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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | brd2 | Kor | book | FUN member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, main :::


596 12 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   Edmund Spenser, Franz Liszt,  Victor Hugo, Alphonse de Lamartine, Heinrich Heine,  Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels

Georg Friedrich Handel
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Georg+Friedrich+Handel ,  
* "Johannes Brahms"  >>  ("Clara Schumann" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Joseph Joachim" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Arnold Schoenberg" /P/Ch)/S  >>  ("Edward Elgar" /C2/Ch)/S  >>  ("Franz Liszt" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Richard Wagner" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Chopin" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Mendelssohn" /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Handel" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT


Giacomo Leopardi
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Giacomo+Leopardi ,  
"Giacomo Leopardi"                (T/T + "-orquato Tasso"/C2)/+bp/Ch               "Torquato Tasso"


Lully
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Jean-Baptiste+Lully ,  
Lully                     (T/T + "-orquato Tasso"/C2)/+cp/Ch                      "Torquato Tasso"


Alessandro Scarlatti
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Alessandro+Scarlatti ,  
"Alessandro Scarlatti"                (T/T + "-orquato Tasso"/P)/+bp/Ch               "Torquato Tasso"


Christoph Willibald Gluck
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Christoph+Willibald+Gluck ,    
"Christoph Willibald Gluck"                (T/T + "-orquato Tasso"/P)               "Torquato Tasso"



Edmund Spenser
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Edmund+Spenser ,  

"Edmund Spenser"                (T/T + "-orquato Tasso"/P)/+cp/Ch               "Torquato Tasso"

*              "Edmund Spenser"  >>  Spenser /P

Born                          c.1552                            London, England
Died               13 January 1599 (aged 46–47)               London, England

"c.1552"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser"/P)                  "Edmund Spenser"
"London, England"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser"/P)/Ch                    "Edmund Spenser"

"1599"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Edmund Spenser"/P)/+bp                 "Edmund Spenser"
January                ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Edmund Spenser"/P)/+cp                 "Edmund Spenser"
"13"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Edmund Spenser"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Edmund Spenser"
"London, England"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Edmund Spenser"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Edmund Spenser"

>>     Spenser was called a Poet's Poet and was admired by William Wordsworth, John Keats, Lord Byron and Alfred Lord Tennyson, among others.

*              "Edmund Spenser"  >>  Spenser /P  >>  ("Poet's Poet" /T/Ch)/P

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a2264 ,  
•  The Faerie Queene — Volume 01 (English) (as Author)
•  The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 (English) (as Author)
•  Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I (English) (as Author)

"Faerie Queene"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Edmund Spenser's work"/C2)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Volume 0 1"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Edmund Spenser's work"/C2)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Faerie Queene"                            ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)                            Iliad

"Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/P)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Volume 5"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/P)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/P)                  Iliad

"Spenser's Faerie Queene"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/S)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Book I"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/S)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Spenser's Faerie Queene"                        ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)                      Iliad



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Edmund Spenser's  "The Faerie Queene"    and Homer's Iliad

Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK I.

Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus' son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia's host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)5
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.

Who them to strife impell'd? What power divine?10
Latona's son and Jove's.[1] For he, incensed
004 Against the King, a foul contagion raised
In all the host, and multitudes destroy'd,
For that the son of Atreus had his priest
Dishonored, Chryses. To the fleet he came15
Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem
His daughter, and his hands charged with the wreath
And golden sceptre[2] of the God shaft-arm'd. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/6930/pg6930.txt ,  
Faerie Queene

Disposed into twelue bookes,
Fashioning- XII. Morall vertues.

TO
THE MOST HIGH,
MIGHTIE
And
MAGNIFICENT
EMPRESSE RENOW-
MED FOR PIETIE, VER-
TVE, AND ALL GRATIOVS
GOVERNMENT ELIZABETH BY
THE GRACE OF GOD QVEENE
OF ENGLAND FRAVNCE AND
IRELAND AND OF VIRGI-
NIA, DEFENDOVR OF THE
FAITH, &c. HER MOST
HVMBLE SERVAVNT
EDMVND SPENSER
DOTH IN ALL HV-
MILITIE DEDI-
CATE, PRE-
SENT
AND CONSECRATE THESE
HIS LABOVRS TO LIVE
WITH THE ETERNI-
TIE OF HER
FAME.

A
Letter of the Authors expounding his
_whole intention in the course of this worke: which_
for that it giueth great light to the Reader, for
the better vnderstanding is hereunto
annexed.

_To the Right noble, and Valorous, Sir Walter_
Raleigh knight, Lo. Wardein of the Stanneryes, and
her Maiesties l ~ ~


"Faerie Queene"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Edmund Spenser's work"/C2)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Volume 0 1"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Edmund Spenser's work"/C2)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"

"Faerie Queene"                            ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/C2)                            Iliad


1.
"Disposed into twelue bookes"                   (B/P + "-ook one"/C2)                  "Book one"

2.
Fashioning                     ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Achilles sing"/C2)                     "Achilles sing"

3.
"X I I"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "O Goddess"/C2)                        "O Goddess"

4.
"Morall vertues"                        (P/P + "-eleus' son"/C2)                        "Peleus' son"

5.                     TO <THE> MOST HIGH

"TO MOST HIGH"                 (H/P + "-is wrath pernicious"/C2)                 "His wrath pernicious"

6.
"MIGHTIE And MAGNIFICENT EMPRESSE RENOW"                 (wh/P + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/C2)                 "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

7.
"MED FOR PIETIE"                 (s/P + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/C2)                 "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

8.
"V E R"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "And Heroes gave"/C2)                 "And Heroes gave"

9.             (so stood <the> will of Jove)

"T V E"                 (s/P + "-o stood will of Jove"/C2)                 "so stood will of Jove"

10. To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey --- AND ALL GRATIOVS GOVERNMENT ELIZABETH BY <THE> GRACE OF GOD QVEENE OF ENGLAND FRAVNCE AND IRELAND AND OF VIRGI

"AND ALL GRATIOVS GOVERNMENT ELIZABETH BY GRACE OF GOD QVEENE OF ENGLAND FRAVNCE AND IRELAND AND OF VIRGI"                 (T/P + "-o dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/C2)                 "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

11.   When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus

"N I A"                 (Wh/P + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/C2)                 "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

12.                 DEFENDOVR OF <THE> FAITH

"DEFENDOVR OF FAITH"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Agamemnon/C2)                 Agamemnon

13.
"&c (N C)"                 (K/P + "-ing of men"/C2)                 "King of men"

14.
"HER MOST HVMBLE SERVAVNT EDMVND SPENSER DOTH IN ALL HV"                 (Wh/P + "-o them to strife impell'd"/C2)                 "Who them to strife impell'd"

15.
"MILITIE DEDI"                 (Wh/P + "-at power divine"/C2)                 "What power divine"

16.
"C A T E"                 (L/P + "-atona's son and Jove's"/C2)                 "Latona's son and Jove's"

17.
"P R E"                                  (F/P + "-or he"/C2)                                "For he"

18. incensed Against <the> King --- SENT AND CONSECRATE THESE HIS LABOVRS TO LIVE WITH <THE> ETERNI

"SENT AND CONSECRATE THESE HIS LABOVRS TO LIVE WITH ETERNI"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "incensed Against King"/C2)                 "incensed Against King"

19.                  <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host

"TIE OF HER FAME"                 (f/P + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/C2)                 "foul contagion raised In all host"

20.                 <A> Letter of <the> Authors expounding his

"Letter of Authors expounding his"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and multitudes destroy'd"/C2)                 "and multitudes destroy'd"

21. For that <the> son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored --- whole intention in <the> course of this worke

"whole intention in course of this worke"                 (F/P + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/C2)                 "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

22.
which                                   (Chrys/P + es/C2)                                Chryses

23. To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter --- for that it giueth great light to <the> Reader

"for that it giueth great light to Reader"                 (T/P + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/C2)                 "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"

24. and his hands charged with <the> wreath And golden sceptre of <the> God shaft --- for <the> better vnderstanding is hereunto annexed

"for better v n derstanding is hereunto annexed"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"/C2)                 "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"

25.                To <the> Right noble

"To Right noble"                          ([ŋ=  w=]/P + arm'd/C2)                           arm'd

26.             His supplication was at large to all <The> host of Greece

"and Valorous"                 (H/P + "-is supplication was at large to all host of Greece"/C2)                 "His supplication was at large to all host of Greece"

27.
"Sir Walter"                 (b/P + "-ut most of all to two"/C2)                 "but most of all to two"

28.                <The> sons of Atreus

"Raleigh knight"                    (s/P + "-ons of Atreus"/C2)                    "sons of Atreus"

29.              
Lo                      (h/P + "-ighest in command"/C2)                     "highest in command"

30.                    Wardein of <the> Stanneryes

"Wardein of Stanneryes"                 (Y/P + "-e gallant Chiefs"/C2)                 "Ye gallant Chiefs"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Edmund Spenser's  "The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"    and Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/10602/pg10602.html ,  
The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser

M.DCCC.LX.

MISCELLANIES.
COMPLAINTS.
CONTAINING SUNDRIE SMALL POEMES OF THE WORLDS VANITIE:
WHEREOF THE NEXT PAGE MAKETH MENTION.
BY ED. SP.

THE PRINTER TO THE GENTLE READER.

Since my late setting foorth of the Faerie Queene, finding that it hath found a favourable passage amongst you, I have sithence endevoured by all good meanes, (for the better encrease and accomplishment of your delights,) to get into my handes such smale poemes of the same Authors as I heard were disperst abroad in sundrie hands, and not easie to bee come by by himselfe; some of them having bene diverslie imbeziled and purloyned from him, since his departure over sea. Of the which I have by good meanes gathered togeather these fewe parcels present, which I have caused to bee imprinted altogeather, for that they al seeme to containe like matter of argument in them, being all complaints and meditations of the worlds vanitie, verie grave and profitable. To which effect I understand that he besides wrote sundrie others, namelie: Ecclesiastes and Canticum Canticorum translated, A Senights Slumber, The Hell of Lovers, his Purgatorie, being all dedicated to ladies, ~ ~


"Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/P)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Volume 5"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/P)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"

"Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/P)                  Iliad


1.
M                                   (B/C2 + "-ook one"/P)                               "Book one"

2.
"D C C C"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Achilles sing"/P)                     "Achilles sing"

3.
"L X"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "O Goddess"/P)                        "O Goddess"

4.
MISCELLANIES                         (P/C2 + "-eleus' son"/P)                        "Peleus' son"

5.
COMPLAINTS                 (H/C2 + "-is wrath pernicious"/P)                 "His wrath pernicious"

6.                  CONTAINING SUNDRIE SMALL POEMES OF <THE> WORLDS VANITIE

"CONTAINING SUNDRIE SMALL POEMES OF WORLDS VANITIE"                 (wh/C2 + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/P)                 "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

7.                    WHEREOF <THE> NEXT PAGE MAKETH MENTION

"WHEREOF NEXT PAGE MAKETH MENTION"                 (s/C2 + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/P)                 "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

8.
"BY ED"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And Heroes gave"/P)                 "And Heroes gave"

9.             (so stood <the> will of Jove)

"S P"                    (s/C2 + "-o stood will of Jove"/P)                    "so stood will of Jove"

10.     To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey --- <THE> PRINTER TO <THE> GENTLE READER

"PRINTER TO GENTLE READER"                 (T/C2 + "-o dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/P)                 "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

11. When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus --- Since my late setting foorth of <the> Faerie Queene

"Since my late setting foorth of Faerie Queene"                 (Wh/C2 + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/P)                 "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

12.            finding that it hath found <a> favourable passage amongst you

"finding that it hath found favourable passage amongst you"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Agamemnon/P)                 Agamemnon

13.
"I have sithence endevoured by all good meanes"                 (K/C2 + "-ing of men"/P)                 "King of men"

14.               for <the> better encrease and accomplishment of your delights

"for better encrease and accomplishment of your delights"                 (Wh/C2 + "-o them to strife impell'd"/P)                 "Who them to strife impell'd"

15. to get into my handes such smale poemes of <the> same Authors as I heard were disperst abroad in sundrie hands

"to get into my handes such smale poemes of same Authors as I heard were disperst abroad in sundrie hands"                 (Wh/C2 + "-at power divine"/P)                 "What power divine"

16.
"and not easie to bee come by by himselfe"                 (L/C2 + "-atona's son and Jove's"/P)                 "Latona's son and Jove's"

17.
"some of them having bene diverslie imbeziled and purloyned from him"                 (F/C2 + "-or he"/P)                 "For he"

18.                          incensed Against <the> King

"since his departure over sea"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "incensed Against King"/P)                 "incensed Against King"

19. <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host --- Of <the> which I have by good meanes gathered togeather these fewe parcels present

"Of which I have by good meanes gathered togeather these fewe parcels present"                 (f/C2 + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/P)                 "foul contagion raised In all host"

20.
"which I have caused to bee imprinted altogeather"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and multitudes destroy'd"/P)                 "and multitudes destroy'd"

21.              For that <the> son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored

"for that they al seeme to containe like matter of argument in them"                 (F/C2 + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/P)                 "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

22.            being all complaints and meditations of <the> worlds vanitie

"being all complaints and meditations of worlds vanitie"               (Chry/C2 + ses/P)              Chryses

23.            To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter

"verie grave and profitable"                 (T/C2 + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/P)                 "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"

24.        and his hands charged with <the> wreath And golden sceptre of <the> God shaft

"To which effect I understand that he besides wrote sundrie others"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"/P)                 "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"

25.
namelie                              ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + arm'd/P)                              arm'd

26.             His supplication was at large to all <The> host of Greece

"Ecclesiastes and Canticum Canticorum translated"                 (H/C2 + "-is supplication was at large to all host of Greece"/P)                 "His supplication was at large to all host of Greece"

27.               <A> Senights Slumber

"Senights Slumber"                 (b/C2 + "-ut most of all to two"/P)                 "but most of all to two"

28.                <The> sons of Atreus --- <The> Hell of Lovers

"Hell of Lovers"                     (s/C2 + "-ons of Atreus"/P)                     "sons of Atreus"

29.              
"his Purgatorie"                   (h/C2 + "-ighest in command"/P)                   "highest in command"

30.
"being all dedicated to ladies"                 (Y/C2 + "-e gallant Chiefs"/P)                 "Ye gallant Chiefs"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Edmund Spenser's  "The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser"    and Homer's Iliad

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15272/15272-h/15272-h.htm ,    
Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser

LETTER TO SIR WALTER RALEIGH

A LETTER of the Authors expounding his whole intention in the course of this worke; which, for that it giveth great light to the reader, for the better understanding is hereunto annexed.

TO THE RIGHT NOBLE AND VALOROUS
SIR WALTER RALEIGH, KNIGHT.

Lo: Wardein of the Stanneries, and her majesties lieutenaunt of the countie of Cornewayll.

SIR,

Knowing how doubtfully all Allegories may be constructed, and this booke of mine, which I have entituled The Faery Queene, being a continued Allegorie, or darke conceit, I have thought good, as well for avoyding of jealous opinions and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading thereof, (being so, by you commanded) to discover unto you the generall intention and meaning, which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned, without expressing of any particular purposes, or by-accidents therein occasioned. The generall end therefore of all the booke, is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline. Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, beeing coloured with an historicall fiction, ~ ~


"Spenser's Faerie Queene"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/S)                 "Edmund Spenser's work"
"Book I"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Edmund Spenser's work"/S)/Ch                 "Edmund Spenser's work"

"Spenser's Faerie Queene"                        ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + Iliad/S)                      Iliad


1.
"LETTER TO SIR WALTER RALEIGH"                     (B/C2 + "-ook one"/S)                   "Book one"

2.        <A> LETTER of <the> Authors expounding his whole intention in <the> course of this worke

"LETTER of Authors expounding his whole intention in course of this worke"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Achilles sing"/S)                 "Achilles sing"

3.
which                          ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "O Goddess"/S)                        "O Goddess"

4.                    for that it giveth great light to <the> reader

"for that it giveth great light to reader"               (P/C2 + "-eleus' son"/S)                 "Peleus' son"

5.                   for <the> better understanding is hereunto annexed

"for better understanding is hereunto annexed"                 (H/C2 + "-is wrath pernicious"/S)                 "His wrath pernicious"

6.                TO <THE> RIGHT NOBLE AND VALOROUS SIR WALTER RALEIGH

"TO RIGHT NOBLE AND VALOROUS SIR WALTER RALEIGH"                 (wh/C2 + "-o ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"/S)                 "who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"

7.
KNIGHT                 (s/C2 + "-ent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"/S)                 "sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"

8.
Lo                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And Heroes gave"/S)                    "And Heroes gave"

9.             (so stood <the> will of Jove) --- Wardein of <the> Stanneries

"Wardein of Stanneries"                    (s/C2 + "-o stood will of Jove"/S)                    "so stood will of Jove"

10. To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey --- and her majesties lieutenaunt of <the> countie of Cornewayll

"and her majesties lieutenaunt of countie of Cornewayll"                 (T/C2 + "-o dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"/S)                 "To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"

11.   When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus

"S I R"                 (Wh/C2 + "-en fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"/S)                 "When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"

12.
"Knowing how doubtfully all Allegories may be constructed"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Agamemnon/S)                 Agamemnon

13.
"and this booke of mine"                  (K/C2 + "-ing of men"/S)                  "King of men"

14.                  which I have entituled <The> Faery Queene

"which I have entituled Faery Queene"                 (Wh/C2 + "-o them to strife impell'd"/S)                 "Who them to strife impell'd"

15.                     being <a> continued Allegorie

"being continued Allegorie"                 (Wh/C2 + "-at power divine"/S)                 "What power divine"

16.
"or darke conceit"                 (L/C2 + "-atona's son and Jove's"/S)                 "Latona's son and Jove's"

17.
"I have thought good"                          (F/C2 + "-or he"/S)                         "For he"

18.                          incensed Against <the> King

"as well for avoyding of jealous opinions and misconstructions"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "incensed Against King"/S)                 "incensed Against King"

19.                    <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host

"as also for your better light in reading thereof"                 (f/C2 + "-oul contagion raised In all host"/S)                 "foul contagion raised In all host"

20.
"being so"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and multitudes destroy'd"/S)                 "and multitudes destroy'd"

21.              For that <the> son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored

"by you commanded"                 (F/C2 + "-or that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"/S)                 "For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"

22.               to discover unto you <the> generall intention and meaning

"to discover unto you generall intention and meaning"               (Chrys/C2 + es/S)              Chryses

23. To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter --- which in <the> whole course thereof I have fashioned

"which in whole course thereof I have fashioned"                 (T/C2 + "-o fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"/S)                 "To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"

24.        and his hands charged with <the> wreath And golden sceptre of <the> God shaft

"without expressing of any particular purposes"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"/S)                 "and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft-arm'd"

25.
"or by"                               ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + arm'd/S)                              arm'd

26.             His supplication was at large to all <The> host of Greece

"accidents therein occasioned"                 (H/C2 + "-is supplication was at large to all host of Greece"/S)                 "His supplication was at large to all host of Greece"

27.               <The> generall end therefore of all <the> booke

"generall end therefore of all booke"                 (b/C2 + "-ut most of all to two"/S)                 "but most of all to two"

28. <The> sons of Atreus --- is to fashion <a> gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline

"is to fashion gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline"                     (s/C2 + "-ons of Atreus"/S)                     "sons of Atreus"

29.              
"Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing"                   (h/C2 + "-ighest in command"/S)                   "highest in command"

30.                    beeing coloured with <an> historicall fiction

"beeing coloured with historicall fiction"                 (Y/C2 + "-e gallant Chiefs"/S)                 "Ye gallant Chiefs"

Et cetera.



Gaetano Donizetti
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Gaetano+Donizetti ,  
"Gaetano Donizetti"                (T/P + "-orquato Tasso"/T)               "Torquato Tasso"



Franz Liszt
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Franz+Liszt ,  

"Franz Liszt"                (T/P + "-orquato Tasso"/T)/+cp/Ch               "Torquato Tasso"

>>     The native form of this personal name is Liszt Ferenc. This article uses the Western name order.
>>     Franz Liszt (Hungarian: Ferencz Liszt, in modern use Ferenc Liszt,[note 1] from 1859 to 1867 officially Franz Ritter von Liszt)[note 2] (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886)

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  Liszt /P/Ch  >>  "Ferenc Liszt" /C1/Ch  >>  "Ferencz Liszt" /C2/Ch  >>  "Franz Ritter von Liszt" /S/Ch  >>  "Liszt Ferenc" /GC/S/abT/Ch

*            "Franz Ritter von Liszt"  >>  ("1859" /P)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("1867" /T)/GC/S/abT

"1811"                               (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/C2)/+bp                       "Franz Liszt"
October                              (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/C2)/+cp                       "Franz Liszt"
"22"                             (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/C2)/Ch/+bp                       "Franz Liszt"

"1886"                               (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/S)/+bp                        "Franz Liszt"
July                                  (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/S)/+cp                        "Franz Liszt"
"31"                              (Fr/T + "anz Liszt"/S)/Ch/+bp                        "Franz Liszt"

>>               a 19th century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist and teacher.

*              "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("virtuoso pianist" /C1)/T

>>               Hector Berlioz, Camille Saint-Saëns

*            "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2

>>               Victor Hugo, Alphonse de Lamartine and Heinrich Heine

* Aristophanes  >>  ("Victor Hugo" /P/Ch)/S  >>  ("Alphonse de Lamartine" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Heinrich Heine" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S

>>                    Niccolò Paganini

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P

>>            Sigismond Thalberg and Alexander Dreyschock

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P

>>                     Frédéric Chopin

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P

>>              relationship with the Countess Marie d'Agoult.

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>               Touring virtuoso

*         "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("virtuoso pianist" /C1)/T  >>  ("Touring virtuoso" /C1)/GC/S/abT

>>                Hans von Bülow

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>  Haydn's "Die Schöpfung" and works by J. S. Bach, Beethoven, Jommelli, Mendelssohn and Palestrina

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S

>>                 Carl Czerny

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2

>>                 Hummel

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T

>>                 Schubert's Erlkönig (in Liszt's transcription)

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Schubert /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T

>>               Weber's Invitation to the Dance,

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Weber /S/Ch)/T

>>                      Ignaz Moscheles

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Weber /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Ignaz Moscheles" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T

>>                      Ferdinand Hiller

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Weber /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Ignaz Moscheles" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T  >>  (Hiller /P/Ch)/T

>>                      Beethoven

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Weber /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Ignaz Moscheles" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T  >>  (Hiller /P/Ch)/T  >>  (Beethoven /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P

>>              Bellini and Donizetti

Bellini                                     (L/S + iszt/P)                                       Liszt
Donizetti                                  (L/P + iszt/S)                                       Liszt

>>        not invented by Verdi and Gounod, but by Liszt. Hans von Bülow

* "Franz Liszt"  >>  ("Hector Berlioz" /S/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Camille Saint-Saëns" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2  >>  ("Niccolò Paganini" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("Sigismond Thalberg" /T/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Alexander Dreyschock" /S/Ch)/P  >>  ("Frédéric Chopin" /C2/Ch)/P  >>  ("Marie d'Agoult" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Hans von Bülow" /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Joseph Haydn" /P/Ch)/C2  >>  (Bach /T/Ch)/S  >>  (Jommelli /P/Ch)/S  >>  (Mendelssohn /C2/Ch)/S  >>  (Palestrina /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  ("Carl Czerny" /T/Ch)/C2  >>  (Hummel /C2/Ch)/T  >>  (Weber /S/Ch)/T  >>  ("Ignaz Moscheles" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/T  >>  (Hiller /P/Ch)/T  >>  (Beethoven /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P  >>  (Verdi /S/Ch)/GC/S/abT

Gounod                                  (L/P + iszt/C2)                                       Liszt

>>                                Nikolaus Lenau

"Nikolaus Lenau"                              (L/C2 + iszt/S)                                  Liszt

>>                   Debussy and Ravel

Debussy                                 (L/C2 + iszt/P)                                       Liszt
Ravel                                (L/GC/S/abT + iszt/S)                                    Liszt

>>                        Gluck

Gluck                                    (L/S + iszt/C2)                                       Liszt

>>            Robert and Clara Schumann, John Field's nocturnes, songs of Robert Franz,

"Robert Schumann"                            (L/P + iszt/S)                                   Liszt
"Clara Schumann"                          (L/GC/S/abT + iszt/C2)                             Liszt

"John Field"                            (L/GC/S/abT + iszt/P)                                  Liszt
"Robert Franz"                          (L/GC/S/abT + iszt/T)                                  Liszt

>>                   George Sand

"George Sand"                            (L/C2 + iszt/GC/S/abT)                             Liszt

>>                    Meyerbeer

Meyerbeer                                   (L/T + iszt/P)                                      Liszt

>>                        Mozart

Mozart                                    (L/P + iszt/C2)/Ch                                   Liszt


•  Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt — Volume 1 (English) (as Author)
•  Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt — Volume 2 (English) (as Author)

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/C2)/+cp                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 1"               (Fr/P + "-anz Lisztr's writing"/C2)/+bp                "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)/+cp                "Essays and miscellanies"

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 (Fr/T + "-anz Liszt's writing"/C2)/+cp                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 2"               (Fr/T + "-anz Lisztr's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)/+cp                 "Essays and miscellanies"

•  F. Chopin (French) (as Author)

"F. Chopin"                 (Fr/C2 + "-anz Liszt's writing"/P)                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"F. Chopin"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)                   "Essays and miscellanies"

•  Letters of Franz Liszt -- Volume 1
from Paris to Rome: Years of Travel as a Virtuoso (English) (as Author)
•  Letters of Franz Liszt -- Volume 2
from Rome to the End (English) (as Author)

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)/+cp               "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 1"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/S)/+cp               "Essays and miscellanies"

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 2"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Essays and miscellanies"

•  Life of Chopin (English) (as Author)

"Life of Chopin"                   (Fr/C2 + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Life of Chopin"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/S)                   "Essays and miscellanies"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt — Volume 1"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a342 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3052 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3052/3052-h/3052-h.htm ,  
Essays and Miscellanies by Plutarch

PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS
THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO LIVE PLEASURABLY ACCORDING TO THE DOCTRINE OF EPICURUS.
PLUTARCH, ZEUXIPPUS, THEON, ARISTODEMUS.
Epicurus's great confidant and familiar, Colotes, set forth a book with this title to it, that according to the tenets of the other philosophers it is impossible to live. Now what occurred to me then to say against him, in the defence of those philosophers, hath been already put into writing by me. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in the walks in further opposition to his party, I thought it not amiss to recollect them also, if for no other reason, yet for this one, that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over the discourses and writings of those they would disprove, nor by tearing out one word here and another there, or by falling foul upon particular passages without the books, to impose upon the ignorant and unlearned.

Now as we were leaving the school to take a walk (as our manner is) in the gymnasium, Zeuxippus began to us: In my opinion, said he, the debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting. I am sure, Heraclides went away disgusted with us, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved. Yet you may remember, replied Theon, how you told them that Colotes himself, compared with the rhetoric of those two gentlemen, would appear the complaisantest man alive; for when they have raked together the lewdest terms of ignominy the tongue of man ever used, as buffooneries, trollings, arrogancies, whorings, assassinations, whining counterfeits, black-guards, and blockheads, they faintly throw them in the faces of Aristotle, Socrates, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Theophrastus, Heraclides, Hipparchus, and which not, even of the best and most celebrated authorities. So that, should they pass for very knowing men upon all other accounts, yet their very calumnies and reviling language would bespeak them at the greatest distance from philosophy imaginable. For emulation can never enter that godlike consort, nor such fretfulness as wants resolution to conceal its own resentments. Aristodemus then subjoined: Heraclides, you know, is a great philologist; and that may be the reason why he made Epicurus those amends for the poetic din (so, that party style poetry) and for the fooleries of Homer; or else, it may be, it was because Metrodorus had libelled that poet in so many books. But let us let these gentlemen pass at present, Zeuxippus, and rather return to what was charged upon the philosophers in the beginning of our discourse, that it is impossible to live according to their tenets. And I see not why we two may not despatch this affair betwixt us, with the good assistance of Theon; for I find this gentleman (meaning me) is already tired. Then Theon said to him,

     Our fellows have that garland from us won;

therefore, if you please,

     Let's fix another goal, and at that run.
     ("Odyssey," xxii, 6)

We will even prosecute them at the suit of the philosophers, in the following form: We'll prove, if we can, that it is impossible to live a pleasurable life according to their tenets. Bless me! said I to him, smiling, you seem to me to level your foot at the very bellies of the men, and to design to enter the list with them for their lives, whilst you go about to rob them thus of their pleasure, and they cry out to you,

     "Forbear, we're no good boxers, sir;

no, nor good pleaders, nor good senators, nor good magistrates either;

     "Our proper talent is to eat and drink."
     ("Odyssey," viii, 246, 248) ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3835/pg3835.html ,  
Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt,    Volume 1

I.
DEAR SIR,
If I take the liberty to trouble you with these lines, I must in the first instance rely solely on the great kindness with which you received me during your last short stay in Paris in the late autumn of last year, when Herr Schlesinger casually introduced me to you. There is, however, still another circumstance which encourages me to this step: My friend Heinrich Laube, the author, wrote to me last summer from Carlsbad that he had there made the acquaintance of one of your countrymen, who boasted of being your friend; that he had spoken to that gentleman of me and my plans, and engaged his interest in me to such an extent that he (the gentleman) of his own accord promised to introduce me to YOU, as he was on the point of starting for another watering-place, where he would be sure to meet you.

You observe, dear sir, with what remote and uncertain contingencies I am obliged to connect my great hope; you observe how anxiously I cling to feeble possibilities to attain a priceless boon. Was that promise ever fulfilled, and could it have been? My eternally unlucky star almost forbids me to believe it. The question, however, I owed to myself, and all I ask for at present is the honour of a Yes or a No!

With full admiration, your most devoted

RICHARD WAGNER
25, RUE DU HELDER, PARIS, March 24th, 1841.

2.

DEAR SIR,
At last you are within safe reach of me, ~ ~


"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/C2)/+cp                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 1"               (Fr/P + "-anz Lisztr's writing"/C2)/+bp                "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)/+cp                "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"I/one"                   (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/C2)/+cp                   "philosophical essays"

2.           that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

"DEAR SIR"                   (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/C2)/+cp                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.              If I take <the> liberty to trouble you with these lines

"If I take liberty to trouble you with these lines"                 (Pl/P + utarch/C2)/+cp                   Plutarch

4. I must in <the> first instance rely solely on <the> great kindness with which you received me during your last short stay in Paris in <the> late autumn of last year

"I must in first instance rely solely on great kindness with which you received me during your last short stay in Paris in late autumn of last year"                   (Z/P + euxippus/C2)/+cp                   Zeuxippus

5.
"when Herr Schlesinger casually introduced me to you"                 (Th/P + eon/C2)/+cp                 Theon

6.
"There is"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/C2)/+cp                    Aristodemus

7.
however                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/C2)/+cp                   "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
"still another circumstance which encourages me to this step"                   (C/P + olotes/C2)/+cp                   Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

"My friend Heinrich Laube"                   (s/P + "-et forth book with this title to it"/C2)/+cp                   "set forth book with this title to it"

10.   that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live --- <the> author

author                   (th/P + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/C2)/+cp                   "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11. wrote to me last summer from Carlsbad that he had there made <the> acquaintance of one of your countrymen

"wrote to me last summer from Carlsbad that he had there made acquaintance of one of your countrymen"                   (N/P + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/C2)/+cp                   "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.                  in <the> defence of those philosophers

"who boasted of being your friend"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in defence of those philosophers"/C2)/+cp                   "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
"that he had spoken to that gentleman of me and my plans"                   (h/P + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/C2)/+cp                   "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party --- and engaged his interest in me to such <an> extent that he

"and engaged his interest in me to such extent that he"                   (B/P + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/C2)/+cp                   "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.                      <the> gentleman

gentleman                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/C2)/+cp                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
"of his own accord promised to introduce me to YOU"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "if for no other reason"/C2)/+cp                   "if for no other reason"

17.               as he was on <the> point of starting for another watering

"as he was on point of starting for another watering"              (y/P + "-et for this one"/C2)/+cp                "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

place               (th/P + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/C2)/+cp                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.
"where he would be sure to meet you"                (n/P + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/C2)/+cp                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.               or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

"You observe"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/C2)/+cp                   "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"dear sir"                 (t/P + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/C2)/+cp                   "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

"with what remote and uncertain contingencies I am obliged to connect my great hope"                   (N/P + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/C2)/+cp                   "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.         you observe how anxiously I cling to feeble possibilities to attain <a> priceless boon

"you observe how anxiously I cling to feeble possibilities to attain priceless boon"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as our manner is"/C2)/+cp                   "as our manner is"

24.                    in <the> gymnasium

"Was that promise ever fulfilled"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in gymnasium"/C2)/+cp                   "in gymnasium"

25.
"and could it have been"                   (Z/P + "-euxippus began to us"/C2)/+cp                   "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
"My eternally unlucky star almost forbids me to believe it"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "In my opinion"/C2)/+cp                   "In my opinion"

27.                   <The> question

question                            (s/P + "-aid he"/C2)/+cp                           "said he"

28.     <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

however                   (d/P + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/C2)/+cp                   "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"


Et cetera    as below.


Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk - (with what remote and uncertain contingencies I am obliged to connect my great hope) -- (as our manner is - (you observe how anxiously I cling to feeble possibilities to attain priceless boon) --) in <the> gymnasium - (Was that promise ever fulfilled) --, Zeuxippus began to us - (and could it have been) --: In my opinion - (My eternally unlucky star almost forbids me to believe it) --, said he - (question) --, <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting - (however) --. I am sure - (I owed to myself) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (and all I ask for at present is <the> honour of <a> Yes or <a> No) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (With full admiration) --. Yet you may remember - (your most devoted RICHARD WAGNER 25) --, replied Theon - (RUE DU HELDER) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (PARIS) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (March 24th) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (1841) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (2/two) --, as buffooneries - (At last you are within safe reach of me)

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt — Volume 2"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/4234/pg4234.html ,    
Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt — Volume 2

143.
DEAREST RICHARD,

Yesterday (Saturday, January 7th) first performance of "Lohengrin" at Leipzig. The public, very numerous in spite of double prices, displayed much sympathy and admiration for this wonderful work. The first act went tolerably well as far as the artists were concerned. Rietz conducted in a precise and decent manner, and the ENSEMBLES had been carefully studied. The second and third acts, however, suffered much from the faults and shortcomings of both chorus and principals. Further performances will, no doubt, show an improvement, although the Leipzig theatre does certainly not possess the proper singers and scenic artists. The flagging in the second act, which I previously took the liberty of pointing out to you, was felt very much on this occasion, and the public seemed painfully and unmistakably tired. The tempi of the choruses seemed to me considerably too fast, and there was more than one break-down in this scene. Altogether, without self-conceit, I may say that the Leipzig performance is inferior to ours, as you will probably hear from other quarters. On the other hand the Leipzig public is in many respects superior to ours, and I feel convinced that the external success of yesterday's performance will prove very considerable indeed. The grand success of this work can no longer be denied; of that we should be glad, and the rest will follow sooner or later. ~ ~


"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 (Fr/T + "-anz Liszt's writing"/C2)/+cp                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 2"               (Fr/T + "-anz Lisztr's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Essays and miscellanies"/C2)/+cp                 "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"143 (one hundred forty three)"                   (ph/T + "-ilosophical essays"/C2)/+cp                   "philosophical essays"

2.           that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

"DEAREST RICHARD"                   (th/T + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/C2)/+cp                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.
Yesterday                              (Pl/T + utarch/C2)/+cp                              Plutarch

4.
Saturday                             (Z/T + euxippus/C2)/+cp                           Zeuxippus

5.
"January 7th"                            (Th/T + eon/C2)/+cp                                Theon

6.
"first performance of"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristodemus/C2)/+cp                    Aristodemus

7.
Lohengrin                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/C2)/+cp                   "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
"at Leipzig"                               (C/T + olotes/C2)/+cp                            Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it --- <The> public

public                  (s/T + "-et forth book with this title to it"/C2)/+cp                   "set forth book with this title to it"

10.           that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

"very numerous in spite of double prices"                   (th/T + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/C2)/+cp                   "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.
"displayed much sympathy and admiration for this wonderful work"                   (N/T + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/C2)/+cp                   "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12. in <the> defence of those philosophers --- <The> first act went tolerably well as far as <the> artists were concerned

"first act went tolerably well as far as artists were concerned"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "in defence of those philosophers"/C2)/+cp                   "in defence of those philosophers"

13.               Rietz conducted in <a> precise and decent manner

"Rietz conducted in precise and decent manner"                   (h/T + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/C2)/+cp                   "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party --- and <the> ENSEMBLES had been carefully studied

"and ENSEMBLES had been carefully studied"                   (B/T + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/C2)/+cp                   "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.               <The> second and third acts

"second and third acts"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/C2)/+cp                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.
however                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "if for no other reason"/C2)/+cp                   "if for no other reason"

17.               suffered much from <the> faults and shortcomings of both chorus and principals

"suffered much from faults and shortcomings of both chorus and principals"                   (y/T + "-et for this one"/C2)/+cp                   "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

"Further performances will"                   (th/T + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/C2)/+cp                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.
"no doubt"                   (n/T + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/C2)/+cp                   "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.    or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books --- show <an> improvement

"show improvement"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/S)/+bp                   "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21. to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned --- although <the> Leipzig theatre does certainly not possess <the> proper singers and scenic artists

"although Leipzig theatre does certainly not possess proper singers and scenic artists"                   (t/T + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/C2)/+cp                   "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.  Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk --- <The> flagging in <the> second act

"flagging in second act"                   (N/T + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/C2)/+cp                   "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.                  which I previously took <the> liberty of pointing out to you

"which I previously took liberty of pointing out to you"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "as our manner is"/C2)/+cp                  "as our manner is"

24.                    in <the> gymnasium

"was felt very much on this occasion"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "in gymnasium"/C2)/+cp                  "in gymnasium"

25.                and <the> public seemed painfully and unmistakably tired

"and public seemed painfully and unmistakably tired"                 (Z/T + "-euxippus began to us"/C2)/+cp                 "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.              <The> tempi of <the> choruses seemed to me considerably too fast

"tempi of choruses seemed to me considerably too fast"                ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "In my opinion"/C2)/+cp                 "In my opinion"

27.
"and there was more than one break"               (s/T + "-aid he"/C2)/+cp               "said he"

28.     <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

"down in this scene"                   (d/T + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/C2)/+cp                   "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"


Et cetera    as below.


I am sure - (Altogether) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (without self) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (conceit) --. Yet you may remember - (I may say that <the> Leipzig performance is inferior to ours) --, replied Theon - (as you will probably hear from other quarters) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (On <the> other hand <the> Leipzig public is in many respects superior to ours) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (and I feel convinced that <the> external success of yesterday's performance will prove very considerable indeed) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (<The> grand success of this work can no longer be denied) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (of that we should be glad) --, as buffooneries - (and <the> rest will follow sooner or later)

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "F. Chopin"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21669/21669-h/21669-h.htm ,    
F. Chopin

1.

Weimar 1850.

Chopin! doux et harmonieux génie! Quel est le cœur auquel il fut cher, quelle est la personne à laquelle il fut familier qui, en l'entendant nommer, n'éprouve un tressaillement, comme au souvenir d'un être supérieur qu'il eut la fortune de connaître? Mais, quelque regretté qu'il soit par tous les artistes et par tous ses nombreux amis, il nous est peut-être permis de douter que le moment soit déjà venu où, apprécié à sa juste valeur, celui dont la perte nous est si particulièrement sensible, occupe dans l'estime universelle le haut rang que lui réserve l'avenir.

S'il a été souvent prouvé que nul n'est prophète en son pays, n'est-il pas d'expérience aussi que les hommes de l'avenir, ceux qui le pressentent et le rapprochent par leurs œuvres, ne sont pas reconnus prophètes par leurs temps?... À vrai dire, pourrait-il en être autrement? Sans nous en prendre à ces sphères où le raisonnement devrait, jusqu'à un certain point, servir de garant à l'expérience, nous oserons affirmer que, dans le domaine des arts, tout génie innovateur, tout auteur qui délaisse l'idéal, le type, les formes dont se nourrissaient et s'enchantaient les esprits de son temps, pour évoquer un idéal nouveau, créer de nouveaux types et des formes inconnues, blessera sa génération contemporaine. Ce n'est que la génération suivante qui comprendra sa pensée, ~ ~


"F. Chopin"                 (Fr/C2 + "-anz Liszt's writing"/P)                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"F. Chopin"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/P)                   "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"1/un"                     (ph/C2 + "-ilosophical essays"/P)                   "philosophical essays"

2.           that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

"Weimar 1850"                     (th/C2 + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/P)                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.
Chopin                                    (P/C2 + lutarch/P)                                Plutarch

4.
"doux et harmonieux génie"                     (Z/C2 + euxippus/P)                     Zeuxippus

5.                   Quel est <le> cœur auquel il fut cher

"Quel est cœur auquel il fut cher"                      (Th/C2 + eon/P)                       Theon

6.                  quelle est <la> personne à laquelle il fut familier qui

"quelle est personne à laquelle il fut familier qui"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Aristodemus/P)                 Aristodemus

7.                     en <l'>entendant nommer

"en entendant nommer"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/P)             "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.                       n'éprouve <un> tressaillement

"n'éprouve tressaillement"                         (C/C2 + olotes/P)                        Colotes

9. set forth <a> book with this title to it --- comme au souvenir d'<un> être supérieur qu'il eut <la> fortune de connaître

"comme au souvenir d' être supérieur qu'il eut fortune de connaître"           (s/C2 + "-et forth book with this title to it"/P)           "set forth book with this title to it"

10.          that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

Mais              (th/C2 + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/P)             "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.             quelque regretté qu'il soit par tous <les> artistes et par tous ses nombreux amis

"’quelque regretté qu'il soit par tous artistes et par tous ses nombreux amis"              (N/C2 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/P)              "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.                      in <the> defence of those philosophers

"il nous est peut"               ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in defence of those philosophers"/P)               "in defence of those philosophers"

13.                  être permis de douter que <le> moment soit déjà venu où

"être permis de douter que moment soit déjà venu où"                (h/C2 + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/P)               "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party

"apprécié à sa juste valeur"               (B/C2 + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/P)              "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.               celui dont <la> perte nous est si particulièrement sensible

"celui dont perte nous est si particulièrement sensible"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/P)                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.              occupe dans <l'>estime universelle <le> haut rang que lui réserve <l'>avenir

"occupe dans estime universelle haut rang que lui réserve avenir"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "if for no other reason"/P)              "if for no other reason"

17.
"S'il a été souvent prouvé que nul n'est prophète en son pays"                  (y/C2 + "-et for this one"/P)                    "yet for this one

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

n'est                     (th/C2 + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/P)                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.               il pas d'expérience aussi que <les> hommes de <l'>avenir

"il pas d'expérience aussi que hommes de avenir"                   (n/c2 + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/P)                   "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20. or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books --- ceux qui <le> pressentent et <le> rapprochent par leurs œuvres

"ceux qui pressentent et rapprochent par leurs œuvres"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/P)                 "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"ne sont pas reconnus prophètes par leurs temps"                 (t/C2 + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/P)                 "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

"À vrai dire"                  (N/C2 + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/P)                 "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
"’Tis Sandwyk beach"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "as our manner is"/P)                "as our manner is"

24.                    in <the> gymnasium

pourrait                       ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in gymnasium"/P)                   "in gymnasium"

25.
"il en être autrement"               (Z/C2 + "-euxippus began to us"/P)              "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.                Sans nous en prendre à ces sphères où <le> raisonnement devrait

"Sans nous en prendre à ces sphères où raisonnement devrait"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "In my opinion"/P)                "In my opinion"

27.                   jusqu'à <un> certain point

"jusqu'à certain point"                           (s/C2 + "-aid he"/P)                      "said he"

28. <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting --- servir de garant à <l'>expérience

"servir de garant à expérience"                 (d/C2 + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/P)                "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera    as below.


I am sure - (nous oserons affirmer que) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (dans <le> domaine des arts) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (tout génie innovateur) --. Yet you may remember - (tout auteur qui délaisse <l'>idéal) --, replied Theon - (<le> type) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (<les> formes dont se nourrissaient et s'enchantaient <les> esprits de son temps) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (pour évoquer <un> idéal nouveau) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (créer de nouveaux types et des formes inconnues) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (blessera sa génération contemporaine) --, as buffooneries - (Ce n'est que <la> génération suivante qui comprendra sa pensée)

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "Letters of Franz Liszt — Volume 1"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3689/pg3689.html ,    
Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 1, "From Paris to Rome: Years of Travel as a Virtuoso"

DEDICATION

To the Memory of
MY BROTHER WALTER,
AND TO OUR
DEAR AND HONORED FRIEND
A.J. HIPKINS, ESQ.,
I DEDICATE THIS TRANSLATION.
—C.B.

PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION, BY CONSTANCE BACHE

In writing a few words of Preface I wish to express, first and foremost, my appreciation of the extreme care and conscientiousness with which La Mara has prepared these volumes. In a spirit of no less reverence I have endeavored, in the English translation, to adhere as closely as possible to all the minute characteristics that add expression to Liszt's letters: punctuation has, of necessity, undergone alteration, but italics, inverted commas, dashes and other marks have been strictly observed. It may be objected that unnecessary particularity has been shown in the translation of various titles, names of Societies or newspapers, quotations, etc.; but there are many people who, while understanding French, do not read German, and vice versa, and therefore it has seemed better to translate everything. Where anything has been omitted in the printed letters I have adhered to the sign .—. employed by La Mara to indicate the hiatus. It has seemed best to preserve the spelling of all proper names as written by Liszt, and not to Anglicise any, as it is impossible to do all; and therefore, ~ ~


"Letters of Franz Liszt"               (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)/+cp               "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 1"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/S)/+cp               "Essays and miscellanies"


1.
"From Paris to Rome"                   (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/S)/+cp                   "philosophical essays"

2. that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus --- Years of Travel as <a> Virtuoso

"Years of Travel as Virtuoso"                   (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/S)/+cp                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.                DEDICATION To <the> Memory of MY BROTHER WALTER

"DEDICATION To Memory of MY BROTHER WALTER"                 (Pl/P + utarch/S)/+cp                   Plutarch

4.
"AND TO OUR DEAR AND HONORED FRIEND A"                   (Z/P + euxippus/S)/+cp                   Zeuxippus

5.
J                                     (Th/P + eon/S)/+cp                                     Theon

6.
HIPKINS                      ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/S)/+cp                      Aristodemus

7.
"E S Q"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/S)/+cp                   "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
"I DEDICATE THIS TRANSLATION"                   (C/P + olotes/S)/+cp                   Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

C                   (s/P + "-et forth book with this title to it"/S/+cp                   "set forth book with this title to it"

10.           that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

B                   (th/P + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/S)/+cp                   "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.               PREFACE TO <THE> ENGLISH EDITION

"PREFACE TO ENGLISH EDITION"                   (N/P + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/S)/+cp                   "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12. in <the> defence of those philosophers --- BY CONSTANCE BACHE In writing <a> few words of Preface I wish to express

"BY CONSTANCE BACHE In writing few words of Preface I wish to express"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in defence of those philosophers"/S)/+cp                   "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
"first and foremost"                   (h/P + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/S)/+cp                   "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party --- my appreciation of <the> extreme care and conscientiousness with which La Mara has prepared these volumes

"my appreciation of extreme care and conscientiousness with which La Mara has prepared these volumes"                   (B/P + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/S)/+cp                   "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.                   In <a> spirit of no less reverence I have endeavored

"In spirit of no less reverence I have endeavored"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/S)/+cp                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.                    in <the> English translation

"in English translation"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "if for no other reason"/S)/+cp                   "if for no other reason"

17. to adhere as closely as possible to all <the> minute characteristics that add expression to Liszt's letters

"to adhere as closely as possible to all minute characteristics that add expression to Liszt's letters"              (y/P + "-et for this one"/S)/+cp                "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

"punctuation has"               (th/P + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/S)/+cp                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.
"of necessity"                (n/P + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/S)/+cp                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.               or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

"undergone alteration"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/S)/+cp                   "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"but italics"                 (t/P + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/S)/+cp                   "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

"inverted commas"                   (N/P + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/S)/+cp                   "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
"dashes and other marks have been strictly observed"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as our manner is"/S)/+cp                   "as our manner is"

24. in <the> gymnasium --- It may be objected that unnecessary particularity has been shown in <the> translation of various titles

"It may be objected that unnecessary particularity has been shown in translation of various titles"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in gymnasium"/S)/+cp                 "in gymnasium"

25.
"names of Societies or newspapers"                  (Z/P + "-euxippus began to us"/S)/+cp                  "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
quotations                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "In my opinion"/S)/+cp                   "In my opinion"

27.
"e t c"                            (s/P + "-aid he"/S)/+cp                           "said he"

28.     <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

"but there are many people who"                   (d/P + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/S)/+cp                   "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera    as below.


I am sure - (while understanding French) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (do not read German) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (and vice versa) --. Yet you may remember - (and therefore it has seemed better to translate everything) --, replied Theon - (Where anything has been omitted in <the> printed letters I have adhered to <the> sign) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (employed by La Mara to indicate <the> hiatus) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (It has seemed best to preserve <the> spelling of all proper names as written by Liszt) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (and not to Anglicise any) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (as it is impossible to do all) --, as buffooneries - (and therefore)

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "Letters of Franz Liszt — Volume 2"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3750/pg3750.html ,  
Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 2: "From Rome to the End"

FRONTISPIECE TO VOLUME II, HONORING LISZT

I.

We welcome thee, from southern sunnier clime,
To England's shore,
And stretch glad hands across the lapse of time
To the once more.

II.

Full twice two decades swiftly have rolled by
Since thou wast here;
A meteor flashing through our northern sky
Thou didst appear.

III.

Thy coming now we greet with pleasure keen,
And loyal heart,
Adding tradition of what thou hast been
To what thou art.

IV.

No laurel can we weave into the crown
Long years entwine,
Nor add one honour into the renown
Already thine:

V.

Yet might these roses waft to thee a breath
Of memory,
Recalling thy fair Saint Elizabeth
Of Hungary

VI.

We welcome her, from out those days of old,
In song divine,
But thee we greet a thousand fold,
The song is thine!

—C.B.

1. To Dr. Franz Brendel

[Rome,] December 20th, 1861

Dear Friend,

For the New Year I bring you nothing new; my soon ageing attachment and friendship remain unalterably yours. Let me hope that it will be granted to me to give you more proof of it from year to year.

Since the beginning of October I have remained without news from Germany. How are my friends Bronsart, ~ ~


"Letters of Franz Liszt"               (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Volume 2"                 (Fr/P + "-anz Liszt's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Franz Liszt's writing"

"Letters of Franz Liszt"               ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Essays and miscellanies"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Essays and miscellanies"


1.                    From Rome to <the> End

"From Rome to End"                   (ph/P + "-ilosophical essays"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "philosophical essays"

2.            that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

"FRONTISPIECE TO VOLUME i i"                   (th/P + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.
"HONORING LISZT i"                    (Pl/P + utarch/GC/S/abT)/+cp                     Plutarch

4.
"We welcome thee"                   (Z/P + euxippus/GC/S/abT)/+cp                    Zeuxippus

5.
"from southern sunnier clime"                   (Th/P + eon/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 Theon

6.
"To England's shore"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Aristodemus/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 Aristodemus

7.               And stretch glad hands across <the> lapse of time To <the> once more

"And stretch glad hands across lapse of time To once more"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/S)/+cp                   "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
"i i"                               (C/P + olotes/GC/S/abT)/+cp                             Colotes

9.          set forth <a> book with this title to it

"Full twice two decades swiftly have rolled by Since thou wast here"                   (s/P + "-et forth book with this title to it"/GC/S/abT/+cp                   "set forth book with this title to it"

10. that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live --- <A> meteor flashing through our northern sky Thou didst appear

"meteor flashing through our northern sky Thou didst appear"                  (th/P + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.
"i i i"                   (N/P + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.                    in <the> defence of those philosophers

"Thy coming now we greet with pleasure keen"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in defence of those philosophers"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
"And loyal heart"                   (h/P + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party

"Adding tradition of what thou hast been To what thou art"                   (B/P + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.
"i v"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.                No laurel can we weave into <the> crown Long years entwine

"No laurel can we weave into crown Long years entwine"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "if for no other reason"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "if for no other reason"

17.                  Nor add one honour into renown Already thine

"Nor add one honour into renown Already thine"              (y/P + "-et for this one"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                "yet for this one"

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

v               (th/P + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.                     Yet might these roses waft to thee <a> breath Of memory

"Yet might these roses waft to thee breath Of memory"                (n/P + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.               or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

"Recalling thy fair Saint Elizabeth Of Hungary v i"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"We welcome her"                 (t/P + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

"from out those days of old"                   (N/P + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
"In song divine"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "as our manner is"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "as our manner is"

24.                 in <the> gymnasium --- But thee we greet <a> thousand fold

"But thee we greet thousand fold"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in gymnasium"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 "in gymnasium"

25.                     <The> song is thine

"song is thine"                  (Z/P + "-euxippus began to us"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
C                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "In my opinion"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "In my opinion"

27.
B                              (s/P + "-aid he"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                            "said he"

28.     <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting

"1/one"                   (d/P + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                   "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera    as below.


I am sure - (To d r) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (Franz Brendel) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (Rome) --. Yet you may remember - (December 20th) --, replied Theon - (1861 Dear Friend) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (For <the> New Year I bring you nothing new) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (my soon ageing attachment and friendship remain unalterably yours) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (Let me hope that it will be granted to me to give you more proof of it from year to year) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (Since the beginning of October I have remained without news from Germany) --, as buffooneries - (How are my friends Bronsart)

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Franz Liszt's  "Life of Chopin"    and  Plutarch's "Essays and miscellanies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4386/4386-h/4386-h.htm ,    
Life of Chopin

DEDICATION OF THE TRANSLATION TO JAN PYCHOWSKI

Without your consent or knowledge, I have ventured to dedicate this translation to you!

As the countryman of Chopin, and filled with the same earnest patriotism which distinguished him; as an impassioned and perfect Pianist, capable, of reproducing his difficult compositions in all the subtle tenderness, fire, energy, melancholy, despair, caprice, hope, delicacy and startling vigor which they imperiously exact; as thorough master of the complicated instrument to which he devoted his best powers; as an erudite and experienced possessor of that abstruse and difficult science, music; as a composer of true, deep, and highly original genius,—this dedication is justly made to you!

Even though I may have wounded your characteristically haughty, shrinking, and Sclavic susceptibilities in rendering so public a tribute to your artistic skill, forgive me! The high moral worth and manly rectitude which distinguish you, and which alone render even the most sublime genius truly illustrious in the eyes of woman, almost force these inadequate and imperfect words from the heart of the translator.
M.W.C.

PREFACE

To a people, always prompt in its recognition of genius, and ready to sympathize in the joys and woes of a truly great artist, this work will be one of exceeding interest. It is a short, glowing, ~ ~


"Life of Chopin"                   (Fr/C2 + "-anz Liszt's writing"/S)                   "Franz Liszt's writing"
"Life of Chopin"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Essays and miscellanies"/S)                   "Essays and miscellanies"


1. DEDICATION OF <THE> TRANSLATION TO JAN PYCHOWSKI Without your consent or knowledge

"DEDICATION OF TRANSLATION TO JAN PYCHOWSKI Without your consent or knowledge"                     (ph/C2 + "-ilosophical essays"/S)                   "philosophical essays"

2.           that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to <the> doctrine of Epicurus

"I have ventured to dedicate this translation to you"                     (th/C2 + "-at it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"/S)                   "that it is not possible to live pleasurably according to doctrine of Epicurus"

3.                  As <the> countryman of Chopin

"As countryman of Chopin"                         (Pl/C2 + utarch/S)                      Plutarch

4.              and filled with <the> same earnest patriotism which distinguished him

"and filled with same earnest patriotism which distinguished him"                     (Z/C2 + euxippus/S)                     Zeuxippus

5.                   as <an> impassioned and perfect Pianist

"as impassioned and perfect Pianist"                    (Th/C2 + eon/S)                     Theon

6.                  
capable                         ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Aristodemus/S)                       Aristodemus

7.                of reproducing his difficult compositions in all <the> subtle tenderness

"of reproducing his difficult compositions in all subtle tenderness"              ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"/S)             "Epicurus's great confidant and familiar"

8.
fire                                     (C/C2 + olotes/S)                                    Colotes

9.                          set forth <a> book with this title to it

energy           (s/C2 + "-et forth book with this title to it"/S)           "set forth book with this title to it"

10.          that according to <the> tenets of <the> other philosophers it is impossible to live

Mais              (th/C2 + "-at according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"/S)             "that according to tenets of other philosophers it is impossible to live"

11.
melancholy              (N/C2 + "-ow what occurred to me then to say against him"/S)              "Now what occurred to me then to say against him"

12.                      in <the> defence of those philosophers

despair               ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in defence of those philosophers"/S)               "in defence of those philosophers"

13.
caprice                (h/C2 + "-ath been already put into writing by me"/S)               "hath been already put into writing by me"

14. But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in <the> walks in further opposition to his party

hope                (B/C2 + "-ut since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"/S)              "But since upon breaking up of our lecture several things have happened to be spoken afterwards in walks in further opposition to his party"

15.
"delicacy and startling vigor which they imperiously exact"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"/S)                   "I thought it not amiss to recollect them also"

16.      as thorough master of <the> complicated instrument to which he devoted his best powers

"as thorough master of complicated instrument to which he devoted his best powers"                ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "if for no other reason"/S)              "if for no other reason"

17.            as <an> erudite and experienced possessor of that abstruse and difficult science

"as erudite and experienced possessor of that abstruse and difficult science"                  (y/C2 + "-et for this one"/S)                    "yet for this one

18. that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over <the> discourses and writings of those they would disprove

music                     (th/C2 + "-at those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"/S)                   "that those who will needs be contradicting other men may see that they ought not to run cursorily over discourses and writings of those they would disprove"

19.                    as <a> composer of true

"as composer of true"                   (n/c2 + "-or by tearing out one word here and another there"/S)                   "nor by tearing out one word here and another there"

20.               or by falling foul upon particular passages without <the> books

deep                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"/S)                 "or by falling foul upon particular passages without books"

21.               to impose upon <the> ignorant and unlearned

"and highly original genius"                 (t/C2 + "-o impose upon ignorant and unlearned"/S)                 "to impose upon ignorant and unlearned"

22.               Now as we were leaving <the> school to take <a> walk

"this dedication is justly made to you"                  (N/C2 + "-ow as we were leaving school to take walk"/S)                 "Now as we were leaving school to take walk"

23.
"’Even though I may have wounded your characteristically haughty"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "as our manner is"/S)                "as our manner is"

24.                    in <the> gymnasium

shrinking                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "in gymnasium"/S)                   "in gymnasium"

25.                and Sclavic susceptibilities in rendering so public <a> tribute to your artistic skill

"and Sclavic susceptibilities in rendering so public tribute to your artistic skill"               (Z/C2 + "-euxippus began to us"/S)              "Zeuxippus began to us"

26.
"forgive me"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "In my opinion"/S)                  "In my opinion"

27.                  <The> high moral worth and manly rectitude which distinguish you

"high moral worth and manly rectitude which distinguish you"                 (s/C2 + "-aid he"/S)                  "said he"

28. <the> debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting --- and which alone render even <the> most sublime genius truly illustrious in <the> eyes of woman

"and which alone render even most sublime genius truly illustrious in eyes of woman"                 (d/C2 + "-ebate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"/S)                "debate was managed on our side with more softness and less freedom than was fitting"

Et cetera    as below.


I am sure - (almost force these inadequate and imperfect words from <the> heart of <the> translator) --, Heraclides went away disgusted with us - (M) --, for handling Epicurus and Aletrodorus more roughly than they deserved - (W) --. Yet you may remember - (C) --, replied Theon - (PREFACE To <a> people) --, how you told them that Colotes himself - (always prompt in its recognition of genius) --, compared with <the> rhetoric of those two gentlemen - (and ready to sympathize in <the> joys and woes of <a> truly great artist) --, would appear <the> complaisantest man alive - (this work will be one of exceeding interest) --; for when they have raked together <the> lewdest terms of ignominy <the> tongue of man ever used - (It is <a> short) --, as buffooneries - (glowing)

Et cetera.



Victor Hugo
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Victor+Hugo ,  

*        While taking Korea/경상-도 [gyΛŋ  saŋ  do/province] (dialect) speaking posture (as coarticulation posture);   if articulating (or trying to speak) "Buddha" or "석가모니 [sΛg  ga  mo  ni]"   (or Siddhārtha Gautama, Siddhattha Gotama   or   Kassapa Buddha    or   revolutionary, pioneer, innovator, groundbreaker, or mastermind)  or  "Washington"  from Korea/경기-도 [gyΛŋ  gi  do/province]/개성-시 [gæ  sΛŋ  si/city] (dialect) /S speaking posture,     "Aristophanes [ŋA  ri  s=  to  p=  ha  ne  s=]" is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

Aristophanes                              (S/P + ocrates/C2)/abT                       Socrates

*               Aristophanes  >>  ("Victor Hugo" /P/Ch)/S

Born                             26 February 1802                         Besançon, France
Died                          22 May 1885 (aged 83)                         Paris, France

"1802"                         (V/P + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/+bp                           "Victor Hugo"
February                       (V/P + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/+cp                           "Victor Hugo"
"26"                         (V/P + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/Ch/+bp                          "Victor Hugo"
"Besançon, France"                  (V/P + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo"

"1885"                         (V/T + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/+bp                           "Victor Hugo"
May                            (V/T + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/+cp                           "Victor Hugo"
"22"                         (V/T + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/Ch/+bp                          "Victor Hugo"
"Paris, France"                   (V/T + "-ictor Hugo"/S)/Ch/+cp                      "Victor Hugo"

>>              Hippolyte Taine

Taine                             (V/P + "-ictor Hugo"/T)                              "Victor Hugo"

>>               the Goncourts

Goncourts                           (V/S + "-ictor Hugo"/P)                           "Victor Hugo"

>>                Émile Zola

"Émile Zola"                         (V/S + "-ictor Hugo"/C2)                         "Victor Hugo"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/h#a85 ,  

•  Actes et Paroles, Volume 1 (French) (as Author)
•  Actes et Paroles, Volume 2
Pendant l'exil 1852-1870 (French) (as Author)
•  Actes et Paroles, Volume 3 (French) (as Author)
•  Actes et Paroles, Volume 4
Depuis l'Exil 1876-1885 (French) (as Author)

"Actes et Paroles"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Volume 1"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

"Actes et Paroles"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/S)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Volume 2 Pendant l'exil 1852-1870"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/S)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

"Actes et Paroles"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/C2)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Volume 3"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/C2)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

"Actes et Paroles"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Volume 4 Depuis l'Exil 1876-1885"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

"Actes et Paroles"                             (B/T + irds/P)/+cp                              Birds
"Actes et Paroles"                             (B/T + irds/S)/+cp                              Birds
"Actes et Paroles"                             (B/T + irds/C2)/+cp                             Birds
"Actes et Paroles"                          (B/T + irds/GC/S/abT)/+cp                         Birds

•  Les contemplations
Aujourd'hui, 1843-1856 (French) (as Author)
•  Les contemplations
Autrefois, 1830-1843 (French) (as Author)

contemplations                (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Aujourd'hui, 1843-1856"                (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

contemplations                (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Autrefois, 1830-1843"                (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1" & "The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2"

contemplations                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/P)/+cp                  "Eleven Comedies"
contemplations                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/T)/+cp                  "Eleven Comedies"

•  De Ellendigen (Deel 1 van 5) (Dutch) (as Author)

"De Ellendigen"                (V/C1 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Deel 1 van 5"                (V/C1 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Frogs"

"De Ellendigen"                            (Fr/C1 + ogs/P)/+cp                             Frogs

•  Le Dernier Jour d'un Condamné (French) (as Author)

"Dernier Jour d' Condamné"                (V/GC/S/abT + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

"Dernier Jour d' Condamné"                (Ly/GC/S/abT + sistrata /P)/+cp                  Lysistrata

•  La Esmeralda (French) (as Author)

Esmeralda                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Peace"

Esmeralda                              (P/C2 + eace/GC/S/abT)/+cp                         Peace

•  Han d'Islande (French) (as Author)

"Han d'Islande"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Frogs"

"Han d'Islande"                              (Fr/C2 + ogs/T)/+cp                             Frogs

•  Hernani (French) (as Author)

Hernani                 (V/GC/S/abT + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/S)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Peace"

Hernani                                (P/GC/S/abT + eace/S)/+cp                          Peace

•  The History of a Crime
The Testimony of an Eye-Witness (English) (as Author)

"History of Crime"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Testimony of Eye-Witness"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

"History of Crime"                         (Ly/C2 + sistrata/T)/+cp                       Lysistrata

•  L'homme Qui Rit (French) (as Author)

"homme Qui Rit"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

"homme Qui Rit"                               (B/C2 + irds/T)/Ch/+cp                        Birds

•  The Hunchback of Notre Dame (English) (as Author)

"Hunchback of Notre Dame"                 (V/GC/S/abT + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Hunchback of Notre Dame"                 (C/GC/S/abT + louds/C2)/Ch/+cp                  Clouds

•  International Short Stories: French (English) (as Contributor)

"International Short Stories"                 (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Peace"

"International Short Stories"                 (P/T + eace/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                   Peace

•  La Légende des Siècles (English) (as Author)
•  La Légende des Siècles (French) (as Author)

"Légende des Siècles"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"
"Légende des Siècles"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Frogs"

"Légende des Siècles"                        (Fr/C2 + ogs/P)/Ch/+cp                         Frogs
"Légende des Siècles"                        (Fr/C2 + ogs/P)/Ch/+bp                         Frogs

•  Littérature et Philosophie mêlées (French) (as Author)

"Littérature et Philosophie mêlées"                 (V/P + "-ictor Hugo's work"/T)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Peace"

"Littérature et Philosophie mêlées"                 (P/P + eace/T)/Ch/+bp                  Peace

•  The Man Who Laughs (English) (as Author)

"Man Who Laughs"                 (V/C2 + "-ictor Hugo's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Man Who Laughs"                         (Cl/C2 + ouds/S)/Ch/+bp                        Clouds

•  The Memoirs of Victor Hugo (English) (as Author)

"Memoirs of Victor Hugo"                 (V/GC/S/abT + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Memoirs of Victor Hugo"                 (C/GC/S/abT + louds/C2)/Ch/+bp                  Clouds

•  Les Misérables (English) (as Author)

•  Les misérables Tome I
Fantine (French) (as Author)
•  Les misérables Tome II
Cosette (French) (as Author)
•  Les misérables Tome III
Marius (French) (as Author)
•  Les misérables Tome IV
L'idylle rue Plumet et l'épopée rue Saint-Denis (French) (as Author)
•  Les misérables Tome V
Jean Valjean (French) (as Author)

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Tome I"                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Tome II"                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Tome III"                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Tome IV"                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

misérables                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/S)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Tome V"                  (V/T + "-ictor Hugo's work"/S)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Aristophane; Traduction nouvelle, Tome premier" & "Aristophane; Traduction nouvelle, tome second"

misérables                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/S)/Ch/+bp                    Aristophane

misérables                    ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/C2)/+cp                     Aristophane
misérables                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/C2)/Ch/+cp                   Aristophane
misérables                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Aristophane
misérables                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  Aristophane
misérables                     ([ŋ=  w=]/T + Aristophane/S)/+cp                      Aristophane

•  Napoléon Le Petit (French) (as Author)
•  Napoleon the Little (English) (as Author)

"Napoléon Petit"                 (V/P + "-ictor Hugo's work"/T)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Napoléon Little"                 (V/P + "-ictor Hugo's work"/T)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Acharnians"

"Napoléon Petit"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Acharnians/T)/+cp                    Acharnians
"Napoléon Little"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Acharnians/T)/+bp                    Acharnians

•  Notre-Dame de Paris (French) (as Author)
•  Notre-Dame De Paris (English) (as Author)

"Notre-Dame de Paris"                 (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"
"Notre-Dame De Paris"                 (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1" & "The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2"

"Notre-Dame de Paris"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Eleven Comedies"
"Notre-Dame De Paris"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"

•  Poems (English) (as Author)

Poems                   (V/P + "-ictor Hugo's work"/T)/+bp                   "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

Poems                                  (B/P + irds/T)/+bp                                    Birds

•  Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books
with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations (English) (as Contributor)

"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations"                (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/T)/+bp                "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations"                (C/S + louds/T)/+bp                Clouds

•  Quatrevingt-Treize (French) (as Author)

"Quatrevingt-Treize"                   (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/P)/+bp                   "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Frogs"

"Quatrevingt-Treize"                            (Fr/S + ogs/P)/+bp                            Frogs

•  Le Roi s'amuse (French) (as Author)

"Roi s'amuse"                   (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/C2)/+bp                   "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Peace"

"Roi s'amuse"                              (P/S + eace/C2)/+bp                              Peace

•  Toilers of the Sea (English) (as Author)

"Toilers of Sea"                   (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   "Victor Hugo's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

"Toilers of Sea"                          (B/S + irds/GC/S/abT)/+bp                           Birds



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Victor Hugo's  "Hunchback of Notre Dame"    and     Aristophanes' "Clouds"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

Scene: The interior of a sleeping-apartment:
     Strepsiades, Phidippides, and two servants are in their
     beds; a small house is seen at a distance. Time:
     midnight.

     Strepsiades (sitting up in his bed). Ah me! Ah me! O
     King Jupiter, of what a terrible length the nights are!
     Will it never be day? And yet long since I heard the
     cock. My domestics are snoring; but they would not have
     done so heretofore! May you perish then, O war! For many
     reasons; because I may not even punish my domestics.
     Neither does this excellent youth awake through the
     night; but takes his ease, wrapped up in five blankets.
     Well, if it is the fashion, let us snore wrapped up.

     [Lies down, and then almost immediately starts up
     again.]

     But I am not able, miserable man, to sleep, being
     tormented by my expenses, and my stud of horses, and my
     debts, through this son of mine. He with his long hair,
     is riding horses and driving curricles, and dreaming of
     horses; while I am driven to distraction, as I see the
     moon bringing on the twentieths;  for the interest is
     running on. Boy! Light a lamp, and bring forth my
     tablets, that I may take them and read to how many I am
     indebted, and calculate the interest.

     [Enter boy with a light and tablets.]

     Come, let me see; what do I owe? Twelve minae  to
     Pasias. Why twelve minae to Pasias? Why did I borrow
     them? When I bought the blood-horse. Ah me, unhappy! ~ ~


http://www.literaturepage.com/read/hunchbackofnotredame.html ,  
The Hunchback of Notre Dame

PREFACE.

A few years ago, while visiting or, rather, rummaging about Notre-Dame, the author of this book found, in an obscure nook of one of the towers, the following word, engraved by hand upon the wall:--


       ANArKH.

These Greek capitals, black with age, and quite deeply graven in the stone, with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic caligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes, as though with the purpose of revealing that it had been a hand of the Middle Ages which had inscribed them there, and especially the fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them, struck the author deeply.

He questioned himself; he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon the brow of the ancient church.

Afterwards, the wall was whitewashed or scraped down, I know not which, and the inscription disappeared. For it is thus that people have been in the habit of proceeding with the marvellous churches of the Middle Ages for the last two hundred years. Mutilations come to them from every quarter, from within as well as from without. The priest whitewashes them, the archdeacon scrapes them down; then the populace arrives and demolishes them.

Thus, with the exception of the fragile memory which the author of this book here consecrates to it, there remains to-day nothing whatever of the mysterious word engraved within the gloomy tower of Notre-Dame,--nothing of the destiny which it so sadly summed up. The man who wrote that word upon the wall disappeared from the midst of the generations of man many centuries ago; the word, in its turn, has been effaced from the wall of the church; the church will, perhaps, itself soon disappear from the face of the earth.

It is upon this word that this book is founded.

March, 1831.

BOOK FIRST.
CHAPTER 1. THE GRAND HALL.
Three hundred and forty-eight years, six months, ~ ~


"Hunchback of Notre Dame"                 (V/GC/S/abT + "-ictor Hugo's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's writing"

"Hunchback of Notre Dame"                 (C/GC/S/abT + louds/C2)/Ch/+cp                  Clouds


1.
Preface                           (Sc/GC/S/abT + ene/C2)/Ch/+cp                           Scene

2.              <The> interior of <a> sleeping --- <A> few years ago

"few years ago"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "interior of sleeping"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "interior of sleeping"

3.
"while visiting or"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + apartment/C2)/Ch/+cp                  apartment

4.
rather                      (St/GC/S/abT + repsiades/C2)/Ch/+cp                      Strepsiades

5.
"rummaging about Notre"                 (Ph/GC/S/abT + idippides/C2)/Ch/+cp                  Phidippides

6.
Dame                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and two servants are in their beds"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and two servants are in their beds"

7.      <a> small house is seen at <a> distance --- <the> author of this book found

"author of this book found"                 (s/GC/S/abT + "-mall house is seen at distance"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "small house is seen at distance"

8.                in <an> obscure nook of one of <the> towers

"in obscure nook of one of towers"                 (T/GC/S/abT + ime/C2)/Ch/+cp                  Time

9.                    <the> following word

"following word"                    (m/GC/S/abT + idnight/C2)/Ch/+cp                    midnight

10.                    engraved by hand upon <the> wall

"engraved by hand upon wall"                 (St/GC/S/abT + "-repsiades (sitting up in his bed"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Strepsiades sitting up in his bed"

11.
"A N A r K H"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "Ah me! Ah me! O King Jupiter"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Ah me! Ah me! O King Jupiter"

12.                   of what <a> terrible length <the> nights are

"These Greek capitals"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "of what terrible length nights are"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "of what terrible length nights are"

13.
"black with age"                 (W/GC/S/abT + "ill it never be day"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Will it never be day"

14.               And yet long since I heard <the> cock --- and quite deeply graven in <the> stone

"and quite deeply graven in stone"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "And yet long since I heard cock"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "And yet long since I heard cock"

15.
"with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic caligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes"                 (My/GC/S/abT + "domestics are snoring"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "My domestics are snoring"

16. as though with <the> purpose of revealing that it had been <a> hand of <the> Middle Ages which had inscribed them there

"as though with purpose of revealing that it had been hand of Middle Ages which had inscribed them there"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut they would not have done so heretofore"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "but they would not have done so heretofore"

17.               and especially <the> fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them

"and especially fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them"                 (M/GC/S/abT + "-ay you perish then"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "May you perish then"

18.                    struck <the> author deeply

"struck author deeply"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "O war"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "O war"

19.
"He questioned himself"                 (F/GC/S/abT + "-or many reasons"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "For many reasons"

20. he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon <the> brow of <the> ancient church

"he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon brow of ancient church"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-ecause I may not even punish my domestics"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "because I may not even punish my domestics"

21.              Neither does this excellent youth awake through <the> night

Afterwards                 (N/GC/S/abT + "-either does this excellent youth awake through <the> night"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Neither does this excellent youth awake through <the> night"

22.               <the> wall was whitewashed or scraped down

"wall was whitewashed or scraped down"                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-ut takes his ease"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "but takes his ease"

23.
"I know not which"                 (wr/GC/S/abT + "-apped up in five blankets"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "wrapped up in five blankets"

24.               Well, if it is <the> fashion --- and <the> inscription disappeared

"and inscription disappeared"                 (W/GC/S/abT + "-ell, if it is fashion"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Well, if it is fashion"

25. For it is thus that people have been in <the> habit of proceeding with <the> marvellous churches of <the> Middle Ages for <the> last two hundred years

"For it is thus that people have been in habit of proceeding with marvellous churches of Middle Ages for last two hundred years"                 (l/GC/S/abT + "-et us snore wrapped up"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "let us snore wrapped up"

26.
"Mutilations come to them from every quarter"                 (L/GC/S/abT + "-ies down"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Lies down"

27.
"from within as well as from without"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and then almost immediately starts up again"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and then almost immediately starts up again"

28.                  <The> priest whitewashes them

"priest whitewashes them"                 (B/GC/S/abT + "-ut I am not able"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "But I am not able"

29.                  <the> archdeacon scrapes them down

"archdeacon scrapes them down"                 (m/GC/S/abT + "-iserable man"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "miserable man"

30.                 then <the> populace arrives and demolishes them

"then populace arrives and demolishes them"                 (t/GC/S/abT + "-o sleep"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "to sleep"

31.
Thus                 (b/GC/S/abT + "-eing tormented by my expenses"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "being tormented by my expenses"

32. with <the> exception of <the> fragile memory which <the> author of this book here consecrates to it

"with exception of fragile memory which author of this book here consecrates to it"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and my stud of horses"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and my stud of horses"

33.
"there remains to"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and my debts"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and my debts"

34.      day nothing whatever of <the> mysterious word engraved within <the> gloomy tower of Notre

"day nothing whatever of mysterious word engraved within gloomy tower of Notre"                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-rough this son of mine"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "through this son of mine"

35.
Dame                 (H/GC/S/abT + "-e with his long hair"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "He with his long hair"

36.                nothing of <the> destiny which it so sadly summed up

"nothing of destiny which it so sadly summed up"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "is riding horses and driving curricles"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "is riding horses and driving curricles"

37. <The> man who wrote that word upon <the> wall disappeared from <the> midst of <the> generations of man many centuries ago

"man who wrote that word upon wall disappeared from midst of generations of man many centuries ago"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and dreaming of horses"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and dreaming of horses"

38.                   <the> word

word                 (wh/GC/S/abT + "-ile I am driven to distraction"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "while I am driven to distraction"

39.                  as I see <the> moon bringing on <the> twentieths

"in its turn"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "as I see moon bringing on twentieths"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "as I see moon bringing on twentieths"

40.            for <the> interest is running on --- has been effaced from <the> wall of <the> church

"has been effaced from wall of church"                 (f/GC/S/abT + "-or interest is running on"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "for interest is running on"

41.               Boy! Light <a> lamp --- <the> church will

"church will"                 (B/GC/S/abT + "-oy! Light lamp"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Boy! Light lamp"

42.
perhaps                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and bring forth my tablets"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and bring forth my tablets"

43.                itself soon disappear from <the> face of <the> earth

"itself soon disappear from face of earth"                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-at I may take them and read to how many I am indebted"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "that I may take them and read to how many I am indebted"

44.                  and calculate <the> interest

"It is upon this word that this book is founded"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and calculate interest"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "and calculate interest"

45.              Enter boy with <a> light and tablets

March                 ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Enter boy with light and tablets"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Enter boy with light and tablets"

46.
"1831"                 (C/GC/S/abT + "-ome, let me see"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Come, let me see"

47.
"BOOK FIRST"                 (wh/GC/S/abT + "-at do I owe"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "what do I owe"

48.
"CHAPTER 1"                 (Tw/GC/S/abT + "-elve minae to Pasias"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Twelve minae to Pasias"

49.                    <THE> GRAND HALL

"GRAND HALL"                 ("Why t"/GC/S/abT + "-welve minae to Pasias"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Why twelve minae to Pasias"

50.
"Three hundred and forty"                 (Why/GC/S/abT + "did I borrow them"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Why did I borrow them"

51.              When I bought <the> blood

"eight years"                 (Wh/GC/S/abT + "-en I bought blood"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "When I bought blood"

52.
"six months"                 (h/GC/S/abT + "-orse. Ah me, unhappy"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "horse. Ah me, unhappy"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Victor Hugo's  "Notre-Dame de Paris (French)"    and     Aristophanes' "Eleven Comedies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/8688/pg8688.html ,  
Eleven Comedies

THE KNIGHTS

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas! Oh! woe! oh! woe! Miserable Paphlagonian![5] may the gods destroy both him and his cursed advice! Since that evil day when this new slave entered the house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows.

NICIAS. May the plague seize him, the arch-fiend—him and his lying tales!

DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow, what is your condition?

NICIAS. Very wretched, just like your own.

DEMOSTHENES. Then come, let us sing a duet of groans in the style of
Olympus.[6]

DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!

DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep! Enough of groaning! Let us consider how to save our pelts.

NICIAS. But how to do it! Can you suggest anything?

DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin. I cede you the honour.

NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I. Come, have courage! Speak, and then I will say what I think.

DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you!"[7]

NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with the pomp of
Euripides?

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me! Do not pelt me with those vegetables,[8] but find some way of leaving our master.

NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath.

DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt."

NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed!"

NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself; first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed![9]

NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you?

DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide.

NICIAS. How so?

DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades the skin when folk masturbate themselves.

NICIAS. The best thing we can do for the moment is to throw ourselves at the feet of the statue of some god.

DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods?

NICIAS. Certainly.

DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you?

NICIAS. The proof that they have taken a grudge against me. Is that not enough?

DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on. Do you consent to my telling the spectators of our troubles? ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19657/19657-h/19657-h.htm ,  
Notre-Dame de Paris (French)

PRÉFACE

Il y a quelques années qu'en visitant, ou, pour mieux dire, en furetant Notre-Dame, l'auteur de ce livre trouva, dans un recoin obscur de l'une des tours ce mot, gravé à la main sur le mur:

AΝΑΓΚΗ[1].

Ces majuscules grecques, noires de vétusté et assez profondément entaillées dans la pierre, je ne sais quels signes propres à la calligraphie gothique empreints dans leurs formes et dans leurs attitudes, comme pour révéler que c'était une main du moyen âge qui les avait écrites là, surtout le sens lugubre et fatal qu'elles renferment, frappèrent vivement l'auteur.

Il se demanda, il chercha à deviner quelle pouvait être l'âme en peine qui n'avait pas voulu quitter ce monde sans laisser ce stigmate de crime ou de malheur au front de la vieille église.

Depuis, on a badigeonné ou gratté (je ne sais plus lequel) le mur, et l'inscription a disparu. Car c'est ainsi qu'on agit depuis tantôt deux cents ans avec les merveilleuses églises du moyen âge. Les mutilations leur viennent de toutes parts, du dedans comme du dehors. Le prêtre les badigeonne, l'architecte les gratte, puis le peuple survient, qui les démolit.

Ainsi, hormis le fragile souvenir que lui consacre ici l'auteur de ce livre, il ne reste plus rien aujourd'hui du mot mystérieux gravé dans la sombre tour de Notre-Dame, rien de la destinée inconnue qu'il résumait si mélancoliquement. L'homme qui a écrit ce mot sur ce mur s'est effacé, il y a plusieurs siècles, du milieu des générations, le mot s'est à son tour effacé du mur de l'église, l'église elle-même s'effacera bientôt peut-être de la terre.

C'est sur ce mot qu'on a fait ce livre.

Février 1831.

LIVRE PREMIER

I

LA GRAND'SALLE

Il y a aujourd'hui trois cent quarante-huit ans six mois et dix-neuf jours que les Parisiens s'éveillèrent au bruit de toutes les cloches sonnant à grande volée dans la triple enceinte de la Cité, de l'Université et de la Ville. ~ ~
 

"Notre-Dame de Paris"                 (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

"Notre-Dame de Paris"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Eleven Comedies"


1.          <THE> KNIGHTS

PRÉFACE                          (K/S + NIGHTS/GC/S/abT)/+cp                         KNIGHTS

2.
"Il y a quelques années qu'en visitant"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.
ou                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.
"pour mieux dire"                 (M/S + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5.            may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice

"en furetant Notre"                 (m/S + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows

Dame                (S/S + "-ince that evil day when this new slave entered  house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.              NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him --- <l'>auteur de ce livre trouva

"auteur de ce livre trouva"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.                dans un recoin obscur de <l'>une des tours ce mot --- <the> arch

"dans un recoin obscur de une des tours ce mot"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + arch/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "arch"

9.                gravé à <la> main sur <le> mur

"gravé à main sur mur"                      (f/S + iend/GC/S/abT)/+cp                       fiend

10.
"A Ν Α Γ Κ Η"                 (h/S + "-im and his lying tales"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "him and his lying tales"

11.
"Ces majuscules grecques"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

12.               noires de vétusté et assez profondément entaillées dans <la> pierre

"noires de vétusté et assez profondément entaillées dans pierre"                 (wh/S + "-at is your condition"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "what is your condition"

13. je ne sais quels signes propres à <la> calligraphie gothique empreints dans leurs formes et dans leurs attitudes

"je ne sais quels signes propres à calligraphie gothique empreints dans leurs formes et dans leurs attitudes"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Very wretched"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Very wretched"

14.            comme pour révéler que c'était <une> main du moyen âge qui <les> avait écrites là

"comme pour révéler que c'était main du moyen âge qui avait écrites là"                 (j/S + "-ust like your own"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "just like your own"

15.               surtout <le> sens lugubre et fatal qu'elles renferment

"surtout sens lugubre et fatal qu'elles renferment"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Then come"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Then come"

16.      let us sing <a> duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus --- frappèrent vivement <l>'auteur

"frappèrent vivement auteur"                 (l/S + "-et us sing duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "let us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"

17.
"Il se demanda"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"

18. il chercha à deviner quelle pouvait être <l'>âme en peine qui n'avait pas voulu quitter ce monde sans laisser ce stigmate de crime ou de malheur au front de <la> vieille église

"il chercha à deviner quelle pouvait être âme en peine qui n'avait pas voulu quitter ce monde sans laisser ce stigmate de crime ou de malheur au front de vieille église"                 (D/S + "EMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"

19.
Depuis                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enough of groaning"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Enough of groaning"

20.
"on a badigeonné ou gratté"                 (L/S + "-et us consider how to save our pelts"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Let us consider how to save our pelts"

21.
"je ne sais plus lequel"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. But how to do it"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. But how to do it"

22.                <le> mur

mur                 (C/S + "-an you suggest anything"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Can you suggest anything"

23.                et <l'>inscription a disparu

"et inscription a disparu"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"

24. I cede you <the> honour --- Car c'est ainsi qu'on agit depuis tantôt deux cents ans avec <les> merveilleuses églises du moyen âge

"Car c'est ainsi qu'on agit depuis tantôt deux cents ans avec merveilleuses églises du moyen âge"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "I cede you honour"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "I cede you honour"

25.                  <Les> mutilations leur viennent de toutes parts

"mutilations leur viennent de toutes parts"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"

26.
"du dedans comme du dehors"                 (C/S + "-ome, have courage"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Come, have courage"

27.               <Le> prêtre <les> badigeonne

"prêtre badigeonne"                 (S/S + "-peak, and then I will say what I think"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Speak, and then I will say what I think"

28.                   <l'>architecte <les> gratte

"architecte gratte"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"

29. NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with <the> pomp of Euripides --- puis <le> peuple survient

"puis peuple survient"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"

30.                      qui <les> démolit

"qui démolit"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"

31.
Ainsi                 (D/S + "-o not pelt me with those vegetables"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Do not pelt me with those vegetables"

32.                  hormis <le> fragile souvenir que lui consacre ici <l'>auteur de ce livre

"hormis fragile souvenir que lui consacre ici auteur de ce livre"                 (b/S + "-ut find some way of leaving our master"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "but find some way of leaving our master"

33.       il ne reste plus rien aujourd'hui du mot mystérieux gravé dans <la> sombre tour de Notre

"il ne reste plus rien aujourd'hui du mot mystérieux gravé dans sombre tour de Notre"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"

34.
Dame                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"

35.             rien de <la> destinée inconnue qu'il résumait si mélancoliquement

"rien de destinée inconnue qu'il résumait si mélancoliquement"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"

36.                <L'>homme qui a écrit ce mot sur ce mur s'est effacé

"homme qui a écrit ce mot sur ce mur s'est effacé"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"

37.
"il y a plusieurs siècles"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"

38.
"du milieu des générations"                 (f/S + "-irst slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"

39.                   <le> mot s'est à son tour effacé du mur de <l'>église

"mot s'est à son tour effacé du mur de église"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"

40.                                 <l'>église elle

"église elle"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"

41.
"même s'effacera bientôt peut"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"

42.                    être de <la> terre

"être de terre"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. How so"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. How so"

43.    DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades <the> skin when folk masturbate themselves

"C'est sur ce mot qu'on a fait ce livre"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"

44. NICIAS. <The> best thing we can do for <the> moment is to throw ourselves at <the> feet of <the> statue of some god

"Février 1831"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"

45.
"LIVRE PREMIER"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"

46.
"I/un"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Certainly"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. Certainly"

47.                          <LA> GRAND'SALLE

"GRAND'SALLE"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. What proof have you"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you"

48.              NICIAS. <The> proof that they have taken <a> grudge against me

"Il y a aujourd'hui trois cent quarante"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. proof that they have taken grudge against me"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "NICIAS. proof that they have taken grudge against me"

49.
"huit ans six mois et dix"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Is that not enough"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Is that not enough"

50. neuf jours que <les> Parisiens s'éveillèrent au bruit de toutes <les> cloches sonnant à grande volée dans <la> triple enceinte de <la> Cité

"neuf jours que Parisiens s'éveillèrent au bruit de toutes cloches sonnant à grande volée dans triple enceinte de Cité"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"

51.   Do you consent to my telling <the> spectators of our troubles --- de <l'>Université et de <la> Ville

"de Université et de Ville"                 (D/S + "-o you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Do you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Victor Hugo's  "Notre-Dame de Paris (English)"    and     Aristophanes' "Eleven Comedies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2610/2610-h/2610-h.htm ,  
Notre-Dame De Paris

PREFACE.

A few years ago, while visiting or, rather, rummaging about Notre-Dame, the author of this book found, in an obscure nook of one of the towers, the following word, engraved by hand upon the wall:—

       ANArKH.

These Greek capitals, black with age, and quite deeply graven in the stone, with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic caligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes, as though with the purpose of revealing that it had been a hand of the Middle Ages which had inscribed them there, and especially the fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them, struck the author deeply.

He questioned himself; he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon the brow of the ancient church.

Afterwards, the wall was whitewashed or scraped down, I know not which, and the inscription disappeared. For it is thus that people have been in the habit of proceeding with the marvellous churches of the Middle Ages for the last two hundred years. Mutilations come to them from every quarter, from within as well as from without. The priest whitewashes them, the archdeacon scrapes them down; then the populace arrives and demolishes them.

Thus, with the exception of the fragile memory which the author of this book here consecrates to it, there remains to-day nothing whatever of the mysterious word engraved within the gloomy tower of Notre-Dame,—nothing of the destiny which it so sadly summed up. The man who wrote that word upon the wall disappeared from the midst of the generations of man many centuries ago; the word, in its turn, has been effaced from the wall of the church; the church will, perhaps, itself soon disappear from the face of the earth.

It is upon this word that this book is founded.

March, 1831.

VOLUME I.

BOOK FIRST.

CHAPTER I. THE GRAND HALL.

Three hundred and forty-eight years, six months, and nineteen days ago to-day, ~ ~


"Notre-Dame De Paris"                 (V/S + "-ictor Hugo's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Victor Hugo's work"

"Notre-Dame De Paris"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"


1.          <THE> KNIGHTS

PREFACE                          (K/S + NIGHTS/GC/S/abT)/+bp                         KNIGHTS

2.                  <A> few years ago

"few years ago"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.
"while visiting or"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.
rather                 (M/S + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5.            may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice

"rummaging about Notre"                 (m/S + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows

Dame                (S/S + "-ince that evil day when this new slave entered  house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.              NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him --- <the> author of this book found

"author of this book found"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.                 <the> arch --- in <an> obscure nook of one of <the> towers

"in obscure nook of one of towers"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + arch/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "arch"

9.                 <the> following word

"following word"                          (f/S + iend/GC/S/abT)/+bp                          fiend

10.                    engraved by hand upon <the> wall

"engraved by hand upon wall"                 (h/S + "-im and his lying tales"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "him and his lying tales"

11.
"A N A r K H"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

12.
"These Greek capitals"                 (wh/S + "-at is your condition"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "what is your condition"

13.
"black with age"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Very wretched"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Very wretched"

14.                   and quite deeply graven in <the> stone

"and quite deeply graven in stone"                 (j/S + "-ust like your own"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "just like your own"

15.
"with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic caligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Then come"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Then come"

16. let us sing <a> duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus --- as though with <the> purpose of revealing that it had been <a> hand of <the> Middle Ages which had inscribed them there

"as though with purpose of revealing that it had been hand of Middle Ages which had inscribed them there"                 (l/S + "-et us sing duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "let us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"

17.              and especially <the> fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them

"and especially fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"

18.                struck <the> author deeply

"struck author deeply"                 (D/S + "EMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"

19.
"He questioned himself"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enough of groaning"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Enough of groaning"

20. he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon <the> brow of <the> ancient church

"he sought to divine who could have been that soul in torment which had not been willing to quit this world without leaving this stigma of crime or unhappiness upon brow of ancient church"                 (L/S + "-et us consider how to save our pelts"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Let us consider how to save our pelts"

21.
Afterwards                  (N/S + "-ICIAS. But how to do it"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. But how to do it"

22.                    <the> wall was whitewashed or scraped down

"wall was whitewashed or scraped down"                 (C/S + "-an you suggest anything"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Can you suggest anything"

23.
"I know not which"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"

24.                 I cede you <the> honour --- and <the> inscription disappeared

"and <the> inscription disappeared"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "I cede you honour"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "I cede you honour"

25. For it is thus that people have been in <the> habit of proceeding with <the> marvellous churches of <the> Middle Ages for <the> last two hundred years

"For it is thus that people have been in habit of proceeding with marvellous churches of Middle Ages for last two hundred years"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"

26.
"du dedans comme du dehors"                 (C/S + "-ome, have courage"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Come, have courage"

27.
"Mutilations come to them from every quarter"                 (S/S + "-peak, and then I will say what I think"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Speak, and then I will say what I think"

28.
"from within as well as from without"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"

29. NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with <the> pomp of Euripides --- <The> priest whitewashes them

"priest whitewashes them"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"

30.                <the> archdeacon scrapes them down

"archdeacon scrapes them down"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"

31. then <the> populace arrives and demolishes them

"then populace arrives and demolishes them"                 (D/S + "-o not pelt me with those vegetables"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Do not pelt me with those vegetables"

32.
Thus                 (b/S + "-ut find some way of leaving our master"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "but find some way of leaving our master"

33.      with <the> exception of <the> fragile memory which <the> author of this book here consecrates to it

"with exception of fragile memory which author of this book here consecrates to it"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"

34.
"there remains to"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"

35.        day nothing whatever of <the> mysterious word engraved within <the> gloomy tower of Notre

"day nothing whatever of mysterious word engraved within gloomy tower of Notre"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"

36.
Dame                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"

37.                  nothing of <the> destiny which it so sadly summed up

"nothing of destiny which it so sadly summed up"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"

38. <The> man who wrote that word upon <the> wall disappeared from <the> midst of <the> generations of man many centuries ago

"man who wrote that word upon wall disappeared from midst of generations of man many centuries ago"                 (f/S + "-irst slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"

39.                    <the> word

word                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"

40.
"in its turn"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"

41.                has been effaced from <the> wall of <the> church

"has been effaced from wall of church"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"

42.                         <the> church will

"church will"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. How so"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. How so"

43.    DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades <the> skin when folk masturbate themselves

perhaps                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"

44. NICIAS. <The> best thing we can do for <the> moment is to throw ourselves at <the> feet of <the> statue of some god --- itself soon disappear from <the> face of <the> earth

"itself soon disappear from <the> face of <the> earth"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"

45.
"It is upon this word that this book is founded"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"

46.
March                  (N/S + "-ICIAS. Certainly"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Certainly"

47.
"1831"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. What proof have you"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you"

48.              NICIAS. <The> proof that they have taken <a> grudge against me

"VOLUME I"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. proof that they have taken grudge against me"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. proof that they have taken grudge against me"

49.
"BOOK FIRST"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Is that not enough"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Is that not enough"

50.
"CHAPTER I"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"

51.   Do you consent to my telling <the> spectators of our troubles --- <THE> GRAND HALL

"GRAND HALL"                 (D/S + "-o you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Do you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"

52.
"Three hundred and forty"                 (N/S + "-ICIAS. 'Twould not be amiss"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. 'Twould not be amiss"

53.
"eight years"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "and we might ask them to show us by their manner"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "and we might ask them to show us by their manner"

54.
"six months"                 (wh/S + "-ether our facts and actions are to their liking"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "whether our facts and actions are to their liking"

55.
"and nineteen days ago to"                 (D/S + "-EMOSTHENES. I will begin then"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. I will begin then"

56.                 We have <a> very brutal master

day                  (W/S + "-e have very brutal master"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "We have very brutal master"

Et cetera.



Alphonse de Lamartine
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Alphonse+de+Lamartine ,  

*               Aristophanes  >>  ("Victor Hugo" /P/Ch)/S  >>  ("Alphonse de Lamartine" /T/Ch)/S

* ("Alphonse de Lamartine" /T/Ch)/S  >>  Lamartine /P  >>  "Alphonse Marie Louis de Prat de Lamartine" /S

Alphonse Marie Louis de Prat de Lamartine
Born                   21 October 1790(1790-10-21)              Mâcon, Burgundy, France
Died                   28 January 1869 (aged 78)                            Paris, France

"1790"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/P)/+bp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
October                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/P)/+cp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
"21"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/P)/Ch/+bp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
"Mâcon, Burgundy, France"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/P)/Ch/+cp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"

"1869"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/T)/+bp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
January                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/T)/+cp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
"28"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/T) /Ch/+bp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"
"Paris, France"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine"/P)/Ch/+cp               "Alphonse de Lamartine"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/l#a4781 ,  
•  Atheism Among the People (English) (as Author)

"Atheism Among People"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1" & "The Eleven Comedies, Volume 2"

"Atheism Among People"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/P)                   "Eleven Comedies"

•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 1)
Un Entretien par Mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 3)
Un Entretien par Mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 4)
Un Entretien par Mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 5)
Un Entretien par Mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 6)
Un Entretien par Mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 8)
Un entretien par mois (French) (as Author)
•  Cours Familier de Littérature (Volume 9)
Un entretien par mois (French) (as Author)

"Cours Familier de Littérature"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/Ch                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Aristophane; Traduction nouvelle, Tome premier" & "Aristophane; Traduction nouvelle, tome second"

"Cours Familier de Littérature"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + Aristophane/P)/Ch                  Aristophane

•  History of the Girondists, Volume I
Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution (English) (as Author)

"History of Girondists, Volume I"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Personal Memoirs of Patriots of French Revolution"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+bp                  "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

"Personal Memoirs of Patriots of French Revolution"                   (Ly/S + sistrata/P)/+bp                  Lysistrata

•  El Manuscrito de mi madre
aumentado con las comentarios, prólogo y epílogo (Spanish) (as Author)

"Manuscrito de mi madre"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/S)                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"Manuscrito de mi madre"                            (B/C2 + irds/S)                          Birds

•  Raphael
Pages of the Book of Life at Twenty (English) (as Author)

Raphael                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+bp/Ch                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Pages of Book of Life at Twenty"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Pages of Book of Life at Twenty"                    (Fr/S + ogs/P)/+cp/Ch                   Frogs



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Alphonse de Lamartine's  "Atheism Among the People"    and     Aristophanes' "Eleven Comedies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/8688/pg8688.html ,  
Eleven Comedies

THE KNIGHTS

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas! Oh! woe! oh! woe! Miserable Paphlagonian![5] may the gods destroy both him and his cursed advice! Since that evil day when this new slave entered the house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows.

NICIAS. May the plague seize him, the arch-fiend—him and his lying tales!

DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow, what is your condition?

NICIAS. Very wretched, just like your own.

DEMOSTHENES. Then come, let us sing a duet of groans in the style of
Olympus.[6]

DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!

DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep! Enough of groaning! Let us consider how to save our pelts.

NICIAS. But how to do it! Can you suggest anything?

DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin. I cede you the honour.

NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I. Come, have courage! Speak, and then I will say what I think.

DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you!"[7]

NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with the pomp of
Euripides?

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me! Do not pelt me with those vegetables,[8] but find some way of leaving our master.

NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath.

DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt."

NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed!"

NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself; first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed![9]

NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you?

DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide.

NICIAS. How so?

DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades the skin when folk masturbate themselves.

NICIAS. The best thing we can do for the moment is to throw ourselves at the feet of the statue of some god.

DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods?

NICIAS. Certainly.

DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you?

NICIAS. The proof that they have taken a grudge against me. Is that not enough?

DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on. Do you consent to my telling the spectators of our troubles? ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/25339/25339-h/25339-h.htm ,  
Atheism Among the People

I.

I have often asked myself, “Why am I a Republican?—Why am I the partizan of equitable Democracy, organized and established as a good and strong Government?—Why have I a real love of the People—a love always serious, and sometimes even tender?—What has the People done for me? I was not born in the ranks of the People. I was born between the high Aristocracy and what was then called the inferior classes, in the days when there were classes, where are now equal citizens in various callings. I never starved in the People’s famine; I never groaned, personally, in the People’s miseries; I never sweat with its sweat; I was never benumbed with its cold. Why then, I repeat it, do I hunger in its hunger, thirst with its thirst, warm under its sun, freeze under its cold, grieve under its sorrows? Why should I not care for it as little as for that which passes at the antipodes?—turn away my eyes, close my ears, think of other things, and wrap myself up in that soft, thick garment of indifference and egotism, in which I can shelter myself, and indulge my separate personal tastes, without asking whether, below me,—in street, garret, or cottage, there is a rich People, or a beggar People; a religious People, or an atheistic People; a People of idlers, or of workers;  
a People of Helots, or of citizens?”

And whenever I have thus questioned myself, I have thus answered myself:—“I love the people because I believe in God. For, if I did not believe in God, what would the people be to me? I should enjoy at ease that lucky throw of the dice, which chance had turned up for me, the day of my birth; ~ ~


"Atheism Among People"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Atheism Among People"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/P)                   "Eleven Comedies"


1.          <THE> KNIGHTS

"I/one"                               (K/C2 + NIGHTS/P)                                  KNIGHTS

2.
"I have often asked myself"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.                  Why am I <a> Republican

"Why am I Republican"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/P)                   "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.                Why am I <the> partizan of equitable Democracy

"Why am I partizan of equitable Democracy"                     (M/C2 + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/P)                   "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5. may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice --- organized and established as <a> good and strong Government

"organized and established as good and strong Government"                     (m/C2 + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/P)                   "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows --- Why have I <a> real love of <the> People

"Why have I real love of People"                     (S/C2 + "-ince that evil day when this new slave entered  house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/P)                   "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.              NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him --- <a> love always serious

"love always serious"                     (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/P)                   "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.                 <the> arch

"and sometimes even tender"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + arch/P)                   arch

9.                   What has <the> People done for me

"What has People done for me"                         (f/C2 + iend/P)                        fiend

10.                   I was not born in <the> ranks of <the> People

"I was not born in ranks of People"                     (h/C2 + "-im and his lying tales"/P)                   "him and his lying tales"

11.       I was born between <the> high Aristocracy and what was then called <the> inferior classes

"I was born between high Aristocracy and what was then called inferior classes"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

12.                    in <the> days when there were classes

"in days when there were classes"                     (wh/C2 + "-at is your condition"/P)                   "what is your condition"

13.
"where are now equal citizens in various callings"                     (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Very wretched"/P)                   "NICIAS. Very wretched"

14.                   I never starved in <the> People’s famine

"I never starved in People’s famine"                     (j/C2 + "-ust like your own"/P)                   "just like your own"

15.
"I never groaned"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Then come"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Then come"

16.                     let us sing <a> duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus

personally                     (l/C2 + "-et us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"/P)                   "let us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"

17.               in <the> People’s miseries

"in People’s miseries"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"/P)                   " DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!"

18.
"I never sweat with its sweat"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"

19.
"I was never benumbed with its cold"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enough of groaning"/P)                   "Enough of groaning"

20.
"Why then"                     (L/C2 + "-et us consider how to save our pelts"/P)                   "Let us consider how to save our pelts"

21.
"I repeat it"                     (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. But how to do it"/P)                   "NICIAS. But how to do it"

22.
"do I hunger in its hunger"                     (C/C2 + "-an you suggest anything"/P)                   "Can you suggest anything"

23.
"thirst with its thirst"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"

24.                 I cede you <the> honour

"warm under its sun"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I cede you honour"/P)                 "I cede you honour"

25.
"freeze under its cold"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"/P)                   "NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"

26.
"grieve under its sorrows"                     (C/C2 + "-ome, have courage"/P)                   "Come, have courage"

27.          Why should I not care for it as little as for that which passes at <the> antipodes

"Why should I not care for it as little as for that which passes at antipodes"                 (S/C2 + "-peak, and then I will say what I think"/P)                   "Speak, and then I will say what I think"

28.
"turn away my eyes"                  (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"/P)                 "DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"

29.           NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with <the> pomp of Euripides

"close my ears"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"/P)                   "NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with pomp of Euripides"

30.
"think of other things"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me"

31.
"and wrap myself up in that soft"                     (D/C2 + "-o not pelt me with those vegetables"/P)                   "Do not pelt me with those vegetables"

32.
"thick garment of indifference and egotism"                   (b/C2 + "-ut find some way of leaving our master"/P)                   "but find some way of leaving our master"

33.
"in which I can shelter myself"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"/P)                  "NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath"

34.
"and indulge my separate personal tastes"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt"

35.
"without asking whether"                     (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"/P)                   "NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed"

36.
"below me"                  (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed"

37.
"in street"                  (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"/P)                 "NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself"

38.
garret                  (f/C2 + "-irst slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"/P)                   "first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed"

39.
"or cottage"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed"

40.                     there is <a> rich People

"there is rich People"                 (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"/P)                   "NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you"

41.                     or <a> beggar People

"or beggar People"                  (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"/P)                  "DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide"

42.                     <a> religious People

"religious People"                     (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. How so"/P)                   "NICIAS. How so"

43. DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades <the> skin when folk masturbate themselves --- or <an> atheistic People

"or atheistic People"                  (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"/P)                "DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades skin when folk masturbate themselves"

44. NICIAS. <The> best thing we can do for <the> moment is to throw ourselves at <the> feet of <the> statue of some god --- <a> People of idlers

"People of idlers"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"/P)                   "NICIAS. best thing we can do for moment is to throw ourselves at feet of statue of some god"

45.
"or of workers"                  (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"/P)                  "DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods"

46.                    <a> People of Helots

"People of Helots"                  (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Certainly"/P)                 "NICIAS. Certainly"

47.
"or of citizens"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. What proof have you"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you"

48.              NICIAS. <The> proof that they have taken <a> grudge against me

"And whenever I have thus questioned myself"                  (N/C2 + "-ICIAS proof that they have taken grudge against me"/P)                 "NICIAS proof that they have taken grudge against me"

49.
"I have thus answered myself"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Is that not enough"/P)                  "Is that not enough"

50.                   I love <the> people because I believe in God

"I love people because I believe in God"                     (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on"

51.               Do you consent to my telling <the> spectators of our troubles

For                  (D/C2 + "-o you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"/P)                   "Do you consent to my telling spectators of our troubles"

52.
"if I did not believe in God"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. 'Twould not be amiss"/P)                   "NICIAS. 'Twould not be amiss"

53.                    what would <the> people be to me

"what would people be to me"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and we might ask them to show us by their manner"/P)                   "and we might ask them to show us by their manner"

54.                  I should enjoy at ease that lucky throw of <the> dice

"I should enjoy at ease that lucky throw of dice"                     (wh/C2 + "-ether our facts and actions are to their liking"/P)                   "whether our facts and actions are to their liking"

55.
"which chance had turned up for me"                    (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. I will begin then"/P)                   "DEMOSTHENES. I will begin then"

56.                 We have <a> very brutal master --- <the> day of my birth

"day of my birth"                     (W/C2 + "-e have very brutal master"/P)                   "We have very brutal master"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Alphonse de Lamartine's  "History of the Girondists, Volume I"   (or  "Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution")    and     Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7700/7700-h/7700-h.htm ,  
Lysistrata

LYSISTRATA stands alone with the Propylaea at her back.

LYSISTRATA

If they were trysting for a Bacchanal,
A feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis,
The tambourines would block the rowdy streets,
But now there's not a woman to be seen
Except--ah, yes--this neighbour of mine yonder.

Enter CALONICE.

Good day Calonice.

CALONICE

Good day Lysistrata.
But what has vexed you so? Tell me, child. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18094/18094-h/18094-h.htm ,  
History of the Girondists, Volume I
Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution
FROM UNPUBLISHED SOURCES
BY ALPHONSE DE LAMARTINE
Author of "Travels in the Holy Land," &(N)c

IN THREE VOLUMES.
VOL. I.

Robespierre

ADVERTISEMENT.

We have not thought it necessary to preface this recital by any introduction of the preceding epochs of the Revolution.

We have not re-produced, with the minute elaboration of an annalist, the numerous parliamentary and military details of all the events of these forty months. Two or three times we have, in order to group men and circumstances in masses, made unimportant anachronisms. ~ ~


"History of Girondists, Volume I"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+cp                  "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Personal Memoirs of Patriots of French Revolution"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+bp                  "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Personal Memoirs of Patriots of French Revolution"                   (Ly/S + sistrata/P)/+bp                  Lysistrata

"FROM UNPUBLISHED SOURCES"                   (Ly/S + sistrata/P)/Ch/+bp                  Lysistrata

"BY ALPHONSE DE LAMARTINE"                   (Ly/S + sistrata/P)/+cp                  Lysistrata

"Author of "Travels in Holy Land," &(N)c"                   (Ly/S + sistrata/P)/Ch/+cp                  Lysistrata


1.             LYSISTRATA stands alone with <the> Propylaea at her back

"IN THREE VOLUMES"                   (LY/S + "-SISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"/P)/+bp                  "LYSISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"

2.             LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for <a> Bacchanal

"V O L"                   (LY/S + "-SISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"/P)/+bp                  "LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"

3.            <A> feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis

"I (i)"                   (f/S + "-east of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"/P)/+bp                  "feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"

4.             <The> tambourines would block <the> rowdy streets

Robespierre                   (t/S + "-ambourines would block rowdy streets"/P)/+bp                  "tambourines would block rowdy streets"

ADVERTISEMENT                   (t/S + "-ambourines would block rowdy streets"/P)/Ch/+bp                  "tambourines would block rowdy streets"

5. But now there's not <a> woman to be seen Except --- We have not thought it necessary to preface this recital by any introduction of <the> preceding epochs of <the> Revolution

"We have not thought it necessary to preface this recital by any introduction of preceding epochs of Revolution"                   (B/S + "-ut now there's not woman to be seen Except"/P)/+bp                  "But now there's not woman to be seen Except"

6.
"We have not re"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "ah, yes"/P)/+bp                    "ah, yes"

7.
produced                   (th/S + "-is neighbour of mine yonder"/P)/+bp                  "this neighbour of mine yonder"

8.                      with <the> minute elaboration of <an> annalist

"with minute elaboration of annalist"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter CALONICE"/P)/+bp                  "Enter CALONICE"

9. <the> numerous parliamentary and military details of all <the> events of these forty months

"numerous parliamentary and military details of all events of these forty months"                   (G/S + "-ood day Calonice"/P)/+bp                  "Good day Calonice"

10.
"Two or three times we have"                   (C/S + "-ALONICE Good day Lysistrata"/P)/+bp                  "CALONICE Good day Lysistrata"

11.
"in order to group men and circumstances in masses"                   (B/S + "-ut what has vexed you so"/P)/+bp                  "But what has vexed you so"

12.
"made unimportant anachronisms"                   (T/S + "-ell me, child"/P)/+bp                  "Tell me, child"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Alphonse de Lamartine's  "Raphael"   (or  "Pages of the Book of Life at Twenty")    and     Aristophanes' "The Frogs"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/7998/pg7998.html ,    
The Frogs

A CHORUS OF FROGS
A CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS

_Attendants at a Funeral;

Women worshipping Iacchus;

Servants of Pluto, &c._

Xanthias

Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master,
At which the audience never fail to laugh?

DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will, except I'm getting crushed: Fight shy of that: I'm sick of that already.

XAN. Nothing else smart?

DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching.

XAN. Come now, that comical joke?

DIO. With all my heart. Only be careful not to shift your pole,
And—

XAN. What?

DIO. And vow that you've a bellyache.

XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened so
That if none ease me, I must ease myself? ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/13019/pg13019.html ,    
Raphael
Pages of the Book of Life at Twenty

I.

There are places and climates, seasons and hours, with their outward circumstance, so much in harmony with certain impressions of the heart, that Nature and the soul of man appear to be parts of one vast whole; and if we separate the stage from the drama, or the drama from the stage, the whole scene fades, and the feeling vanishes. If we take from René the cliffs of Brittany, or the wild savannahs from Atala, the mists of Swabia from Werther, or the sunny waves and scorched-up hills from Paul and Virginia, we can neither understand Chateaubriand, Bernardin de St. Pierre, or Goethe. ~ ~


Raphael                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+bp/Ch                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

"Pages of Book of Life at Twenty"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Alphonse de Lamartine's writing"

Raphael                               (Fr/S + ogs/P)/+bp/Ch                                 Frogs

"Pages of Book of Life at Twenty"                    (Fr/S + ogs/P)/+cp/Ch                   Frogs


1.           <A> CHORUS OF FROGS <A> CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS

"I (i)"                    (CH/S + "-ORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "CHORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"

2.                    Attendants at <a> Funeral

"There are places and climates"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Attendants at Funeral"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Attendants at Funeral"

3.
"seasons and hours"                    (W/S + "omen worshipping Iacchus"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Women worshipping Iacchus"

4.
"with their outward circumstance"                    (S/S + "-ervants of Pluto, &/N c"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Servants of Pluto, &/N c"

5.             so much in harmony with certain impressions of <the> heart

"so much in harmony with certain impressions of heart"                    (X/S + "-anthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Xanthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"

6. At which <the> audience never fail to laugh --- that Nature and <the> soul of man appear to be parts of one vast whole

"that Nature and soul of man appear to be parts of one vast whole"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "At which audience never fail to laugh"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "At which audience never fail to laugh"

7.                    and if we separate <the> stage from <the> drama

"and if we separate stage from drama"                    (D/S + "-IONYSUS. Aye, what you will"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will"

8.                      or <the> drama from <the> stage

"or drama from stage"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "except I'm getting crushed"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "except I'm getting crushed"

9.                     <the> whole scene fades

"whole scene fades"                    (F/S + "-ight shy of that"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Fight shy of that"

10.                   and <the> feeling vanishes

"and feeling vanishes"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "I'm sick of that already"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "I'm sick of that already"

11.                  If we take from René <the> cliffs of Brittany

"If we take from René cliffs of Brittany"                    (X/S + "-AN. Nothing else smart"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "XAN. Nothing else smart"

12.                   or <the> wild savannahs from Atala

"or wild savannahs from Atala"                    (D/S + "-IO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"

13.                   <the> mists of Swabia from Werther

"mists of Swabia from Werther"                    (X/S + "-AN. Come now, that comical joke"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "XAN. Come now, that comical joke"

14.                   or <the> sunny waves and scorched

"or sunny waves and scorched"                    (D/S + "-IO. With all my heart"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "DIO. With all my heart"

15.
"up hills from Paul and Virginia"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"

16.
"we can neither understand Chateaubriand"                    (X/S + "-AN. What"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "XAN. What"

17.                      DIO. And vow that you've <a> bellyache

"Bernardin de S t"                    (D/S + "-IO. And vow that you've bellyache"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "DIO. And vow that you've bellyache"

18.
Pierre                    (X/S + "-AN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"

19.
"or Goethe"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "I must ease myself"/P)/+cp/Ch                   "I must ease myself"

Et cetera.



Heinrich Heine
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Heinrich+Heine ,  

* Aristophanes  >>  ("Victor Hugo" /P/Ch)/S  >>  ("Alphonse de Lamartine" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Heinrich Heine" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S

*   ("Heinrich Heine" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  Heine /C2/Ch >>  "Christian Johann Heinrich Heine" /P

Christian Johann Heinrich Heine
Born                       13 December 1797                            Düsseldorf
Died                    17 February 1856 (aged 58)                      Paris, France

"1797"                       (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/S)/+bp                       "Heinrich Heine"
December                     (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/S)/+cp                      "Heinrich Heine"
"13"                       (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/S)/Ch/+bp                      "Heinrich Heine"
Düsseldor                  (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/S)/Ch/+cp                      "Heinrich Heine"

"1856"                       (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/C2)/+bp                      "Heinrich Heine"
February                     (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/C2)/+cp                      "Heinrich Heine"
"17"                      (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/C2)/Ch/+bp                      "Heinrich Heine"
"Paris, France"                  (H/T + "-einrich Heine"/C2)/Ch/+cp                "Heinrich Heine"

>>                  He was called "Harry" as a child,

*   ("Heinrich Heine" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S  >>  Heine /C2/Ch >>  "Christian Johann Heinrich Heine" /P  >>  Harry /GC/S/abT/Ch

>>                  Ferdinand Freiligrath and Georg Herwegh

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Ferdinand+Freiligrath ,  
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Georg+Herwegh ,  

"Ferdinand Freiligrath"                     (H/P "-einrich Heine"/C2)/Ch                      "Heinrich Heine"
"Georg Herwegh"                     (H/P "-einrich Heine"/C2)/Ch                      "Heinrich Heine"

>>        Karl Marx

"Karl Marx"                       (H/P "-einrich Heine"/T)/Ch                       "Heinrich Heine"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/h#a1049 ,      
•  Aikarunoja (Finnish) (as Author)

Aikarunoja                     (H/T + "-einrich Heine's writing"/C2)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

Aikarunoja                                  (B/T + irds/C2)/Ch                                Birds

•  Atta Troll (English) (as Author)

"Atta Troll"                     (H/P + "-einrich Heine's writing"/C2)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Lysistrata

"Atta Troll"                             (Lys/P + istrata/C2)/Ch                            Lysistrata

•  De Beurs Lacht (Dutch) (as Author)

"Beurs Lacht"                     (H/T + "-einrich Heine's writing"/C2)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Peace

"Beurs Lacht"                               (P/T + eace/C2)/Ch                               Peace

•  Buch der Lieder (German) (as Author)

"Buch der Lieder"                     (H/P + "-einrich Heine's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

"Buch der Lieder"                     (Cl/P + ouds/GC/S/abT)/Ch                     Clouds

•  Deutschland. Ein Wintermärchen (German) (as Author)

"Deutschland. Wintermärchen"                     (H/S + "-einrich Heine's writing"/P)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Acharnians

"Deutschland. Wintermärchen"                     ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Acharnians/P)/Ch                     Acharnians



•  De Franse Pers (Dutch) (as Author)

"Franse Pers"                     (H/C2 + "-einrich Heine's writing"/T)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

"Franse Pers"                              (C/C2 + louds/T)/Ch                              Clouds

•  Franse Toestanden (Dutch) (as Author)

"Franse Toestanden"                     (H/S + "-einrich Heine's writing"/C2)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Lysistrata

"Franse Toestanden"                        (Ly/S + sistrata/C2)/Ch                       Lysistrata

•  The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 06
Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes (English) (as Contributor)

"German Classics of Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 06"                     (H/S + "-einrich Heine's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

"Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes"                     (H/S + "-einrich Heine's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1/2

"Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. in Twenty Volumes"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+cp/Ch                     "Eleven Comedies"

•  Die Harzreise (German) (as Author)

Harzreise                     (H/C2 + "-einrich Heine's writing"/T)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

Harzreise                                   (C/C2 + louds/T)/Ch                            Clouds

•  Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine (English) (as Author)

"Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine"                     (H/S + "-einrich Heine's writing"/P)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Poems and Ballads of Heinrich Heine"                     (Fr/S + ogs/P)/Ch                      Frogs

•  Romanzero (German) (as Author)

Romanzero                    (H/P + "-einrich Heine's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

Romanzero                    (Fr/P + ogs/GC/S/abT)/+cp/Ch                     Frogs

•  Runoelmia (Finnish) (as Author)

Runoelmia                   (H/C2 + "-einrich Heine's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

Runoelmia                             (B/C2 + irds/GC/S/abT)/Ch                             Birds

•  Valikoima runoelmia (Finnish) (as Author)

"Valikoima runoelmia"                   (H/GC/S/abT + "-einrich Heine's writing"/S)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"Valikoima runoelmia"                       (B/GC/S/abT + irds/S)/Ch                         Birds



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   Heinrich Heine's  "Aikarunoja"  and     Aristophanes' "The Birds"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3013/3013-h/3013-h.htm ,  
The Birds

SCENE: A wild, desolate tract of open country; broken rocks and brushwood occupy the centre of the stage.

EUELPIDES (TO HIS JAY)(1) Do you think I should walk straight for yon tree?

f(1) Euelpides is holding a jay and Pisthetaerus a crow; they are the guides who are to lead them to the kingdom of the birds.

PISTHETAERUS (TO HIS CROW) Cursed beast, what are you croaking to me?... to retrace my steps?

EUELPIDES Why, you wretch, we are wandering at random, we are exerting ourselves only to return to the same spot; 'tis labour lost.

PISTHETAERUS To think that I should trust to this crow, which has made me cover more than a thousand furlongs!

EUELPIDES And that I to this jay, which has torn every nail from my fingers! ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/29126/pg29126.html ,  
Aikarunoja

TIEDETTÄ.

Lyö'ös rumpua rohkeesti, taistottarelle suukko suo, siinä on kaikki tieteily, siinä kirjojen oppi tuo.
Rummuta ihmiset unestaan, huomenkelloja soittele. Nuoruusvoimin eteenpäin astu, korkein tiede se.
Hegelin on se tiedettä, siin' on kirjojen viisaus. — Tajusin, kosk' olen älykäs ja mulla soittohon taipumus.

KEHITYSTÄ. ~ ~
 

Aikarunoja                     (H/T + "-einrich Heine's writing"/C2)/Ch                     "Heinrich Heine's writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

Aikarunoja                                  (B/T + irds/C2)/Ch                                Birds


1.
TIEDETTÄ                                 (SC/T + ENE/C2)/Ch                               SCENE

2.                   <A> wild, desolate tract of open country

" Lyö'ös rumpua rohkeesti"                  (w/T + "-ild, desolate tract of open country"/C2)/Ch                   "wild, desolate tract of open country"

3.              broken rocks and brushwood occupy <the> centre of <the> stage

"taistottarelle suukko suo"                  (br/T + "-oken rocks and brushwood occupy centre of stage"/C2)/Ch                   "broken rocks and brushwood occupy centre of stage"

4.
"siinä on kaikki tieteily"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "EUELPIDES (TO HIS JAY) Do you think I should walk straight for yon tree"/C2)/Ch                   "EUELPIDES (TO HIS JAY) Do you think I should walk straight for yon tree"

5.             f Euelpides is holding <a> jay and Pisthetaerus <a> crow

"siinä kirjojen oppi tuo"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "f Euelpides is holding jay and Pisthetaerus crow"/C2)/Ch                   "f Euelpides is holding jay and Pisthetaerus crow"

6.                they are <the> guides who are to lead them to <the> kingdom of <the> birds

"Rummuta ihmiset unestaan"                  (th/T + "-ey are guides who are to lead them to kingdom of birds"/C2)/Ch                   "they are guides who are to lead them to kingdom of birds"

7.
"huomenkelloja soittele"                  (P/T + "-ISTHETAERUS (TO HIS CROW) Cursed beast, what are you croaking to me"/C2)/Ch                   "PISTHETAERUS (TO HIS CROW) Cursed beast, what are you croaking to me"

8.
"Nuoruusvoimin eteenpäin astu"                  (t/T + "-o retrace my steps"/C2)/Ch                   "to retrace my steps"

9.
"korkein tiede se"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "EUELPIDES Why, you wretch, we are wandering at random"/C2)/Ch                   "EUELPIDES Why, you wretch, we are wandering at random"

10.               we are exerting ourselves only to return to <the> same spot

"Hegelin on se tiedettä"                  (w/T + "-e are exerting ourselves only to return to same spot "/C2)/Ch                   "we are exerting ourselves only to return to same spot"

11.
"siin' on kirjojen viisaus"                  ('t /T + "-is labour lost"/C2)/Ch                   "'tis labour lost"

12.
Tajusin                  (P/T + "-ISTHETAERUS To think that I should trust to this crow"/C2)/Ch                   "PISTHETAERUS To think that I should trust to this crow"

13.                  which has made me cover more than <a> thousand furlongs

"kosk' olen älykäs ja mulla soittohon taipumus"                  (wh/T + "-ich has made me cover more than thousand furlongs"/C2)/Ch                   "which has made me cover more than thousand furlongs"

14.
KEHITYSTÄ                  ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "EUELPIDES And that I to this jay, which has torn every nail from my fingers"/C2)/Ch                   "EUELPIDES And that I to this jay, which has torn every nail from my fingers"

Et cetera.



Karl Marx
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Karl+Marx ,  

"Karl Marx"                       (H/P "-einrich Heine"/T)/Ch                       "Heinrich Heine"

*       "Karl Marx"  >>  Marx /P  >>  "Karl Heinrich Marx" /S


Full name                       Karl Heinrich Marx
Born                               May 5, 1818                           Trier, Kingdom of Prussia
Died                        March 14, 1883 (aged 64)                     London, United Kingdom

"1818"                         (K/T + "-arl Marx"/S)/+bp                               "Karl Marx"
May                            (K/T + "-arl Marx"/S)/+cp                               "Karl Marx"
"5"                            (K/T + "-arl Marx"/S)/Ch/+bp                            "Karl Marx"
"Trier, Kingdom of Prussia"                   (K/T + "-arl Marx"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Karl Marx"

"1883"                           (K/P + "-arl Marx"/S)/+bp                             "Karl Marx"
March                            (K/P + "-arl Marx"/S)/+cp                             "Karl Marx"
"14"                           (K/P + "-arl Marx"/S)/Ch/+bp                            "Karl Marx"
"London, United Kingdom"                 (K/P + "-arl Marx"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Karl Marx"

>>              stateless, classless society called pure communism

communism                     (cl/P + "-assless society"/C2)/Ch                   "classless society"

stateless                               (cl/P + assless/C1)/Ch                            classless

>>                  "dictatorship of the proletariat"

*                  communism  >>  ("dictatorship of proletariat" /C2)/GC/S/abT

>>                      proletariat

proletariat                               (w/P + orkers/T)/Ch                               workers


>>                            capitalism

capitalism                               (c/GC/S/abT + lass/C2)/Ch                            class

>>                           bourgeoisie

*                     capitalism  >>  (bourgeoisie /C2)/GC/S/abT

>>                         Marxism

Marxism                             (c/S + communism/P)/Ch                         communism

>>                          Bolsheviks

Bolsheviks                          (L/GC/S/abT + enin/T)/Ch                             Lenin

>>                          Mensheviks

*                      "Julius Martov"  >>  (Mensheviks /P/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>                  Émile Durkheim and Max Weber

"Émile Durkheim"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx"/P)/Ch/+bp                    "Karl Marx"

"Max Weber"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx"/P)/Ch/+cp                    "Karl Marx"

>>                    three principal architects of modern social science

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("three principal architects of modern social science" /P/Ch)/C1
*           "Émile Durkheim"  >>  ("three principal architects of modern social science" /P/Ch)/C1
*           "Max Weber"  >>  ("three principal architects of modern social science" /P/Ch)/C1

>>    In 1999, a BBC poll revealed that Marx had been voted the "thinker of the millennium" by people from around the world

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("thinker of millennium" /C1/Ch)/P

>>                    Friedrich Engels

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Friedrich Engels" /T/Ch)/C2

>>                  Wilhelm Wolff
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wilhelm+Wolff ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Wilhelm Wolff" /T/Ch)/P

>>                Wilhelm Liebknecht
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wilhelm+Liebknecht ,      
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Wilhelm Liebknecht" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT

>>                Left or Young Hegelians

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Left Hegelians" /P/Ch)/T

"Young Hegelians"                  (L/P + "-eft Hegelians"/C2)                  "Left Hegelians"

*           "Ludwig Feuerbach"  >>  ("Left Hegelians" /P/Ch)/T
*           "Bruno Bauer"  >>  ("Left Hegelians" /P/Ch)/T

>>              Ludwig Feuerbach and Bruno Bauer,
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Ludwig+Andreas+Feuerbach ,  
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Bruno+Bauer ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Ludwig Feuerbach" /T/Ch)/S
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Bruno Bauer" /T/Ch)/S

>>                     Max Stirner
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Max+Stirner ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Max Stirner" /S/Ch)/P

>>                     Moses Hess
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Moses+Hess ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Moses Hess" /C2/Ch)/S

>>                    Arnold Ruge
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Arnold+Ruge ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Arnold Ruge" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/S

>>                     Mikhail Bakunin
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Mikhail+Bakunin ,        
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Mikhail Bakunin" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/C2

>>                        Karl Kautsky
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Karl+Kautsky ,    
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Karl Kautsky" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P

>>                         Ferdinand Lassalle
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Ferdinand+Lassalle ,  
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Ferdinand Lassalle" /T/Ch)/C2

>>               August Bebel

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("August Bebel" /T/Ch)/C1

>>                Vera Zasulich
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Vera+Zasulich ,    
*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Vera Zasulich" /P/Ch)/C1


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/m#a46 ,  
•  The Communist Manifesto (English) (as Author)

"Communist Manifesto"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Communist Manifesto"                           (Fr/P + ogs/S)/Ch                         Frogs

•  Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (English) (as Author)

"Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte"                (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

"Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte"                (Cl/C2 + ouds/GC/S/abT)/Ch                Clouds

•  Manifesto of the Communist Party (English) (as Author)

"Manifesto of Communist Party"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Lysistrata

"Manifesto of Communist Party"                (Ly/GC/S/abT + sistrata/P)/Ch                Lysistrata

•  Revolution and Counter-Revolution
or, Germany in 1848 (English) (as Author)

"Revolution and Counter-Revolution"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/+bp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

"Germany in 1848"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/+cp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Revolution and Counter-Revolution"                   (Fr/P + ogs/S)/+bp/Ch                  Frogs

•  Secret Diplomatic History of The Eighteenth Century (English) (as Author)

"Secret Diplomatic History of Eighteenth Century"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/T)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Peace

"Secret Diplomatic History of Eighteenth Century"                (P/P + eace/T)/Ch                Peace

•  Selected Essays (English) (as Author)

"Selected Essays"                (K/S + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

"Selected Essays"                         (C/S + louds/GC/S/abT)/Ch                        Clouds

•  Το κεφάλαιον
Περίληψις Παύλου Λαφάργκ, μετά προλόγου Β. Παρέτο (Greek) (as Author)

==============

•    The Philosophical Manifesto of the Historical School of Law (1842)

"Philosophical Manifesto of Historical School of Law"                (K/T + "-arl Marx' writing"/C2)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Philosophical Manifesto of Historical School of Law"  >>  ("1842" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, 1843

"Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right"                (K/S + "-arl Marx' writing"/C2)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right"  >>  ("1843" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Lysistrata

"Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right"                (Ly/S + sistrata/C2)/Ch                Lysistrata

•    On the Jewish Question, 1843

"On Jewish Question"                (K/C1 + "-arl Marx' writing"/T)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "On Jewish Question"  >>  ("1843" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"On Jewish Question"                             (B/C1 + irds/T)/Ch                          Birds

•    Notes on James Mill, 1844

"Notes on James Mill"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Notes on James Mill"  >>  ("1844" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844, 1844

"Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844"                (K/S + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844"  >>  ("1844" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844"                (B/S + irds/P)/Ch               Birds

•    The Holy Family, 1845

"Holy Family"                   (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Holy Family"  >>  ("1845" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Clouds

"Holy Family"                                (Cl/P + ouds/S)/Ch                             Clouds

•    Theses on Feuerbach, 1845

"Theses on Feuerbach"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/C2)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Theses on Feuerbach"  >>  ("1845" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Acharnians

"Theses on Feuerbach"                ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Acharnians/C2)/Ch                Acharnians

•    The German Ideology, 1845

"German Ideology"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/T)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "German Ideology"  >>  ("1845" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"German Ideology"                           (B/GC/S/abT + irds/T)/Ch                        Birds

•    The Poverty of Philosophy, 1847

"Poverty of Philosophy"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Poverty of Philosophy"  >>  ("1847" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Poverty of Philosophy"                       (Fr/GC/S/abT + ogs/S)/Ch                      Frogs

•    Wage-Labor and Capital, 1847

"Wage-Labor and Capital"                (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Wage-Labor and Capital"  >>  ("1847" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"Wage-Labor and Capital"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Acharnians/S)/Ch                Acharnians

•    Grundrisse, 1857

Grundrisse                (K/S + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Grundrisse  >>  ("1857" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Acharnians

Grundrisse                       ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Acharnians/C2)/Ch                     Acharnians

•    A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, 1859

"Contribution to Critique of Political Economy"               (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/C2)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Contribution to Critique of Political Economy"  >>  ("1859" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Writings on the U.S. Civil War, 1861

"Writings on U.S. Civil War"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Writings on U.S. Civil War"  >>  ("1861" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Theories of Surplus Value, 3 volumes, 1862

"Theories of Surplus Value, 3 volumes"                (K/S + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Theories of Surplus Value, 3 volumes"  >>  ("1862" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Value, Price and Profit, 1865

"Value, Price and Profit"                (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Value, Price and Profit"  >>  ("1865" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Capital, Volume I (Das Kapital), 1867

Kapital                 (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume I"                 (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Kapital  >>  ("1867" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1/2

Kapital                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Eleven Comedies"

•    The Civil War in France, 1871

"Civil War in France"                (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Civil War in France"  >>  ("1871" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Acharnians

"Civil War in France"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Acharnians/P)/Ch                  Acharnians

•    Critique of the Gotha Program, 1875

"Critique of Gotha Program"                (K/T + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Critique of Gotha Program"  >>  ("1875" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Birds

"Critique of Gotha Program"                         (B/T + irds/S)/Ch                         Birds

•    Notes on Wagner, 1883

"Notes on Wagner"                (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Notes on Wagner"  >>  ("1883" /S/Ch)/C2

•    Capital, Volume II [posthumously published by Engels], 1885

Capital                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/+bp                  "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume II"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/+cp                  "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Capital  >>  ("1885" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1/2

Capital                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/P)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"

•    Capital, Volume III [posthumously published by Engels], 1894

Capital                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume III"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Capital  >>  ("1894" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Eleven Comedies, Volume 1/2

Capital                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "Capital, Volume I (Das Kapital)"  and     Aristophanes' "The Eleven Comedies"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/8688/pg8688.html ,  
Eleven Comedies

THE KNIGHTS

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas! Oh! woe! oh! woe! Miserable Paphlagonian![5] may the gods destroy both him and his cursed advice! Since that evil day when this new slave entered the house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows.

NICIAS. May the plague seize him, the arch-fiend—him and his lying tales!

DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow, what is your condition?

NICIAS. Very wretched, just like your own.

DEMOSTHENES. Then come, let us sing a duet of groans in the style of
Olympus.[6]

DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!

DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep! Enough of groaning! Let us consider how to save our pelts.

NICIAS. But how to do it! Can you suggest anything?

DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin. I cede you the honour.

NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I. Come, have courage! Speak, and then I will say what I think.

DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you!"[7]

NICIAS. I dare not. How could I express my thoughts with the pomp of
Euripides?

DEMOSTHENES. Oh! prithee, spare me! Do not pelt me with those vegetables,[8] but find some way of leaving our master.

NICIAS. Well, then! Say "Let-us-bolt," like this, in one breath.

DEMOSTHENES. I follow you—"Let-us-bolt."

NICIAS. Now after "Let-us-bolt" say "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. "At-top-speed!"

NICIAS. Splendid! Just as if you were masturbating yourself; first slowly, "Let-us-bolt"; then quick and firmly, "at-top-speed!"

DEMOSTHENES. Let-us-bolt, let-us-bolt-at-top-speed![9]

NICIAS. Hah! does that not please you?

DEMOSTHENES. I' faith, yes! yet I fear me your omen bodes no good to my hide.

NICIAS. How so?

DEMOSTHENES. Because hard rubbing abrades the skin when folk masturbate themselves.

NICIAS. The best thing we can do for the moment is to throw ourselves at the feet of the statue of some god.

DEMOSTHENES. Of which statue? Any statue? Do you then believe there are gods?

NICIAS. Certainly.

DEMOSTHENES. What proof have you?

NICIAS. The proof that they have taken a grudge against me. Is that not enough?

DEMOSTHENES. I'm convinced it is. But to pass on. Do you consent to my telling the spectators of our troubles? ~ ~


http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/index.htm ,  
Capital, Volume I (Das Kapital)

A Critique of Political Economy
Volume I
Book One: The Process of Production of Capital

Prefaces and Afterwords

D E D I C A T E D

TO MY UNFORGETTABLE FRIEND
Wilhelm
Wolff
INTREPID, FAITHFUL,
NOBLE PROTAGONIST OF THE PROLETARIAT
Born in Tarnau on June 21, 1809
Died in exile in Manchester on May 9, 1864

1867
Preface to the
First German Edition

The work, the first volume of which I now submit to the public, forms the continuation of my Zur Kritik der Politischen Oekonomie (A Contribution to the Criticism of Political Economy) published in 1859. The long pause between the first part and the continuation is due to an illness of many years’ duration that again and again interrupted my work.

The substance of that earlier work is summarised in the first three chapters of this volume. This is done not merely for the sake of connexion and completeness. The presentation of the subject matter is improved. As far as circumstances in any way permit, many points only hinted at in the earlier book are here worked out more fully, whilst, conversely, ~ ~


Kapital                 (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume I"                 (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Kapital  >>  ("1867" /S/Ch)/C2

Kapital                 ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Eleven Comedies"


1.          <THE> KNIGHTS --- <A> Critique of Political Economy

"Critique of Political Economy"               (KN/P + IGHTS/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "KNIGHTS"

2.
"Volume I"               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.                  Book One: <The> Process of Production of Capital

"Book One: Process of Production of Capital"               ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.
"Prefaces and Afterwords"               (M/P + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5.                    may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice

DEDICATED                (m/P + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows

"TO MY UNFORGETTABLE FRIEND Wilhelm Wolff INTREPID"               (S/P + ""-ince that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.              NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him

FAITHFUL               (N/P + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.             <the> arch --- NOBLE PROTAGONIST OF <THE> PROLETARIAT Born in Tarnau on June 21

"NOBLE PROTAGONIST OF PROLETARIAT Born in Tarnau on June 21"               ([ŋ=  w=]/P + arch/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                arch

9.
"1809 Died in exile in Manchester on May 9"               (f/P + iend/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                 fiend

10.
"1864"               (h/P + "-im and his lying tales"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "him and his lying tales"

11.                 1867 Preface to <the> First German Edition <The> work

"1867 Preface to First German Edition work"               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

12.                <the> first volume of which I now submit to <the> public

"first volume of which I now submit to public"               (wh/P + "-at is your condition"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "what is your condition"

13.               forms <the> continuation of my Zur Kritik der Politischen Oekonomie

"forms continuation of my Zur Kritik der Politischen Oekonomie"               (N/P + "-ICIAS. Very wretched"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "NICIAS. Very wretched"

14.                  <A> Contribution to <the> Criticism of Political Economy

"Contribution to Criticism of Political Economy"               (j/P + "-ust like your own"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "just like your own"

15.
"published in 1859"               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES. Then come"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES. Then come"

16. let us sing <a> duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus --- <The> long pause between <the> first part and <the> continuation is due to <an> illness of many years’ duration that again and again interrupted my work

"long pause between first part and continuation is due to illness of many years’ duration that again and again interrupted my work"               (l/P + "-et us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "let us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"

17.   <The> substance of that earlier work is summarised in <the> first three chapters of this volume

"substance of that earlier work is summarised in first three chapters of this volume"               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!"

18.               This is done not merely for <the> sake of connexion and completeness

"This is done not merely for sake of connexion and completeness"               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"

19.               <The> presentation of <the> subject matter is improved

"presentation of subject matter is improved"               ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "Enough of groaning"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Enough of groaning"

20.
"As far as circumstances in any way permit"               (L/P + "-et us consider how to save our pelts"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Let us consider how to save our pelts"

21.             many points only hinted at in <the> earlier book are here worked out more fully

"many points only hinted at in earlier book are here worked out more fully"               (N/P + "-ICIAS. But how to do it"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "NICIAS. But how to do it"

22.
whilst               (C/P + "-an you suggest anything"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "Can you suggest anything"

23.
conversely               (D/P + "-EMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                "DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "Capital, Volume II"  and     Aristophanes' "The Eleven Comedies"

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/cw/volume36/index.htm ,  
Capital, Volume II

Preface to the First Edition

It was no easy task to put the second book of Capital in shape for publication, and do it in a way that on the one hand would make it a connected and as far as possible complete work, and on the other would represent exclusively the work of its author, not of its editor. The great number of available, mostly fragmentary, texts worked on added to the difficulties of this task. At best one single manuscript (No. IV) had been revised throughout and made ready for press. ~ ~


Capital                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/+bp                  "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume II"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/+cp                  "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Capital  >>  ("1885" /S/Ch)/C2

Capital                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/P)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"


1. <THE> KNIGHTS --- Preface to <the> First Edition It was no easy task to put <the> second book of Capital in shape for publication

"Preface to First Edition It was no easy task to put second book of Capital in shape for publication"                  (K/C2 + NIGHTS/P)/+bp                  KNIGHTS


2. and do it in <a> way that on <the> one hand would make it <a> connected and as far as possible complete work

"and do it in way that on one hand would make it connected and as far as possible complete work"                    (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/P)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.                  and on <the> other would represent exclusively <the> work of its author

"and on other would represent exclusively work of its author"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/P)/+bp                  "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.
"not of its editor"                    (M/C2 + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/P)/+bp                  "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5.        may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice --- <The> great number of available

"great number of available"                    (m/C2 + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/P)/+bp                  "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows

"mostly fragmentary"                    (S/C2 + "-ince that evil day when this new slave entered  house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/P)/+bp                  "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.     NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him --- texts worked on added to <the> difficulties of this task

"texts worked on added to difficulties of this task"                    (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/P)/+bp                  "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.                 <the> arch

"At best one single manuscript"                ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + arch/P)/+bp                arch

9.
"N o"                                   (f/C2 + iend/P)/+bp                                  fiend

10.
"i v"                    (h/C2 + "-im and his lying tales"/P)/+bp                  "him and his lying tales"

11.
"had been revised throughout and made ready for press"                    (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/P)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "Capital, Volume III"  and     Aristophanes' "The Eleven Comedies"

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1894-c3/index.htm ,  
Capital, Volume III
The Process of Capitalist Production as a Whole

Preface

At last I have the privilege of making public this third book of Marx’s main work, the conclusion of the theoretical part. When I published the second volume, in 1885, I thought that except for a few, certainly very important, sections the third volume would probably offer only technical difficulties. This was indeed the case. But I had no idea at the time that these sections, the most important parts of the entire work, would give me as much trouble as they did, just as I did not anticipate the other obstacles, which were to retard completion of the work to such an extent.

Next and most important of all, it was my eye weakness which for years restricted my writing time to a minimum, and which, even now, permits me to write by artificial light only in exceptional cases. Furthermore, there were other pressing labours which could not be turned down, such as new editions and translations of Marx’s and my own earlier works, hence reviews, prefaces, and supplements, often impossible without fresh study, etc. Above all, ~ ~


Capital                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Karl Marx' writing"
"Volume III"                     (K/C2 + "-arl Marx' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Karl Marx' writing"

*              Capital  >>  ("1894" /S/Ch)/C2

Capital                     ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Eleven Comedies"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Eleven Comedies"


1.                     <THE> KNIGHTS --- <The> Process of Capitalist Production as <a> Whole

"Process of Capitalist Production as Whole"                   (KN/C2 + IGHTS/GC/S/abT)/+bp                   KNIGHTS

2.      Preface At last I have <the> privilege of making public this third book of Marx’s main work

"Preface At last I have privilege of making public this third book of Marx’s main work"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Oh! alas! alas!"

3.                     <the> conclusion of <the> theoretical part

"conclusion of theoretical part"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Oh! woe! oh! woe!"

4.                     When I published <the> second volume

"When I published the second volume"                   (M/C2 + "-iserable Paphlagonian"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Miserable Paphlagonian"

5.            may <the> gods destroy both him and his cursed advice

"in 1885"                   (m/C2 + "-ay gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "may gods destroy both him and his cursed advice"

6. Since that evil day when this new slave entered <the> house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows --- I thought that except for <a> few

"I thought that except for few"                   (S/C2 + "-ince that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Since that evil day when this new slave entered house he has never ceased belabouring us with blows"

7.                      NICIAS. May <the> plague seize him

"certainly very important"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. May plague seize him"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. May plague seize him"

8.            <the> arch --- sections <the> third volume would probably offer only technical difficulties

"sections third volume would probably offer only technical difficulties"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + arch/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  arch

9.                     This was indeed <the> case

"This was indeed case"                       (f/C2 + iend/GC/S/abT)/+bp                     fiend

10.                But I had no idea at <the> time that these sections

"But I had no idea at time that these sections"                   (h/C2 + "-im and his lying tales"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "him and his lying tales"

11.                <the> most important parts of <the> entire work

"most important parts of entire work"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Hah! my poor fellow"

12.
"would give me as much trouble as they did"                   (wh/C2 + "-at is your condition"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "what is your condition"

13.                  just as I did not anticipate <the> other obstacles

"just as I did not anticipate other obstacles"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. Very wretched"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. Very wretched"

14.                 which were to retard completion of <the> work to such <an> extent

"which were to retard completion of work to such extent"                   (j/C2 + "-ust like your own"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "just like your own"

15.
"Next and most important of all"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Then come"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Then come"

16. let us sing <a> duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus --- it was my eye weakness which for years restricted my writing time to <a> minimum

"it was my eye weakness which for years restricted my writing time to minimum"                   (l/C2 + "-et us sing duet of groans in <the> style of Olympus"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "let us sing duet of groans in style of Olympus"

17.
"and which"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES AND NICIAS. Boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo! boo, hoo!!"

18.
"even now"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Bah! 'tis lost labour to weep"

19.
"permits me to write by artificial light only in exceptional cases"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enough of groaning"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Enough of groaning"

20.
Furthermore                   (L/C2 + "-et us consider how to save our pelts"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Let us consider how to save our pelts"

21.
"there were other pressing labours which could not be turned down"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. But how to do it"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. But how to do it"

22.
"such as new editions and translations of Marx’s and my own earlier works"                   (C/C2 + "-an you suggest anything"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Can you suggest anything"

23.
"hence reviews"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. Nay! you begin"

24.                 I cede you <the> honour

prefaces                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "I cede you honour"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "I cede you honour"

25.
"and supplements"                   (N/C2 + "-ICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "NICIAS. By Apollo! no, not I"

26.
"often impossible without fresh study"                   (C/C2 + "-ome, have courage"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Come, have courage"

27.
"e t c"                   (Sp/C2 + "-eak, and then I will say what I think "/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Speak, and then I will say what I think"

28.
"Above all"                   (D/C2 + "-EMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "DEMOSTHENES. "Ah! would you but tell me what I should tell you"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "The Poverty of Philosophy"  and     Aristophanes' "The Frogs"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/7998/pg7998.html ,    
The Frogs

A CHORUS OF FROGS
A CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS

_Attendants at a Funeral;

Women worshipping Iacchus;

Servants of Pluto, &c._

Xanthias

Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master,
At which the audience never fail to laugh?

DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will, except I'm getting crushed: Fight shy of that: I'm sick of that already.

XAN. Nothing else smart?

DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching.

XAN. Come now, that comical joke?

DIO. With all my heart. Only be careful not to shift your pole,
And—

XAN. What?

DIO. And vow that you've a bellyache.

XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened so
That if none ease me, I must ease myself?

DIO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit.

XAN. What! must I bear these burdens, and not make
One of the jokes Ameipsias and Lycis
And Phrynichus, in every play they write,
Put in the mouths of all their burden-bearers?

DIO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see
Their plays, and hear those jokes, I come away
More than a twelvemonth older than I went.

XAN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now
Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke!

DIO. Now is not this fine pampered insolence
When I myself, Dionysus, son of—Pipkin,
Toil on afoot, and let this fellow ride,
Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing?

XAN. What, don't I bear?

DIO. How can you when you're riding?

XAN. Why, I bear these.

DIO. How?

XAN. Most unwillingly.

DIO. Does not the donkey bear the load you're bearing?

XAN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he.

DIO. How can you bear, when you are borne yourself?

XAN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder's aching.

DIO. Then since you say the donkey helps you not,
You lift him up and carry him in turn.

XAN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea?
You should have smarted bitterly for this. ~ ~


http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1847/poverty-philosophy/ ,    
The Poverty of Philosophy

Answer to the Philosophy of Poverty by M. Proudhon

Foreword

M. Proudhon has the misfortune of being peculiarly misunderstood in Europe. In France, he has the right to be a bad economist, because he is reputed to be a good German philosopher. In Germany, he has the right to be a bad philosopher, because he is reputed to be one of the ablest French economists. Being both German and economist at the same time, we desire to protest against this double error.

The reader will understand that in this thankless task we have often had to abandon our criticism of M. Proudhon in order to criticize German philosophy, and at the same time to give some observations on political economy.

Karl Marx
Brussels, June 15, 1847

M. Proudhon's work is not just a treatise on political economy, an ordinary book; it is a bible. "Mysteries", "Secrets Wrested from the Bosom of God", "Revelations" – it lacks nothing. But as prophets are discussed nowadays more conscientiously than profane writers, the reader must resign himself to going with us through the arid and gloomy eruditions of "Genesis", in order to ascend later, with M. Proudhon, into the ethereal and fertile realm of super-socialism. (See Proudhon, Philosophy of Poverty, Prologue, p.III, line 20.)

Preface to the First German Edition

The present work was produced in the winter of 1846-47, ~ ~


"Poverty of Philosophy"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

*              "Poverty of Philosophy"  >>  ("1847" /S/Ch)/C2

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Poverty of Philosophy"                       (Fr/GC/S/abT + ogs/S)/Ch                      Frogs


1. <A> CHORUS OF FROGS <A> CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS --- Answer to <the> Philosophy of Poverty by M

"Answer to Philosophy of Poverty by M"                   (CH/GC/S/abT + "-ORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"/S)/Ch                  "CHORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"

2.                    Attendants at <a> Funeral

Proudhon                  ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "Attendants at Funeral"/S)/Ch                  "Attendants at Funeral"

3.
"Foreword M"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-omen worshipping Iacchus"/S)/Ch                  "Women worshipping Iacchus"

4.                 Proudhon has <the> misfortune of being peculiarly misunderstood in Europe

"Proudhon has misfortune of being peculiarly misunderstood in Europe"                   (S/GC/S/abT + "-ervants of Pluto, &/N c"/S)/Ch                  "Servants of Pluto, &/N c"

5.
"In France"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-anthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"/S)/Ch                  "Xanthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"

6. At which <the> audience never fail to laugh --- he has <the> right to be <a> bad economist

"he has right to be bad economist"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "At which audience never fail to laugh"/S)/Ch                  "At which audience never fail to laugh"

7.                because he is reputed to be a good German philosopher

"because he is reputed to be good German philosopher"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IONYSUS. Aye, what you will"/S)/Ch                  "DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will"

8.
"In Germany"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "except I'm getting crushed"/S)/Ch                  "except I'm getting crushed"

9.                    he has <the> right to be <a> bad philosopher

"he has right to be bad philosopher"                   (F/GC/S/abT + "-ight shy of that"/S)/Ch                  "Fight shy of that"

10.                 because he is reputed to be one of <the> ablest French economists

"because he is reputed to be one of ablest French economists"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "I'm sick of that already"/S)/Ch                  "I'm sick of that already"

11.                 Being both German and economist at <the> same time

"Being both German and economist at same time"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Nothing else smart"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Nothing else smart"

12.
"we desire to protest against this double error"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"

13. <The> reader will understand that in this thankless task we have often had to abandon our criticism of M

"reader will understand that in this thankless task we have often had to abandon our criticism of M"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Come now, that comical joke"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Come now, that comical joke"

14.
"Proudhon in order to criticize German philosophy"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. With all my heart"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. With all my heart"

15.                and at <the> same time to give some observations on political economy

"and at same time to give some observations on political economy"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"/S)/Ch                  "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"

16.
"Karl Marx Brussels"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. What"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. What"

17.                      DIO. And vow that you've <a> bellyache

"June 15"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. And vow that you've bellyache"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. And vow that you've bellyache"

18.
"1847 M"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"

19.               Proudhon's work is not just <a> treatise on political economy

"Proudhon's work is not just treatise on political economy"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "I must ease myself"/S)/Ch                  "I must ease myself"

20.                         <an> ordinary book

"ordinary book"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit"

21.                           it is <a> bible

"it is bible"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. What! must I bear these burdens"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. What! must I bear these burdens"

22.                and not make One of <the> jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus

Mysteries                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and not make One of jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus"/S)/Ch                  "and not make One of jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus"

23. Secrets Wrested from <the> Bosom of God --- in every play they write, Put in <the> mouths of all their burden-bearers

"Secrets Wrested from Bosom of God"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "in every play they write, Put in mouths of all their burden-bearers"/S)/Ch                  "in every play they write, Put in mouths of all their burden-bearers"

24.
Revelations                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see Their plays"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see Their plays"

25.          and hear those jokes, I come away More than <a> twelvemonth older than I went

"it lacks nothing"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and hear those jokes, I come away More than twelvemonth older than I went"/S)/Ch                  "and hear those jokes, I come away More than twelvemonth older than I went"

26.
"But as prophets are discussed nowadays more conscientiously than profane writers"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke"

27.      <the> reader must resign himself to going with us through <the> arid and gloomy eruditions of

"reader must resign himself to going with us through arid and gloomy eruditions of"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. Now is not this fine pampered insolence When I myself"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Now is not this fine pampered insolence When I myself"

28.
Genesis                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-ionysus, son of—Pipkin, Toil on afoot"/S)/Ch                "Dionysus, son of—Pipkin, Toil on afoot"

29.
"in order to ascend later"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and let this fellow ride, Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing"/S)/Ch                  "and let this fellow ride, Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing"

30.
"with M"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. What, don't I bear"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. What, don't I bear"

31.
Proudhon                  (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. How can you when you're riding"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. How can you when you're riding"

32.                  into <the> ethereal and fertile realm of super

"into ethereal and fertile realm of super"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Why, I bear these"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Why, I bear these"

33.
socialism                       (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. How"/S)/Ch                       "DIO. How"

34.
"See Proudhon"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Most unwillingly"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Most unwillingly"

35.               DIO. Does not <the> donkey bear <the> load you're bearing

"Philosophy of Poverty"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. Does not donkey bear load you're bearing"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Does not donkey bear load you're bearing"

36.
Prologue                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he"

37.
"p"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. How can you bear, when you are borne yourself"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. How can you bear, when you are borne yourself"

38.
"i i i"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder's aching"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder's aching"

39.      DIO. Then since you say <the> donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn

"line 20"                   (D/GC/S/abT + "-IO. Then since you say donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Then since you say donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn"

40.    Preface to <the> First German Edition <The> present work was produced in <the> winter of 1846

"Preface to First German Edition present work was produced in winter of 1846"                   (X/GC/S/abT + "-AN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea"

41.
"47"                   (Y/GC/S/abT + "-ou should have smarted bitterly for this"/S)/Ch                  "You should have smarted bitterly for this"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "Manifesto of the Communist Party"  and     Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7700/7700-h/7700-h.htm ,  
Lysistrata

LYSISTRATA stands alone with the Propylaea at her back.

LYSISTRATA

If they were trysting for a Bacchanal,
A feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis,
The tambourines would block the rowdy streets,
But now there's not a woman to be seen
Except--ah, yes--this neighbour of mine yonder.

Enter CALONICE.

Good day Calonice.

CALONICE

Good day Lysistrata.
But what has vexed you so? Tell me, child.
What are these black looks for? It doesn't suit you
To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that.

LYSISTRATA

Calonice, it's more than I can bear,
I am hot all over with blushes for our sex.
Men say we're slippery rogues--

CALONICE

And aren't they right?

LYSISTRATA

Yet summoned on the most tremendous business
For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed.

CALONICE

My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know,
To get away. There's so much to do;
Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers:
Servants to be poked out: children washed
Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap.

LYSISTRATA

But I tell you, here's a far more weighty object.

CALONICE

What is it all about, dear Lysistrata,
That you've called the women hither in a troop?
What kind of an object is it?

LYSISTRATA

A tremendous thing!

CALONICE

And long?

LYSISTRATA

Indeed, it may be very lengthy.

CALONICE

Then why aren't they here?

LYSISTRATA

No man's connected with it;
If that was the case, they'd soon come fluttering along.~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/61/pg61.html ,  
Manifesto of the Communist Party

A spectre is haunting Europe—the spectre of Communism.
All the Powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to
exorcise this spectre: Pope and Czar, Metternich and Guizot,
French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as Communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the Opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of Communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact.

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European Powers to be itself a Power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a Manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London, and sketched the following Manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

I. BOURGEOIS AND PROLETARIANS

The history of all hitherto existing societies is the history of class struggles.

Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, ~ ~


"Manifesto of Communist Party"                (K/GC/S/abT + "-arl Marx' writing"/P)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' Lysistrata

"Manifesto of Communist Party"                (Ly/GC/S/abT + sistrata/P)/Ch                Lysistrata


1.        LYSISTRATA stands alone with <the> Propylaea at her back --- <A> spectre is haunting Europe

"spectre is haunting Europe"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"

2.          LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for <a> Bacchanal --- <the> spectre of Communism

"spectre of Communism"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"

3. <A> feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis --- All <the> Powers of old Europe have entered into <a> holy alliance to exorcise this spectre

"All Powers of old Europe have entered into holy alliance to exorcise this spectre"                   (f/GC/S/abT + "-east of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"/P)/Ch                  "feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"

4.             <The> tambourines would block <the> rowdy streets

"Pope and Czar"                  (t/GC/S/abT + "-ambourines would block rowdy streets"/P)/Ch                  "tambourines would block rowdy streets"

5.              But now there's not <a> woman to be seen Except

"Metternich and Guizot"                   (B/GC/S/abT + "-ut now there's not woman to be seen Except"/P)/Ch                  "But now there's not woman to be seen Except"

6.
"French Radicals and German police"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "ah, yes"/P)/Ch                    "ah, yes"

7.
spies                   (th/GC/S/abT + "-is neighbour of mine yonder"/P)/Ch                  "this neighbour of mine yonder"

8.       Where is <the> party in opposition that has not been decried as Communistic by its opponents in power

"Where is party in opposition that has not been decried as Communistic by its opponents in power"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "Enter CALONICE"/P)/Ch                  "Enter CALONICE"

9.     Where is <the> Opposition that has not hurled back <the> branding reproach of Communism

"Where is Opposition that has not hurled back branding reproach of Communism"                   (G/GC/S/abT + "-ood day Calonice"/P)/Ch                  "Good day Calonice"

10.                against <the> more advanced opposition parties

"against more advanced opposition parties"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE Good day Lysistrata"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE Good day Lysistrata"

11.
"as well as against its reactionary adversaries"                   (B/GC/S/abT + "-ut what has vexed you so"/P)/Ch                  "But what has vexed you so"

12.
"Two things result from this fact"                   (T/GC/S/abT + "-ell me, child"/P)/Ch                  "Tell me, child"

13.
"i"                   (Wh/GC/S/abT + "-at are these black looks for"/P)/Ch                  "What are these black looks for"

14.         Communism is already acknowledged by all European Powers to be itself <a> Power

"Communism is already acknowledged by all European Powers to be itself Power"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"/P)/Ch                  "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"

15.
"i i"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"

16.
"It is high time that Communists should openly"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"/P)/Ch                  "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"

17.                in <the> face of <the> whole world

"in face of whole world"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE And aren't they right"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE And aren't they right"

18. LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on <the> most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed

"publish their views"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"

19.
"their aims"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"

20.
"their tendencies"                   (Th /GC/S/abT + " -ere's so much to do"/P)/Ch                  "There's so much to do"

21. and meet this nursery tale of <the> Spectre of Communism with <a> Manifesto of <the> party itself

"and meet this nursery tale of Spectre of Communism with Manifesto of party itself"                   (H/GC/S/abT + "-usbands to be patted and put in good tempers"/P)/Ch                  "Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers"

22.
"To this end"                   (S/GC/S/abT + "-ervants to be poked out"/P)/Ch                  "Servants to be poked out"

23.
"Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London"                   (ch/GC/S/abT + "-ildren washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"/P)/Ch                  "children washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"

24. and sketched <the> following Manifesto --- LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's <a> far more weighty object

"and sketched following Manifesto"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"

25.                   to be published in <the> English

"to be published in English"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"

26.                   That you've called <the> women hither in <a> troop

French                   (Th/GC/S/abT + "- at you've called women hither in troop"/P)/Ch                  "That you've called women hither in troop "

27.                      What kind of <an> object is it

German                   (Wh/GC/S/abT + "-at kind of object is it"/P)/Ch                  "What kind of object is it"

28.                      LYSISTRATA <A> tremendous thing

Italian                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA tremendous thing"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA tremendous thing"

29.
"Flemish and Danish languages"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE And long"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE And long"

30.
"i"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"


31. BOURGEOIS AND PROLETARIANS <The> history of all hitherto existing societies is <the> history of class struggles

"BOURGEOIS AND PROLETARIANS history of all hitherto existing societies is history of class struggles"                   (C/GC/S/abT + "-ALONICE Then why aren't they here"/P)/Ch                  "CALONICE Then why aren't they here"

32.
"Freeman and slave"                   (LY/GC/S/abT + "-SISTRATA No man's connected with it"/P)/Ch                  "LYSISTRATA No man's connected with it"

33.              If that was <the> case, they'd soon come fluttering along

"patrician and plebeian"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/GC/S/abT + "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"/P)/Ch                  "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Karl Marx'  "The Communist Manifesto"  and     Aristophanes' "The Frogs"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31193/31193-h/31193-h.htm ,  
PREFACE

The "Manifesto" was published as the platform of the "Communist League," a workingmen's association, first exclusively German, later on international, and, under the political conditions of the Continent before 1848, unavoidably a secret society. At a Congress of the League, held in London in November, 1847, Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication a complete theoretical and practical party programme. Drawn up in German, in January, 1848, the manuscript was sent to the printer in London a few weeks before the French revolution of February 24. A French translation was brought out in Paris, shortly before the insurrection of June, 1848. The first English translation, by Miss Helen Macfarlane, appeared in George Julian Harney's "Red Republican," London, 1850. A Danish and a Polish edition had also been published.

The defeat of the Parisian insurrection of June, 1848—the first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie—drove again into the background, for a time, the social and political aspirations of the European working class. Thenceforth, the struggle for supremacy was again, as it had been before the revolution of February, solely between the different sections of the propertied class; the working class was reduced to a fight for political elbow-room, and to the position of extreme wing of the Middle-class Radicals. ~ ~


•  The Communist Manifesto (English) (as Author)

"Communist Manifesto"                (K/P + "-arl Marx' writing"/S)/Ch                "Karl Marx' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/7998/pg7998.html ,
Aristophanes' The Frogs

"Communist Manifesto"                           (Fr/P + ogs/S)/Ch                         Frogs


1.                <A> CHORUS OF FROGS <A> CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS

PREFACE                   (CH/P + "-ORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"/S)/Ch                  "CHORUS OF FROGS CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS"

2.                    Attendants at <a> Funeral --- <The> "Manifesto"

Manifesto                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Attendants at Funeral"/S)/Ch                  "Attendants at Funeral"

3.                was published as <the> platform of <the>

"was published as platform of"                   (W/P + "-omen worshipping Iacchus"/S)/Ch                  "Women worshipping Iacchus"

4.
"Communist League"                   (S/P + "-ervants of Pluto, &/N c"/S)/Ch                  "Servants of Pluto, &/N c"

5.                     <a> workingmen's association

"workingmen's association"                   (X/P + "-anthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"/S)/Ch                  "Xanthias Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master"

6.                   At which <the> audience never fail to laugh

"first exclusively German"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "At which audience never fail to laugh"/S)/Ch                  "At which audience never fail to laugh"

7.
"later on international"                   (D/P + "-IONYSUS. Aye, what you will"/S)/Ch                  "DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will"

8.
and                    ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "except I'm getting crushed"/S)/Ch                  "except I'm getting crushed"

9.                under <the> political conditions of <the> Continent before 1848

"under political conditions of Continent before 1848"                   (F/P + "-ight shy of that"/S)/Ch                  "Fight shy of that"

10.                  unavoidably <a> secret society

"unavoidably secret society"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I'm sick of that already"/S)/Ch                  "I'm sick of that already"

11.                  At <a> Congress of <the> League

"At Congress of League"                   (X/P + "-AN. Nothing else smart"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Nothing else smart"

12.
"held in London in November"                   (D/P + "-IO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching"

13.
"1847"                   (X/P + "-AN. Come now, that comical joke"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Come now, that comical joke"

14. Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication <a> complete theoretical and practical party programme

"Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication complete theoretical and practical party programme"                   (D/P + "-IO. With all my heart"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. With all my heart"

15.
"Drawn up in German"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"/S)/Ch                  "Only be careful not to shift your pole, And"

16.
"in January"                         (X/P + "-AN. What"/S)/Ch                         "XAN. What"

17.                      DIO. And vow that you've <a> bellyache

"1848"                   (D/P + "-IO. And vow that you've bellyache"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. And vow that you've bellyache"

18. <the> manuscript was sent to <the> printer in London <a> few weeks before <the> French revolution of February 24

"manuscript was sent to printer in London few weeks before French revolution of February 24"                   (X/P + "-AN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened so That if none ease me"

19.                     <A> French translation was brought out in Paris

"French translation was brought out in Paris"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "I must ease myself"/S)/Ch                  "I must ease myself"

20.                    shortly before <the> insurrection of June

"shortly before insurrection of June"                   (D/P + "-IO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit"

21.
"1848"                   (X/P + "-AN. What! must I bear these burdens"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. What! must I bear these burdens"

22. and not make One of <the> jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus --- <The> first English translation

"first English translation"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and not make One of jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus"/S)/Ch                  "and not make One of jokes Ameipsias and Lycis And Phrynichus"

23.              in every play they write, Put in <the> mouths of all their burden-bearers

"by Miss Helen Macfarlane"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in every play they write, Put in mouths of all their burden-bearers"/S)/Ch                  "in every play they write, Put in mouths of all their burden-bearers"

24.
"appeared in George Julian Harney's"                   (D/P + "-IO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see Their plays"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I see Their plays"

25.          and hear those jokes, I come away More than <a> twelvemonth older than I went

"Red Republican"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and hear those jokes, I come away More than twelvemonth older than I went"/S)/Ch                  "and hear those jokes, I come away More than twelvemonth older than I went"

26.
London                   (X/P + "-AN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which now Is getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke"

27.
"1850"                   (D/P + "-IO. Now is not this fine pampered insolence When I myself"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Now is not this fine pampered insolence When I myself"

28.                  <A> Danish and <a> Polish edition had also been published

"Danish and Polish edition had also been published"                  (D/P + "-ionysus, son of—Pipkin, Toil on afoot"/S)/Ch                "Dionysus, son of—Pipkin, Toil on afoot"

29.                  <The> defeat of <the> Parisian insurrection of June

"defeat of Parisian insurrection of June"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "and let this fellow ride, Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing"/S)/Ch                  "and let this fellow ride, Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing"

30.
"1848"                   (X/P + "-AN. What, don't I bear"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. What, don't I bear"

31.                   <the> first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie

"first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie"                  (D/P + "-IO. How can you when you're riding"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. How can you when you're riding"

32.                  drove again into <the> background

"drove again into background"                   (X/P + "-AN. Why, I bear these"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Why, I bear these"

33.                     for <a> time

"for time"                            (D/P + "-IO. How"/S)/Ch                          "DIO. How"

34.                <the> social and political aspirations of <the> European working class

"social and political aspirations of European working class"                   (X/P + "-AN. Most unwillingly"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Most unwillingly"

35.               DIO. Does not <the> donkey bear <the> load you're bearing

Thenceforth                   (D/P + "-IO. Does not donkey bear load you're bearing"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Does not donkey bear load you're bearing"

36.                   <the> struggle for supremacy was again

"struggle for supremacy was again"                   (X/P + "-AN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he"

37.                 as it had been before <the> revolution of February

"as it had been before revolution of February"                   (D/P + "-IO. How can you bear, when you are borne yourself"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. How can you bear, when you are borne yourself"

38.                solely between <the> different sections of <the> propertied class

"solely between different sections of propertied class"                   (X/P + "-AN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder's aching"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder's aching"

39. DIO. Then since you say <the> donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn --- <the> working class was reduced to <a> fight for political elbow

"working class was reduced to fight for political elbow"                   (D/P + "-IO. Then since you say donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Then since you say donkey helps you not, You lift him up and carry him in turn"

40.
room                   (X/P + "-AN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea"/S)/Ch                  "XAN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea"

41.                  and to <the> position of extreme wing of <the> Middle

"and to position of extreme wing of Middle"                   (Y/P + "-ou should have smarted bitterly for this"/S)/Ch                  "You should have smarted bitterly for this"

42.              DIO. Get down, you rascal; I've been trudging on Till now I've reached <the> portal

"class Radicals"                   (D/P + "-IO. Get down, you rascal; I've been trudging on Till now I've reached portal"/S)/Ch                  "DIO. Get down, you rascal; I've been trudging on Till now I've reached portal"

Et cetera.



Friedrich Engels
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Friedrich+Engels ,  

*           "Karl Marx"  >>  ("Friedrich Engels" /T/Ch)/C2

*                        "Friedrich Engels"  >>  Engels /T

Full name                     Friedrich Engels
Born                        28 November 1820                               Barmen, Prussia
Died                  5 August 1895(1895-08-05) (aged 74)                 London, England

"1820"                      (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/T)/+bp                      "Friedrich Engels"
November                   (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/T)/+cp                      "Friedrich Engels"
"28"                     (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/T)/Ch/+bp                      "Friedrich Engels"
"Barmen, Prussia"                (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/T)/Ch/+cp                  "Friedrich Engels"

"1895"                      (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/S)/+bp                       "Friedrich Engels"
August                      (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/S)/+cp                       "Friedrich Engels"
"5"                      (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/S)/Ch/+bp                       "Friedrich Engels"
"London, England"              (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels"/S)/Ch/+cp                "Friedrich Engels"


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/e#a47 ,    
•  The Communist Manifesto (English) (as Author)

"Communist Manifesto"                (Fr/T + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/C2)                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

"Communist Manifesto"                        (Lys/T + istrata/C2)                       Lysistrata

•  The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844
with a Preface written in 1892 (English) (as Author)

"Condition of Working-Class in England in 1844"                (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

"with Preface written in 1892"                (Fr/P + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

"Condition of Working-Class in England in 1844"                (B/P + irds/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Birds

•  Feuerbach: The roots of the socialist philosophy (English) (as Author)

Feuerbach                 (Fr/S + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/P)/+cp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

"roots of socialist philosophy"                 (Fr/S + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/P)/+bp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

Feuerbach                                  (C/S + louds/P)/+cp                              Clouds

•  Landmarks of Scientific Socialism
"Anti-Duehring" (English) (as Author)

"Landmarks of Scientific Socialism"                 (Fr/S + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

"Anti-Duehring"                 (Fr/S + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "<The> Birds"

"Landmarks of Scientific Socialism"                 (B/S + irds/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Birds

•  Manifesto of the Communist Party (English) (as Author)

"Manifesto of Communist Party"                 (Fr/C2 + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Manifesto of Communist Party"                 (C/C2 + louds/GC/S/abT)                  Clouds

•  The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (English) (as Author)

"Origin of Family, Private Property and State"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/S)/+cp                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Clouds"

"Origin of Family, Private Property and State"                 (C/GC/S/abT + louds/S)/+cp                  Clouds



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Friedrich Engels'  "The Communist Manifesto"  and     Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7700/7700-h/7700-h.htm ,  
Lysistrata

LYSISTRATA stands alone with the Propylaea at her back.

LYSISTRATA

If they were trysting for a Bacchanal,
A feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis,
The tambourines would block the rowdy streets,
But now there's not a woman to be seen
Except--ah, yes--this neighbour of mine yonder.

Enter CALONICE.

Good day Calonice.

CALONICE

Good day Lysistrata.
But what has vexed you so? Tell me, child.
What are these black looks for? It doesn't suit you
To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that.

LYSISTRATA

Calonice, it's more than I can bear,
I am hot all over with blushes for our sex.
Men say we're slippery rogues--

CALONICE

And aren't they right?

LYSISTRATA

Yet summoned on the most tremendous business
For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed.

CALONICE

My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know,
To get away. There's so much to do;
Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers:
Servants to be poked out: children washed
Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap.

LYSISTRATA

But I tell you, here's a far more weighty object.

CALONICE

What is it all about, dear Lysistrata,
That you've called the women hither in a troop?
What kind of an object is it?

LYSISTRATA

A tremendous thing!

CALONICE

And long?

LYSISTRATA

Indeed, it may be very lengthy.

CALONICE

Then why aren't they here?

LYSISTRATA

No man's connected with it;
If that was the case, they'd soon come fluttering along.~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31193/31193-h/31193-h.htm ,  
PREFACE

The "Manifesto" was published as the platform of the "Communist League," a workingmen's association, first exclusively German, later on international, and, under the political conditions of the Continent before 1848, unavoidably a secret society. At a Congress of the League, held in London in November, 1847, Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication a complete theoretical and practical party programme. Drawn up in German, in January, 1848, the manuscript was sent to the printer in London a few weeks before the French revolution of February 24. A French translation was brought out in Paris, shortly before the insurrection of June, 1848. The first English translation, by Miss Helen Macfarlane, appeared in George Julian Harney's "Red Republican," London, 1850. A Danish and a Polish edition had also been published.

The defeat of the Parisian insurrection of June, 1848—the first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie—drove again into the background, for a time,
the social and political aspirations of the European working class. Thenceforth, the struggle for supremacy was again, as it had been before the revolution of February, solely between the different sections of the propertied class; the working class was reduced to a fight for political elbow-room, and to the position of extreme wing of the Middle-class Radicals. ~ ~


"Communist Manifesto"                (Fr/T + "-iedrich Engels' writing"/C2)                  "Friedrich Engels' writing"

"Communist Manifesto"                        (Lys/T + istrata/C2)                       Lysistrata


1.        LYSISTRATA stands alone with <the> Propylaea at her back --- PREFACE <The>

PREFACE                  (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"

2.          LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for <a> Bacchanal

Manifesto                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"

3.            <A> feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis --- was published as <the> platform of <the>

"was published as platform of"                   (f/T + "-east of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"/C2)                  "feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"

4.             <The> tambourines would block <the> rowdy streets

"Communist League"                  (t/T + "-ambourines would block rowdy streets"/C2)                  "tambourines would block rowdy streets"

5.            But now there's not <a> woman to be seen Except --- <a> workingmen's association

"workingmen's association"                   (B/T + "-ut now there's not woman to be seen Except"/C2)                  "But now there's not woman to be seen Except"

6.
"first exclusively German"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ah, yes"/C2)                    "ah, yes"

7.
"later on international"                   (th/T + "-is neighbour of mine yonder"/C2)                  "this neighbour of mine yonder"

8.
and                     ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter CALONICE"/C2)                    "Enter CALONICE"

9.             under <the> political conditions of <the> Continent before 1848

"under political conditions of Continent before 1848"                   (G/T + "-ood day Calonice"/C2)                  "Good day Calonice"

10.                    unavoidably <a> secret society

"unavoidably secret society"                 (C/T + "-ALONICE Good day Lysistrata"/C2)                  "CALONICE Good day Lysistrata"

11.                   At <a> Congress of <the> League

"At Congress of League"                   (B/T + "-ut what has vexed you so"/C2)                  "But what has vexed you so"

12.
"held in London in November"                   (T/T + "-ell me, child"/c2)                  "Tell me, child"

13.
"1847"                   (Wh/T + "-at are these black looks for"/C2)                  "What are these black looks for"

14. Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication <a> complete theoretical and practical party programme

"Marx and Engels were commissioned to prepare for publication complete theoretical and practical party programme"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"/C2)                  "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"

15.
"Drawn up in German"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"

16.
"in January"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"/C2)                  "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"

17.
"1848"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE And aren't they right"/C2)                  "CALONICE And aren't they right"

18. LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on <the> most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed

"manuscript was sent to printer in London few weeks before French revolution of February 24"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"

19.                  <A> French translation was brought out in Paris

"French translation was brought out in Paris"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"/C2)                  "CALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"

20.                  shortly before <the> insurrection of June

"shortly before insurrection of June"                   (Th /T + " -ere's so much to do"/C2)                  "There's so much to do"

21.
"1848"                   (H/T + "-usbands to be patted and put in good tempers"/C2)                  "Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers"

22.                    <The> first English translation

"first English translation"                   (S/T + "-ervants to be poked out"/C2)                  "Servants to be poked out"

23.
"by Miss Helen Macfarlane"                   (ch/T + "-ildren washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"/C2)                  "children washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"

24.              LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's <a> far more weighty object

"appeared in George Julian Harney's"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"

25.
"Red Republican"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"/C2)                  "CALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"

26.                   That you've called <the> women hither in <a> troop

London                  (Th/T + "- at you've called women hither in troop"/C2)                  "That you've called women hither in troop "

27.                      What kind of <an> object is it

"1850"                  (Wh/T + "-at kind of object is it"/C2)                  "What kind of object is it"

28.                      LYSISTRATA <A> tremendous thing

"Danish and Polish edition had also been published"                  (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA tremendous thing"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA tremendous thing"

29.                 <The> defeat of <the> Parisian insurrection of June

"defeat of Parisian insurrection of June"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE And long"/C2)                  "CALONICE And long"

30.
"1848"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"/c2)                  "LYSISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"


31.                    <the> first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie

"first great battle between Proletariat and Bourgeoisie"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE Then why aren't they here"/C2)                  "CALONICE Then why aren't they here"

32.                     drove again into <the> background

"drove again into background"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA No man's connected with it"/C2)                  "LYSISTRATA No man's connected with it"

33.              If that was <the> case, they'd soon come fluttering along --- for <a> time

"for time"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"/C2)                  "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Friedrich Engels'  "Manifesto of the Communist Party"  and     Aristophanes' "Clouds"