and I felt
  Whose form, whose likeness knelt
With covered hair and face and clasped her knees;
  And knew the first of these
Was Freedom, ~ ~


"Two Nations"                  (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)                   "Swinburne's work"

"Two Nations"                          ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad /P)                                Iliad


1.
"SONGS OF TWO NATIONS"                          (B/C2 + ook/P)                           Book

2. CONTENTS <A> SONG OF ITALY ODE ON <THE> PROCLAMATION OF <THE> FRENCH REPUBLIC DIRAE I saw <the> double

"CONTENTS SONG OF ITALY ODE ON PROCLAMATION OF FRENCH REPUBLIC DIRAE I saw double"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/P)                 "I/One"

3.
"featured statue stand Of Memnon or of Janus"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/P)                  Achilles

4.
"half with night Veiled"                             (s/C2 + ing/P)                               sing

5.
"and fast bound with iron"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/P)                          O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (SONGS OF TWO NATIONS) -- I/One - (CONTENTS <A> SONG OF ITALY ODE ON <THE> PROCLAMATION OF <THE> FRENCH REPUBLIC DIRAE I saw <the> double) --.

Achilles - (featured statue stand Of Memnon or of Janus) -- sing - (half with night Veiled) --, O - (and fast bound with iron) -- Goddess! - (half with light Crowned) -- Peleus' - (holding all men's future in his hand) -- son - (And all <the> old westward face of time grown grey Was writ with cursing and inscribed for death) --;
His wrath - (But on <the> face that met <the> mornings breath Fear died of hope as darkness dies of day) -- pernicious - (<A> SONG OF ITALY Inscribed With All Devotion and Reverence To) --, who ten - (JOSEPH MAZZINI 1867 Upon <a> windy night of stars that fell At <the> wind's spoken spell) -- thousand - (Swept with sharp strokes of agonizing light From <the> clear gulf of night) -- woes - (Between <the> fixed and fallen glories one Against my vision shone) --
Caused - (More fair and fearful and divine than they That measure night and day) -- to Achaia's - (And worthier worship) -- host - (and within mine eyes <The> formless folded skies Took shape and were unfolded like as flowers) --, sent - (And I beheld <the> hours As maidens) -- many - (and <the> days as labouring men) -- <a> soul - (And <the> soft nights again As wearied women to their own souls wed) --
Illustrious - (And ages as <the> dead) -- into - (And over these living) -- Ades - (and them that died) -- premature - (From one to <the> other side <A> lordlier light than comes of earth or air Made <the> world's future fair) --,
And Heroes - (<A> woman like to love in face) -- gave - (but not <A> thing of transient lot) -- (so stood - (And like to hope) -- <the> will - (but having hold on truth) -- of Jove - (And like to joy or youth) --)5
To dogs - (Save that upon <the> rock her feet were set) -- and to all - (And like what men forget) -- ravening - (Faith) -- fowls - (innocence) -- <a> prey - (high thought) --,
When fierce - (laborious peace) -- dispute - (And yet like none of these) -- had separated - (Being not as these are mortal) -- once - (but with eyes That sounded <the> deep skies And clove like wings or arrows their clear way Through night and dawn and day) --
<The> noble - (So fair <a> presence over star and sun Stood) -- Chief - (making these as one) -- Achilles from <the> son - (For in <the> shadow of her shape were all Darkened and held in thrall) --
Of Atreus - (So mightier rose she past them) --, Agamemnon - (and I felt Whose form) --, King - (whose likeness knelt With covered hair and face and clasped her knees) -- of men - (And knew <the> first of these Was Freedom) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between   Swinburne's  "William Blake"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/35995/35995-h/35995-h.htm ,  
William Blake

William Blake
A Critical Essay

Going to and fro in the Earth.

DEDICATION.

To WILLIAM MICHAEL ROSSETTI.

There are many reasons which should make me glad to inscribe your name upon the forefront of this book. To you, among other debts, I owe this one—that it is not even more inadequate to the matter undertaken; and to you I need not say that it is not designed to supplant or to compete with the excellent biography of Blake already existing. Rather it was intended to serve as complement or supplement to this. How it grew, idly and gradually, out of a mere review into its present shape and volume, you know. To me at least the subject before long seemed too expansive for an article; and in the leisure of months, and in the intervals of my natural work, the first slight study became little by little an elaborate essay. I found so much unsaid, so much unseen, that a question soon rose before me of simple alternatives: to do nothing, or to do much. I chose the latter; and you, who have done more than I to serve and to exalt the memory of Blake, must know better how much remains undone.

Friendship needs no cement of reciprocal praise; and this book, dedicated to you from the first, and owing to your guidance as much as to my goodwill whatever it may have of worth, wants no extraneous allusion to explain why it should rather be inscribed with your name than with another. Nevertheless, I will say that now of all times it gives me pleasure to offer you such a token of friendship as I have at hand to give. I can but bring you brass for the gold you send me; but between equals and friends there can be no question of barter. Like Diomed, I take what I am given and offer what I have. Such as it is, I know you will accept it with more allowance than it deserves; but one thing you will not overrate—the affectionate admiration, the grateful remembrance, which needs no public expression on the part of your friend

A. C. SWINBURNE.

November, 1866.

WILLIAM BLAKE.

Tous les grands poëtes deviennent naturellement, fatalement, critiques. ~ ~


"William Blake"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)/Ch/+bp               "Swinburne's work"
"Critical Essay"                (Sw/C2 + "-inburne's work"/P)/Ch/+cp               "Swinburne's work"

"William Blake"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/P)/Ch/+bp                            Iliad


1.
"William Blake"                              (B/C2 + ook/P)/Ch/+bp                           Book

2.                <A> Critical Essay

"Critical Essay"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + One/P)/Ch/+bp                       "I/One"

3.                Going to and fro in <the> Earth.

"Going to and fro in Earth"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Achilles/P)/Ch/+bp                  Achilles

4.
DEDICATION                               (s/C2 + ing/P)/Ch/+bp                             sing

5.
"To WILLIAM MICHAEL ROSSETTI"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + O/P)/Ch/+bp                 O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (William Blake) -- I/One - (<A> Critical Essay) --.

Achilles - (Going to and fro in <the> Earth) -- sing - (DEDICATION) --, O - (To WILLIAM MICHAEL ROSSETTI) -- Goddess! - (There are many reasons which should make me glad to inscribe your name upon <the> forefront of this book) -- Peleus' - (To you) -- son - (among other debts) --;
His wrath - (I owe this one) -- pernicious - (that it is not even more inadequate to <the> matter undertaken) --, who ten - (and to you I need not say that it is not designed to supplant or to compete with <the> excellent biography of Blake already existing) -- thousand - (Rather it was intended to serve as complement or supplement to this) -- woes - (How it grew) --
Caused - (idly and gradually) -- to Achaia's - (out of <a> mere review into its present shape and volume) -- host - (you know) --, sent - (To me at least the subject before long seemed too expansive for <an> article) -- many - (and in <the> leisure of months) -- <a> soul - (and in <the> intervals of my natural work) --
Illustrious - (<the> first slight study became little by little <an> elaborate essay) -- into - (I found so much unsaid) -- Ades - (so much unseen) -- premature - (that <a> question soon rose before me of simple alternatives) --,
And Heroes - (to do nothing) -- gave - (or to do much) -- (so stood - (I chose <the> latter) -- <the> will - (and you) -- of Jove - (who have done more than I to serve and to exalt <the> memory of Blake) --)5
To dogs - (must know better how much remains undone) -- and to all - (Friendship needs no cement of reciprocal praise) -- ravening - (and this book) -- fowls - (dedicated to you from <the> first) -- <a> prey - (and owing to your guidance as much as to my goodwill whatever it may have of worth) --,
When fierce - (wants no extraneous allusion to explain why it should rather be inscribed with your name than with another) -- dispute - (Nevertheless) -- had separated - (I will say that now of all times it gives me pleasure to offer you such <a> token of friendship as I have at hand to give) -- once - (I can but bring you brass for <the> gold you send me) --
<The> noble - (but between equals and friends there can be no question of barter) -- Chief - (Like Diomed) -- Achilles from <the> son - (I take what I am given and offer what I have) --
Of Atreus - (Such as it is) --, Agamemnon - (I know you will accept it with more allowance than it deserves) --, King - (but one thing you will not overrate) -- of men - (<the> affectionate admiration) --.

Who them - (<the> grateful remembrance) -- to strife - (which needs no public expression on <the> part of your friend A) -- impell'd - (C) --? What power - (SWINBURNE) -- divine - (November) --?
Latona's son - (1866) -- and Jove's - (WILLIAM BLAKE) --.[1] For he - (Tous les grands poëtes deviennent naturellement) --, incensed - (fatalement) --
Against <the> King - (critiques) --,

Et cetera.



Christina Rossetti
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Christina+Rossetti ,  

"Christina Rossetti"                        (Sw/T + inburne/C2)                          Swinburne

*          "Christina Rossetti"  >>  "Christina Georgina Rossetti" /P

>>              5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894

"1830"                     (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/+bp                   "Christina Rossetti"
December                   (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/+cp                  "Christina Rossetti"
"5"                          (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/Ch                    "Christina Rossetti"

"1894"                     (Ch/P + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/+bp                    "Christina Rossetti"
December                  (Ch/P + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/+cp                    "Christina Rossetti"
"29"                         (Ch/P + "-ristina Rossetti"/T)/Ch                    "Christina Rossetti"

>>     Their father, Gabriele Rossetti, was an Italian poet and a refugee from Naples; their mother, Frances Polidori, was the sister of Lord Byron's friend and physician, John William Polidori, author of The Vampyre.

"Gabriele Rossetti"                (Chr/T + "-istina Rossetti's father"/P)                 "Christina Rossetti's father"
"Frances Polidori"                (Chr/T + "-istina Rossetti's mother"/P)                 "Christina Rossetti's mother"

*           "Frances Polidori"  >>  "John William Polidori" /C2  >>  sister /C2/Ch

"author of Vampyre"                (J/C2 + "-ohn William Polidori"/S)                 "John William Polidori"
"Byron's friend and physician"                (J/C2 + "-ohn William Polidori"/S)/Ch                 "John William Polidori"

>>             engaged to the painter James Collinson,

* "Christina Rossetti"  >>  "Christina Georgina Rossetti" /P  >>  "James Collinson" /T/Ch

>>            involved with the linguist Charles Cayley,

"Charles Cayley"                  (J/T + "-ames Collinson"/C2)                   "James Collinson"
linguist                      (J/T + "-ames Collinson"/C2)/Ch                     "James Collinson"


>>               Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems

"Goblin Market"                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)                "Christina Rossetti's writing"
"Prince's Progress"                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)/Ch                "Christina Rossetti's writing"

"Goblin Market"                               ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/P)                           Iliad

>>                  Poems

Poems                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)/Ch                "Christina Rossetti's writing"

Poems                                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/P)/Ch                               Iliad



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between     Christina Rossetti's  "Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/16950/pg16950.html ,    
Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems

To
  MY MOTHER
  In all reverence and love
  I inscribe this book

GOBLIN MARKET, AND OTHER POEMS, 1862

GOBLIN MARKET

Morning and evening
Maids heard the goblins cry:
'Come buy our orchard fruits,
Come buy, come buy:
Apples and quinces,
Lemons and oranges,
Plump unpecked cherries,
Melons and raspberries,
Bloom-down-cheeked peaches,
Swart-headed mulberries, 10
Wild free-born cranberries,
Crab-apples, dewberries,
Pine-apples, blackberries,
Apricots, strawberries;—
All ripe together
In summer weather,—
Morns that pass by,
Fair eves that fly;
Come buy, come buy:
Our grapes fresh from the vine, 20
Pomegranates full and fine,
Dates and sharp bullaces,
Rare pears and greengages,
Damsons and bilberries,
Taste them and try:
Currants and gooseberries,
Bright-fire-like barberries,
Figs to fill your mouth,
Citrons from the South, ~ ~


"Goblin Market"                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)                "Christina Rossetti's writing"
"Prince's Progress"                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)/+cp/Ch                "Christina Rossetti's writing"
"and Other Poems"                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)/+bp/Ch                "Christina Rossetti's writing"

"Goblin Market"                               ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/P)                           Iliad


1.
"To  MY MOTHER  In all reverence and love  I inscribe this book"                (B/S + ook/P)                Book

2.
"GOBLIN MARKET"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/P)                         "I/One"

3.
"AND OTHER POEMS"                       ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/P)                       Achilles

4.
"1862"                                         (s/C2 + ing/P)                                   sing

5.                   GOBLIN MARKET Morning and evening Maids heard the goblins cry

"GOBLIN MARKET Morning and evening Maids heard the goblins cry"               ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/P)                O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (To  MY MOTHER  In all reverence and love  I inscribe this book) -- I/One - (GOBLIN MARKET) --.

Achilles - (AND OTHER POEMS) -- sing - (1862) --, O - (GOBLIN MARKET Morning and evening Maids heard the goblins cry) -- Goddess! - (Come buy our orchard fruits) -- Peleus' - (Come buy) -- son - (come buy) --;
His wrath - (Apples and quinces) -- pernicious - (Lemons and oranges) --, who ten - (Plump unpecked cherries) -- thousand - (Melons and raspberries) -- woes - (Bloom) --
Caused - (down) -- to Achaia's - (cheeked peaches) -- host - (Swart) --, sent - (headed mulberries) -- many - (Wild free) -- <a> soul - (born cranberries) --
Illustrious - (Crab) -- into - (apples) -- Ades - (dewberries) -- premature - (Pine) --,
And Heroes - (apples) -- gave - (blackberries) -- (so stood - (Apricots) -- <the> will - (strawberries) -- of Jove - (All ripe together In summer weather) --)5
To dogs - (Morns that pass by) -- and to all - (Fair eves that fly) -- ravening - (Come buy) -- fowls - (come buy) -- <a> prey - (Our grapes fresh from <the> vine) --,
When fierce - (Pomegranates full and fine) -- dispute - (Dates and sharp bullaces) -- had separated - (Rare pears and greengages) -- once - (Damsons and bilberries) --
<The> noble - (Taste them and try) -- Chief - (Currants and gooseberries) -- Achilles from <the> son - (Bright) --
Of Atreus - (fire) --, Agamemnon - (like barberries) --, King - (Figs to fill your mouth) -- of men - (Citrons from <the> South) --.

Et cetera.



>>        Phonetic correspondence   between     Christina Rossetti's  "Poems"      and   Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19188/19188-h/19188-h.htm ,    
Poems

Golden head by golden bead

TO MY MOTHER,
IN ALL REVERENCE AND LOVE,
I INSCRIBE THIS BOOK.

THE AUTHOR TO HER AMERICAN READERS.

My little book seems scarcely to admit of prefatory
words: either it will speak for itself, or all my additions
must fail to speak for it.

Its reappearance, however, in an American edition,
gives me a welcome opportunity of acknowledging the
courtesy and liberality of Messrs. Roberts Brothers, who
have arranged with me and with my kind friend and
publisher, Mr. Macmillan, to bring it before the American
public.

CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI.
London.

Buy from us with a golden curl.

GOBLIN MARKET.

Morning and evening
Maids heard the goblins cry:
"Come buy our orchard fruits,
Come buy, come buy:
Apples and quinces,
Lemons and oranges,
Plump unpecked cherries,
Melons and raspberries,
Bloom-down-cheeked peaches,
Swart-headed mulberries,
Wild free-born cranberries,
Crab-apples, dewberries,
Pine-apples, blackberries,
Apricots, strawberries;--
All ripe together
In summer weather,--
Morns that pass by,
Fair eves that fly;
Come buy, ~ ~


Poems                (Ch/S + "-ristina Rossetti's writing"/P)/Ch                "Christina Rossetti's writing"

Poems                                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + Iliad/P)/Ch                               Iliad



1.
"Golden head by golden bead"                        (B/S + ook/P)/Ch                        Book

2.
"TO MY MOTHER"                          ([ŋ=  w=]/S + One/P)/Ch                       "I/One"

3.
"IN ALL REVERENCE AND LOVE"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Achilles/P)/Ch                  Achilles

4.
"I INSCRIBE THIS BOOK"                            (s/C2 + ing/P)/Ch                         sing

5.                       <THE> AUTHOR TO HER AMERICAN READERS

"AUTHOR TO HER AMERICAN READERS"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + O/P)/Ch                  O

Et cetera     as below.


Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK - (My little book seems scarcely to admit of prefatory words) -- I/One - (either it will speak for itself) --.

Achilles - (or all my additions must fail to speak for it) -- sing - (Its reappearance) --, O - (however) -- Goddess! - (in <an> American edition) -- Peleus' - (gives me <a> welcome opportunity of acknowledging <the> courtesy and liberality of Messrs) -- son - (Roberts Brothers) --;
His wrath - (who have arranged with me and with my kind friend and publisher) -- pernicious - (M r) --, who ten - (Macmillan) -- thousand - (to bring it before <the> American public) -- woes - (CHRISTINA G) --
Caused - (ROSSETTI) -- to Achaia's - (London) -- host - (Buy from us with <a> golden curl) --, sent - (GOBLIN MARKET) -- many - (Morning and evening Maids heard <the> goblins cry) -- <a> soul - (Come buy our orchard fruits) --
Illustrious - (Come buy) -- into - (come buy) -- Ades - (Apples and quinces) -- premature - (Lemons and oranges) --,
And Heroes - (Plump unpecked cherries) -- gave - (Melons and raspberries) -- (so stood - (Bloom) -- <the> will - (down) -- of Jove - (cheeked peaches) --)5
To dogs - (Swart) -- and to all - (headed mulberries) -- ravening - (Wild free) -- fowls - (born cranberries) -- <a> prey - (Crab) --,
When fierce - (apples) -- dispute - (dewberries) -- had separated - (Pine) -- once - (apples) --
<The> noble - (blackberries) -- Chief - (Apricots) -- Achilles from <the> son - (strawberries) --
Of Atreus - (All ripe together In summer weather) --, Agamemnon - (Morns that pass by) --, King - (Fair eves that fly) -- of men - (Come buy) --.

Et cetera.



The Vampyre
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/The+Vampyre ,  

Vampyre                            (M/GC/S/abT + oralia/P)/+bp                           Moralia


"Frances Polidori"                (Chr/T + "-istina Rossetti's mother"/P)                 "Christina Rossetti's mother"

*           "Frances Polidori"  >>  "John William Polidori" /C2  >>  sister /C2/Ch

"author of Vampyre"                (J/C2 + "-ohn William Polidori"/S)                 "John William Polidori"

>>      "The Vampyre" was first published on 1 April 1819 by Henry Colburn in the New Monthly Magazine with the false attribution "A Tale by Lord Byron". The name of the work's protagonist, "Lord Ruthven",

"Henry Colburn"                (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn William Polidori"/S)                 "John William Polidorir"

"Tale by Lord Byron"                    (V/C1 + ampyre/S)/+cp/Ch                       Vampyre
"Lord Ruthven"                        (V/C1 + ampyre/S)/+bp/Ch                        Vampyre

* "Tale by Lord Byron"  >>  "New Monthly Magazine" /C2  >>  "1819" /C2/Ch  >>  April /GC/S/abT  >>  1 /GC/S/abT/Ch

Characters
•    Lord Ruthven - a suave British nobleman, the vampire
•    Aubrey — a young gentleman, an orphan
•    Ianthe — a beautiful Greek woman Aubrey meets on his journeys with Ruthven.
•    Aubrey's sister — who becomes engaged to the Earl of Marsden
•    Earl of Marsden — who is also Lord Ruthven

*     "Lord Ruthven"  >>  Aubrey /P  >>  Ianthe /P/Ch



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Vampyre   and  Plutarch's  "Moralia"

http://www.attalus.org/info/moralia.html ,  
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Plutarch/Moralia/De_liberis_educandis*.html ,  
Plutarch : Moralia
On the education of children   -   De liberis educandis

1 Let us consider what may be said of the education of free-born children, and what advantages they should enjoy to give them a sound character when they grow up.

2 It is perhaps better to begin with their parentage first; and I should advise those desirous of becoming fathers of notable offspring bto abstain from random cohabitation with women; I mean with such women as courtesans and concubines. For those who are not well-born, whether on the father's or the mother's side, have an indelible disgrace in their low birth, which accompanies them throughout their lives, and offers to anyone desiring to use it a ready subject of reproach and insult. Wise was the poet who declares:

The home's foundation being wrongly laid,

The offspring needs must be unfortunate.1
 
A goodly treasure, then, is honourable birth, and such a man may speak his mind freely, a thing which should be held of the highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten. cIn the nature of things, the spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled, and quite rightly does the poet declare:

p7 A man, though bold, is made a slave whene'er

He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6087/6087-h/6087-h.htm ,  
The Vampyre

A Tale.

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM GENEVA.

"I breathe freely in the neighbourhood of this lake; the ground upon which I tread has been subdued from the earliest ages; the principal objects which immediately strike my eye, bring to my recollection scenes, in which man acted the hero and was the chief object of interest. Not to look back to earlier times of battles and sieges, here is the bust of Rousseau—here is a house with an inscription denoting that the Genevan philosopher first drew breath under its roof. A little out of the town is Ferney, the residence of Voltaire; where that wonderful, though certainly in many respects contemptible, character, received, like the hermits of old, the visits of pilgrims, not only from his own nation, but from the farthest boundaries of Europe. Here too is Bonnet's abode, and, a few steps beyond, the house of that astonishing woman Madame de Stael: perhaps the first of her sex, who has really proved its often claimed equality with, the nobler man. We have before had women who have written interesting- ~ ~


Vampyre                            (M/GC/S/abT + oralia/P)/+bp                           Moralia


1.               On <the> education of children --- <A> Tale

Tale                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "On education of children"/P)/+bp                 "On education of children"

2.                EXTRACT OF <A> LETTER FROM GENEVA

"EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM GENEVA"                 (c/GC/S/abT + "-olumn one"/P)/+bp                 "1. column one"

3. Let us consider what may be said of <the> education of free-born children --- I breathe freely in <the> neighbourhood of this lake

"I breathe freely in neighbourhood of this lake"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-et us consider what may be said of education of free-born children"/P)/+bp                 "Let us consider what may be said of education of free-born children"

4. and what advantages they should enjoy to give them <a> sound character when they grow up --- <the> ground upon which I tread has been subdued from <the> earliest ages

"ground upon which I tread has been subdued from earliest ages"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and what advantages they should enjoy to give them sound character when they grow up"/P)/+bp                 "and what advantages they should enjoy to give them sound character when they grow up"

5.           <the> principal objects which immediately strike my eye

"principal objects which immediately strike my eye"              (c/GC/S/abT + "-olumn two"/P)/+bp              "2. column two"

6.
"bring to my recollection scenes"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "It is perhaps better to begin with their parentage first"/P)/+bp                 "It is perhaps better to begin with their parentage first"

7.               in which man acted <the> hero and was <the> chief object of interest

"in which man acted hero and was chief object of interest"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and I should advise those desirous of becoming fathers of notable offspring bto abstain from random cohabitation with women"/P)/+bp                 "and I should advise those desirous of becoming fathers of notable offspring bto abstain from random cohabitation with women"

8.
"Not to look back to earlier times of battles and sieges"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "I mean with such women as courtesans and concubines"/P)/+bp                 "I mean with such women as courtesans and concubines"

9.                here is <the> bust of Rousseau

"here is bust of Rousseau"                 (F/GC/S/abT + "-or those who are not well-born"/P)/+bp                 "For those who are not well-born"

10. whether on <the> father's or <the> mother's side --- here is <a> house with <an> inscription denoting that <the> Genevan philosopher first drew breath under its roof

"here is house with inscription denoting that Genevan philosopher first drew breath under its roof"                 (wh/GC/S/abT + "-ether on father's or mother's side"/P)/+bp                 "whether on father's or mother's side"

11.        have <an> indelible disgrace in their low birth --- <A> little out of <the> town is Ferney

"little out of town is Ferney"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-ave indelible disgrace in their low birth"/P)/+bp                 "have indelible disgrace in their low birth"

12.                  <the> residence of Voltaire

"residence of Voltaire"                 (wh/GC/S/abT + "-ich accompanies them throughout their lives"/P)/+bp                 "which accompanies them throughout their lives"

13.             and offers to anyone desiring to use it <a> ready subject of reproach and insult

"where that wonderful"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and offers to anyone desiring to use it ready subject of reproach and insult"/P)/+bp                  "and offers to anyone desiring to use it ready subject of reproach and insult"

14.              Wise was <the> poet who declares

"though certainly in many respects contemptible"                (W/GC/S/abT + "-ise was poet who declares"/P)/+bp                "Wise was poet who declares"

15.              <The> home's foundation being wrongly laid

character                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-ome's foundation being wrongly laid"/P)/+bp                 "home's foundation being wrongly laid"

16.                 <The> offspring needs must be unfortunate

received                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "offspring needs must be unfortunate"/P)/+bp                 "offspring needs must be unfortunate"

17.              <A> goodly treasure --- like <the> hermits of old, <the> visits of pilgrims

"like hermits of old, visits of pilgrims"                 (g/GC/S/abT + "-oodly treasure"/P)/+bp                 "goodly treasure"

18.
"not only from his own nation"                    (th/GC/S/abT + en/P)/+bp                   then

19.                  but from <the> farthest boundaries of Europe

"but from farthest boundaries of Europe"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "is honourable birth"/P)/+bp                 "is honourable birth"

20.             and such <a> man may speak his mind freely

"Here too is Bonnet's abode"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and such man may speak his mind freely"/P)/+bp                 "and such man may speak his mind freely"

21. <a> thing which should be held of <the> highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten

and                  (th/GC/S/abT + "-ing which should be held of highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten"/P)/+bp                 "thing which should be held of highest account by those who wish to have issue lawfully begotten"

22.                  In <the> nature of things --- <a> few steps beyond

"few steps beyond"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "In nature of things"/P)/+bp                 "In nature of things"

23. <the> spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled --- <the> house of that astonishing woman Madame de Stael

"house of that astonishing woman Madame de Stael"                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-pirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled"/P)/+bp                 "spirits of those whose blood is base or counterfeit are constantly being brought down and humbled"

24.             and quite rightly does <the> poet declare --- perhaps <the> first of her sex

"perhaps first of her sex"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and quite rightly does poet declare"/P)/+bp                 "and quite rightly does poet declare"

25.                        <A> man

"who has really proved its often claimed equality with"                 (m/GC/S/abT + an/P)/+bp                 man

26.                    <the> nobler man

"nobler man"                  (th/GC/S/abT + "-ough bold"/P)/+bp                   "though bold"

27.                  is made <a> slave whene'er He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace

"We have before had women who have written interesting"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "is made slave whene'er He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace"/P)/+bp                 "is made slave whene'er He learns his mother's or his sire's disgrace"

Et cetera.

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DATE: 2011.09.01 - 13:48


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