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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | brd2 | Kor | book | FUN member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, main :::


596 12 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   John Dryden,  Jonathan Swift,  Alexander Pope,  William Cowper,  John Fletcher,       Walter Scott,     Stendhal

Joseph Warton,  John Dryden,  Jonathan Swift,  Alexander Pope,  William Cowper,  John Fletcher, Francis Beaumont,  Walter Scott,  Stendhal


Joseph Warton
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joseph+Warton ,  

*            "William Lisle Bowles"  >>  ("Joseph Warton" /T)/P

>>     a few years later, Joseph's younger brother, the more famous Thomas Warton, was born.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Thomas+Warton ,  
*            "William Lisle Bowles"  >>  ("Joseph Warton" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Warton" /T/Ch)/P

>>                  John Dryden

"John Dryden"                (J/GC/S/abT + "-oseph Warton"/S)/Ch                  "Joseph Warton"

>>                he was a friend of Samuel Johnson.

"Samuel Johnson"                (J/GC/S/abT + "-oseph Warton"/S)                  "Joseph Warton"



John Dryden
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Dryden ,    

"John Dryden"                (J/GC/S/abT + "-oseph Warton"/S)/Ch                  "Joseph Warton"

*                 "John Dryden"  >>  Dryden /T

Born                     9 August 1631         Aldwincle, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England
Died                  1 May 1700 (aged 68)                        London, England

"1631"                         (J/P + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/+bp                         "John Dryden"
August                         (J/P + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/+cp                         "John Dryden"
"9"                         (J/P + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/Ch/+bp                         "John Dryden"
"Aldwincle, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England"              (J/P + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/Ch/+cp               "John Dryden"

"1700"                         (J/S + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/+bp                         "John Dryden"
May                            (J/S + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/+cp                         "John Dryden"
"1"                         (J/S + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/Ch/+bp                         "John Dryden"
"London, England"                 (J/S + "-ohn Dryden"/T)/Ch/+cp                  "John Dryden"

>>    who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden.   Walter Scott named him "Glorious John."

"Age of Dryden"               (R/S + "-estoration England"/T)/Ch                 "Restoration England"

*                 "Age of Dryden"  >>  ("Glorious John" /P)/C1

*                 "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1

>>                 also a second cousin once removed of Jonathan Swift

*          "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1

>>    Westminster School as a King’s Scholar where his headmaster was Dr Richard Busby,
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Richard+Busby ,    
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1

>> the Master of Trinity was a Puritan preacher by the name of Thomas Hill who had been a rector in Dryden’s home village
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Thomas+Hill+(Cambridge) ,    
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1

>>          Dryden procured work with Cromwell’s Secretary of State, John Thurloe
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Thurloe ,  
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1

>>        influence exercised on his behalf by the Lord Chamberlain, Sir Gilbert Pickering
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Gilbert+Pickering ,  
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1

>>   and the return of Charles II with Astraea Redux, an authentic royalist panegyric.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Astraea+Redux ,  
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Astraea Redux" /T)/C1

>>              married the royalist sister of Sir Robert Howard
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Robert+Howard+(playwright) ,  
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Astraea Redux" /T)/C1  >>  ("Robert Howard" /T/Ch/+bp)/C1

>>              hired by John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Wilmot%2c+2nd+Earl+of+Rochester ,    
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Astraea Redux" /T)/C1  >>  ("Robert Howard" /T/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("John Wilmot" /T/Ch/+cp)/C1

>>                    attack on the playwright Thomas Shadwell.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Thomas+Shadwell ,    
* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Astraea Redux" /T)/C1  >>  ("Robert Howard" /T/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("John Wilmot" /T/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Shadwell" /S)/C1

>>                   George Crabbe

* "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  ("Jonathan Swift" /P/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Richard Busby" /P/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Hill" /GC/S/abT)/C1  >>  ("John Thurloe" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("Gilbert Pickering" /GC/S/abT/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Astraea Redux" /T)/C1  >>  ("Robert Howard" /T/Ch/+bp)/C1  >>  ("John Wilmot" /T/Ch/+cp)/C1  >>  ("Thomas Shadwell" /S)/C1  >>  ("George Crabbe" /S/Ch/+bp)/C1


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d#a807 ,  
•  The Aeneid
English (English) (as Translator)
•  All for Love
Or, the World Well Lost
A Tragedy (English) (as Author)
•  Discourses on Satire and on Epic Poetry (English) (as Author)
•  His Majesties Declaration Defended (English) (as Author)

Aeneid                  (J/C2 + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)                  "John Dryden's writing"

"All for Love"               (J/S + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)                "John Dryden's writing"
"World Well Lost"              (J/S + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)/Ch               "John Dryden's writing"

"Discourses on Satire and on Epic Poetry"               (J/T + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)                "John Dryden's writing"
"His Majesties Declaration Defended"              (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)               "John Dryden's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/troilus_cressida/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida"

Aeneid                    (Tr/C2 + "-oilus and Cressida"/P)                   "Troilus and Cressida"
"All for Love"                 (Tr/S + "-oilus and Cressida"/P)                 "Troilus and Cressida"
"Discourses on Satire and on Epic Poetry"               (Tr/T + "-oilus and Cressida"/P)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"His Majesties Declaration Defended"              (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-oilus and Cressida"/P)               "Troilus and Cressida"

•  Palamon and Arcite (English) (as Author)
•  The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 1
With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes (English) (as Author)
•  The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 2
With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes (English) (as Author)
•  Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books
with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations (English) (as Contributor)

"Palamon and Arcite"               (J/T + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)                "John Dryden's writing"

"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books"               (J/P + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)                "John Dryden's writing"
"with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations"               (J/P + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "John Dryden's writing"

"Poetical Works of John Dryden, V o l i"               (J/C2 + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)                "John Dryden's writing"
"With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes"               (J/C2 + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "John Dryden's writing"

"Poetical Works of John Dryden, V o l i i"               (J/S + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)                "John Dryden's writing"
"With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes"               (J/S + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                "John Dryden's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/troilus_cressida/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida"

"Palamon and Arcite"               (Tr/T + "-oilus and Cressida"/GC/S/abT)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books"               (Tr/P + "-oilus and Cressida"/GC/S/abT)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"Poetical Works of John Dryden, V o l  i"               (Tr/C2 + "-oilus and Cressida"/GC/S/abT)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"Poetical Works of John Dryden, V o l  i i"               (Tr/S + "-oilus and Cressida"/GC/S/abT)                "Troilus and Cressida"

•  Selections from Five English Poets (English) (as Contributor)

•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 02 (English) (as Author)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 04 (English) (as Author)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 05 (English) (as Author)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 06 (English) (as Author)

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  i i"               (J/T + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/C2)                "John Dryden's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  i v"               (J/P + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/C2)                "John Dryden's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v"               (J/S + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/C2)                "John Dryden's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v i"               (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/C2)                "John Dryden's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/troilus_cressida/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida"

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  i i"               (Tr/T + "-oilus and Cressida"/C2)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  i v"               (Tr/P + "-oilus and Cressida"/C2)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v"               (Tr/S + "-oilus and Cressida"/C2)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v i"               (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-oilus and Cressida"/C2)                "Troilus and Cressida"

•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 07 (English) (as Author)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 16 (English) (as Author)

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v i i"               (J/P + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/S)                "John Dryden's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  x v i"               (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/S)                "John Dryden's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/troilus_cressida/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Troilus and Cressida"

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  v i i"               (Tr/P + "-oilus and Cressida"/S)                "Troilus and Cressida"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  x v i"               (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-oilus and Cressida"/S)                "Troilus and Cressida"



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between   John Dryden's  or  Virgil's   "The Aeneid"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Troilus and Cressida"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/troilus_cressida/full.html ,  
Troilus and Cressida

ACT I
PROLOGUE
In Troy, there lies the scene. From isles of Greece
The princes orgulous, their high blood chafed,
Have to the port of Athens sent their ships,
Fraught with the ministers and instruments
Of cruel war: sixty and nine, that wore
Their crownets regal, from the Athenian bay
Put forth toward Phrygia; and their vow is made
To ransack Troy, within whose strong immures
The ravish'd Helen, Menelaus' queen,
With wanton Paris sleeps; and that's the quarrel.
To Tenedos they come;
And the deep-drawing barks do there disgorge
Their warlike fraughtage: now on Dardan plains
The fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch
Their brave pavilions: Priam's six-gated city,
Dardan, and Tymbria, Helias, Chetas, Troien,
And Antenorides, ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/228/228-h/228-h.htm ,  
The Aeneid

BOOK I

Arms, and the man I sing, who, forc'd by fate,
And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate,
Expell'd and exil'd, left the Trojan shore.
Long labors, both by sea and land, he bore,
And in the doubtful war, before he won
The Latian realm, and built the destin'd town;
His banish'd gods restor'd to rites divine,
And settled sure succession in his line,
From whence the race of Alban fathers come,
And the long glories of majestic Rome.

O Muse! the causes and the crimes relate;
What goddess was provok'd, and whence her hate;
For what offense the Queen of Heav'n began
To persecute so brave, so just a man;
Involv'd his anxious life in endless cares,
Expos'd to wants, and hurried into wars! ~ ~


Aeneid                  (J/C2 + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/P)                  "John Dryden's writing"

Aeneid                              (V/C1 + "-irgil's work"/S)                         "Virgil's work"

*       While taking Korea/Seoul speaking posture (as coarticulation posture);   if articulating (or trying to speak)    "증일아함경 [z=ŋ  ŋil  ŋa  ham  gyΛŋ] 增壹阿含经"   from Korea/함경-도 [ham  gyΛŋ  do/province] (dialect) /S speaking posture,     "Aeneid [ŋA  ŋe  ne  ŋi  d=]/+bp"   or   "Bucolica [Bu  co  li  ca]/+cp"  or  "Bucolics and Eclogues [Bu  co  li  c=  s=  a  n=  d=  E  c=  lo  gu  e  s=]/+bp/Ch"   or   "Georgics [Ge  o  r=  gi  c=  s=]/+cp/Ch"   is metaphthong/MPh pronounced.

Aeneid                    (Tr/C2 + "-oilus and Cressida"/P)                   "Troilus and Cressida"


1.
"BOOK i Arms"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i PROLOGUE In Troy"/P)                  "ACT i PROLOGUE In Troy"

2                         there lies <the> scene --- and <the> man I sing

"and man I sing"                   (th/C2 + "-ere lies scene"/P)                   "there lies scene"

3.                          From isles of Greece <The> princes orgulous

who                 (Fr/C2 + "-om isles of Greece princes orgulous"/P)                  "From isles of Greece princes orgulous"

4.
"forc'd by fate"                 (th/C2 + "-eir high blood chafed"/P)                  "their high blood chafed"

5.                   Have to <the> port of Athens sent their ships

"And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate"                 (H/C2 + "-ave to port of Athens sent their ships"/P)                  "Have to port of Athens sent their ships"

6.               Fraught with <the> ministers and instruments Of cruel war

"Expell'd and exil'd"                 (Fr/C2 + "-aught with ministers and instruments Of cruel war"/P)                  "Fraught with ministers and instruments Of cruel war"

7.                        left <the> Trojan shore

"left Trojan shore"                    (s/C2 + "-ixty and nine"/P)                    "sixty and nine"

8.
"Long labors"                 (th/C2 + "-at wore Their crownets regal"/P)                  "that wore Their crownets regal"

9.                from <the> Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia

"both by sea and land"                 (fr/C2 + "-om Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia"/P)                  "from Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia"

10.
"he bore"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and their vow is made To ransack Troy"/P)                  "and their vow is made To ransack Troy"

11.           within whose strong immures <The> ravish'd Helen --- And in <the> doubtful war

"And in doubtful war"                 (w/C2 + "-ithin whose strong immures ravish'd Helen"/P)                  "within whose strong immures ravish'd Helen"

12.                     before he won <The> Latian realm

"before he won Latian realm"                 (M/C2 + "-enelaus' queen"/P)                  "Menelaus' queen"

13.                     and built <the> destin'd town

"and built destin'd town"                 (W/C2 + "-ith wanton Paris sleeps"/P)                  "With wanton Paris sleeps"

14.                     and that's <the> quarrel

"His banish'd gods restor'd to rites divine"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and that's quarrel"/P)                  "and that's quarrel"

15.
"And settled sure succession in his line"                 (T/C2 + "-o Tenedos they come"/P)                  "To Tenedos they come"

16.                And <the> deep --- From whence <the> race of Alban fathers come

"From whence race of Alban fathers come"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And deep"/P)                  "And deep"

17.                  And <the> long glories of majestic Rome

"And long glories of majestic Rome"                 (dr/C2 + "-awing barks do there disgorge Their warlike fraughtage"/P)                  "drawing barks do there disgorge Their warlike fraughtage"

18.     now on Dardan plains <The> fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions

"O Muse"                 (n/C2 + "-ow on Dardan plains fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions"/P)                  "now on Dardan plains fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions"

19.                 <the> causes and <the> crimes relate

"causes and crimes relate"                   (Pr/C2 + "-iam's six"/P)                   "Priam's six"

20.
"What goddess was provok'd"                  (g/C2 + "-ated city"/P)                   "gated city"

21.
"and whence her hate"                           (D/C2 + ardan/P)                          Dardan

22.                  For what offense <the> Queen of Heav'n began To persecute so brave

"For what offense Queen of Heav'n began To persecute so brave"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and Tymbria"/P)                  "and Tymbria"

23.                   so just <a> man

"so just man"                                   (H/C2 + elias/P)                              Helias

22.
"Involv'd his anxious life in endless cares"                 (Ch/C2 + etas/P)                  Chetas

23.
"Expos'd to wants"                              (Tr/C2 + oien/P)                              Troien

24.
"and hurried into wars"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And Antenorides"/P)                  "And Antenorides"

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   John Dryden's  "The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 16"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Troilus and Cressida"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14947/14947-h/14947-h.htm ,  
The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 16

THE LIFE OF ST FRANCIS XAVIER,
OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS,
APOSTLE OF THE INDIES, AND OF JAPAN.

TO THE QUEEN.

MADAM,

The reverend author of this life, in his dedication to his Most Christian Majesty, affirms, that France was owing for him to the intercession of St Francis Xavier. That Anne of Austria, his mother, after twenty years of barrenness, had recourse to heaven, by her fervent prayers, to draw down that blessing, and addressed her devotions, in a particular manner, to this holy apostle of the Indies. I know not, madam, whether I may presume to tell the world, that your majesty has chosen this great saint for one of your celestial patrons, though I am sure you will never be ashamed of owning so glorious an intercessor; not even in a country where the doctrine of the holy church is questioned, and those religious addresses ridiculed. ~ ~


"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  x v i"               (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Dryden's writing"/S)                "John Dryden's writing"

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. v o l  x v i"               (Tr/GC/S/abT + "-oilus and Cressida"/S)                "Troilus and Cressida"


1.               <THE> LIFE OF ST FRANCIS XAVIER

"LIFE OF S T FRANCIS XAVIER"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "ACT i PROLOGUE In Troy"/S)                  "ACT i PROLOGUE In Troy"

2                         there lies <the> scene --- OF <THE> SOCIETY OF JESUS

"OF SOCIETY OF JESUS"               (th/GC/S/abT + "-ere lies scene"/S)                "there lies scene"

3.                     From isles of Greece <The> princes orgulous --- APOSTLE OF <THE> INDIES

"APOSTLE OF INDIES"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-om isles of Greece princes orgulous"/S)                  "From isles of Greece princes orgulous"

4.
"AND OF JAPAN"                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-eir high blood chafed"/S)                  "their high blood chafed"

5.               Have to <the> port of Athens sent their ships --- TO <THE> QUEEN

"TO QUEEN"                 (H/GC/S/abT + "-ave to port of Athens sent their ships"/S)                  "Have to port of Athens sent their ships"

6.               Fraught with <the> ministers and instruments Of cruel war

MADAM                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-aught with ministers and instruments Of cruel war"/S)                  "Fraught with ministers and instruments Of cruel war"

7.                      <The> reverend author of this life

"reverend author of this life"               (s/GC/S/abT + "-ixty and nine"/S)               "sixty and nine"

8.
"in his dedication to his Most Christian Majesty"                 (th/GC/S/abT + "-at wore Their crownets regal"/S)                  "that wore Their crownets regal"

9.                from <the> Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia

affirms                (fr/GC/S/abT + "-om Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia"/S)                  "from Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia"

10.               that France was owing for him to <the> intercession of S t Francis Xavier

"that France was owing for him to intercession of S t Francis Xavier"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and their vow is made To ransack Troy"/S)                  "and their vow is made To ransack Troy"

11.               within whose strong immures <The> ravish'd Helen

"That Anne of Austria"                 (w/GC/S/abT + "-ithin whose strong immures ravish'd Helen"/S)                  "within whose strong immures ravish'd Helen"

12.
"his mother"                 (M/GC/S/abT + "-enelaus' queen"/S)                  "Menelaus' queen"

13.
"after twenty years of barrenness"                 (W/GC/S/abT + "-ith wanton Paris sleeps"/S)                  "With wanton Paris sleeps"

14.                     and that's <the> quarrel

"had recourse to heaven"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and that's quarrel"/S)                  "and that's quarrel"

15.
"by her fervent prayers"                 (T/GC/S/abT + "-o Tenedos they come"/S)                  "To Tenedos they come"

16.                   And <the> deep

"to draw down that blessing"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "And deep"/S)                  "And deep"

17.
"and addressed her devotions"                 (dr/GC/S/abT + "-awing barks do there disgorge Their warlike fraughtage"/S)                  "drawing barks do there disgorge Their warlike fraughtage"

18. now on Dardan plains <The> fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions --- in <a> particular manner

"in particular manner"                 (n/GC/S/abT + "-ow on Dardan plains fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions"/S)                  "now on Dardan plains fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions"

19.                         to this holy apostle of <the> Indies

"to this holy apostle of Indies"                (Pr/GC/S/abT + "-iam's six"/S)                "Priam's six"

20.
"I know not"                      (g/GC/S/abT + "-ated city"/S)                       "gated city"

21.
madam                               (D/GC/S/abT + ardan/S)                             Dardan

22.                      whether I may presume to tell <the> world

"whether I may presume to tell world"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "and Tymbria"/S)                  "and Tymbria"

23.
"that your majesty has chosen this great saint for one of your celestial patrons"                (H/GC/S/abT + elias/S)               Helias

22.            though I am sure you will never be ashamed of owning so glorious <an> intercessor

"though I am sure you will never be ashamed of owning so glorious intercessor"                (Ch/GC/S/abT + etas/S)                 Chetas

23.             not even in <a> country where <the> doctrine of <the> holy church is questioned

"not even in country where doctrine of holy church is questioned"                 (Tr/GC/S/abT + oien/S)                Troien

24.
"and those religious addresses ridiculed"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/GC/S/abT + "And Antenorides"/S)                  "And Antenorides"

Et cetera.



Jonathan Swift
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Jonathan+Swift ,  

"Jonathan Swift"                    (J/T + "-ohn Dryden"/P)/Ch                      "John Dryden"

>>     Dean Swift,   Swift

*         "Jonathan Swift"  >>  Swift /T  >>  "Dean Swift" /C2

Born                                30 November 1667                           Dublin, Ireland
Died                             19 October 1745 (aged 77)                         Ireland

"1667"                   (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/S)/+bp                  "Jonathan Swift"
November                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/S)/+cp                 "Jonathan Swift"
"30"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/S)/Ch/+bp                  "Jonathan Swift"
"Dublin, Ireland"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Jonathan Swift"

"1745"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/C2)/+bp                  "Jonathan Swift"
October                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/C2)/+cp                  "Jonathan Swift"
"19"                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/C2)/Ch/+bp                  "Jonathan Swift"
Ireland                  (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/C2)/Ch/+cp                  "Jonathan Swift"

>>               pseudonyms—such as Lemuel Gulliver,  Isaac Bickerstaff,  M.B. Drapier

* "Jonathan Swift"  >>  ("Lemuel Gulliver" /T/Ch/+cp)/C2  >>  ("Isaac Bickerstaff" /T)/C2  >>  ("M.B. Drapier" /T/Ch/+bp)/C2

>>      lifelong friendships with Alexander Pope, John Gay, and John Arbuthnot, forming the core of the Martinus Scriblerus Club (founded in 1713)

* "Jonathan Swift"  >>  ("Alexander Pope" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("John Gay" /P/+bp)/S  >>  ("John Arbuthnot" /P/+cp)/S

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Scriblerus+Club ,  
The Scriblerus Club was an informal group of friends that included Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, John Arbuthnot, Henry St. John and Thomas Parnell.

"Scriblerus Club"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift"/P)/Ch                 "Jonathan Swift"
"Scriblerus Club"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/P)/Ch                 "Alexander Pope"
"Scriblerus Club"                         (J/C2 + "-ohn Gay"/P)/Ch                      "John Gay"
"Scriblerus Club"                   (J/C2 + "-ohn Arbuthnot"/P)/Ch                 "John Arbuthnot"
"Scriblerus Club"                   (H/C2 + "-enry S t John"/P)/Ch                 "Henry S t John"
"Scriblerus Club"                   (Th/C2 + "-omas Parnell"/P)/Ch                 "Thomas Parnell"

*                    "Scriblerus Club"  >>  "Martinus Scriblerus Club" /C1/Ch


>>    Henry St. John (Viscount Bolingbroke) the secretary of state for foreign affairs (1710–15)

* "Jonathan Swift"  >>  ("Alexander Pope" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("John Gay" /P/+bp)/S  >>  ("John Arbuthnot" /P/+cp)/S  >>  ("Henry S t John" /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P

>>   Another lady with whom he had a close but less intense relationship was Anne Long, a toast of the Kit-Cat Club
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Anne+Long+(c.1681-1711) ,  

"Anne Long"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift"/P)/+cp/Ch                 "Jonathan Swift"

"toast of Kit-Cat Club"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift"/P)/+bp/Ch                 "Jonathan Swift"


>>                    Sir William Temple, Swift's patron,
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Sir+William+Temple%2c+1st+Baronet ,  
"William Temple"                   (J/GC/S/abT + "-onathan Swift"/P)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift"

>>                      William Wotton
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Wotton ,  
"William Wotton"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift"/P)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift"

>>                      Richard Bentley
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Richard+Bentley ,  
"Richard Bentley"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift"

>>                    In 1708, a cobbler named John Partridge
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Partridge+(astrologer) ,  
"John Partridge"                   (J/P + "-onathan Swift"/C1)                  "Jonathan Swift"

>> a series of pamphlets against the monopoly granted by the English government to William Wood to provide the Irish with copper coinage
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Wood+(Mintmaster) ,  
"William Wood"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift"/C1)                  "Jonathan Swift"


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a326 ,  
•  The Battle of the Books and other Short Pieces (English) (as Author)
•  Bickerstaff-Partridge Papers (English) (as Author)
•  Gulliver's Reis Naar Liliput (Dutch) (as Author)
•  Gulliver's Reizen
naar Lilliput en Brobdingnag (Dutch) (as Author)

"Battle of Books and other Short Pieces"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Bickerstaff-Partridge Papers"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift's writing"/S)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Gulliver's Reis Naar Liliput"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift's writing"/C2)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Gulliver's Reizen"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift"
"naar Lilliput en Brobdingnag"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/Poetry/LoversComplaint.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "A Lover's Complaint"

"Battle of Books and other Short Pieces"                   (L/T + "-over's Complaint"/P)                  "Lover's Complaint"
"Bickerstaff-Partridge Papers"                   (L/T + "-over's Complaint"/S)                  "Lover's Complaint"
"Gulliver's Reis Naar Liliput"                   (L/T + "-over's Complaint"/C2)                  "Lover's Complaint"
"Gulliver's Reizen"                   (L/T + "-over's Complaint"/GC/S/abT)                  "Lover's Complaint"

•  Gulliver's Travels (English) (as Author)
•  Gulliver's Travels
Into Several Remote Regions of the World (English) (as Author)
•  Ireland in the Days of Dean Swift
Irish Tracts, 1720 to 1734 (English) (as Author)
•  The Journal to Stella (English) (as Author)

"Gulliver's Travels"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Gulliver's Travels"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Into Several Remote Regions of World"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Ireland in Days of Dean Swift"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/C2)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Irish Tracts, 1720 to 1734"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/C2)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Journal to Stella"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cleopatra/full.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "Antony and Cleopatra"

"Gulliver's Travels"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/T)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"
"Gulliver's Travels"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/P)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"
"Ireland in Days of Dean Swift"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/C2)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"
"Journal to Stella"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/GC/S/abT)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"

•  A Modest Proposal (English) (as Author)
•  The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume 1 (English) (as Author)
•  The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume 2 (English) (as Author)
•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 03
Swift's Writings on Religion and the Church — Volume 1 (English) (as Author)

"Modest Proposal"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume i"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume i i"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/S)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume i i i"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Swift's Writings on Religion and Church — Volume i"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/richardiii/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Richard III"

"Modest Proposal"                       (R/C1 + "-ichard i i i"/T)                       "Richard i i i"
"Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume i"                   (R/C1 + "-ichard i i i"/P)                  "Richard i i i"
"Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume i i"                   (R/C1 + "-ichard i i i"/S)                  "Richard i i i"
"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume i i i"                   (R/C1 + "-ichard i i i"/GC/S/abT)                  "Richard i i i"

•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 04
Swift's Writings on Religion and the Church — Volume 2 (English) (as Author)
•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 06
The Drapier's Letters (English) (as Author)
•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. - Volume 07
Historical and Political Tracts-Irish (English) (as Author)
•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 09
Contributions to The Tatler, The Examiner, The Spectator, and The Intelligencer (English) (as Author)

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 i v"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Swift's Writings on Religion and Church — Volume i i"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 v i"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Drapier's Letters"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 v i i"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/S)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Historical and Political Tracts-Irish"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/S)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 i x"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Contributions to Tatler, Examiner, Spectator, and Intelligencer"                   (J/C2 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/henryv/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Henry V"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 i v"                   (H/C2 + "-enry v"/T)                  "Henry v"
"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 v i"                   (H/C2 + "-enry v"/P)                  "Henry v"
"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 v i i"                   (H/C2 + "-enry v"/S)                  "Henry v"
"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 0 i x"                   (H/C2 + "-enry v"/GC/S/abT)                  "Henry v"

•  The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 10
Historical Writings (English) (as Author)
•  A Tale of a Tub (English) (as Author)
•  Three Sermons: I. on mutual subjection. II. on conscience. III. on the trinity (English) (as Author)
•  Les Voyages de Gulliver (French) (as Author)

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume x"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Historical Writings"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Tale of Tub"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Three Sermons: i. on mutual subjection. i i. on conscience. i i i. on the trinity"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/C2)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Voyages de Gulliver"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/asyoulikeit/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "As You Like It"

"Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume x"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As You Like It"/T)                  "As You Like It"
"Tale of Tub"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As You Like It"/P)                  "As You Like It"
"Three Sermons: i. on mutual subjection. i i. on conscience. i i i. on the trinity"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As You Like It"/C2)                  "As You Like It"
"Voyages de Gulliver"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As You Like It"/GC/S/abT)                  "As You Like It"



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   Jonathan Swift's  "The Battle of the Books and other Short Pieces"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Lover's Complaint"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/Poetry/LoversComplaint.html ,  
A Lover's Complaint

FROM off a hill whose concave womb reworded
A plaintful story from a sistering vale,
My spirits to attend this double voice accorded,
And down I laid to list the sad-tuned tale;
Ere long espied a fickle maid full pale,
Tearing of papers, breaking rings a-twain,
Storming her world with sorrow's wind and rain.

Upon her head a platted hive of straw,
Which fortified her visage from the sun,
Whereon the thought might think sometime it saw
The carcass of beauty spent and done:
Time had not scythed all that youth begun,
Nor youth all quit; but, spite of heaven's fell rage,
Some beauty peep'd through lattice of sear'd age. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/623/623-h/623-h.htm ,  
The Battle of the Books and other Short Pieces

THE PREFACE OF THE AUTHOR.

Satire is a sort of glass wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind reception it meets with in the world, and that so very few are offended with it.  But, if it should happen otherwise, the danger is not great; and I have learned from long experience never to apprehend mischief from those understandings I have been able to provoke: for anger and fury, though they add strength to the sinews of the body, yet are found to relax those of the mind, and to render all its efforts feeble and impotent.

There is a brain that will endure but one scumming; let the owner gather it with discretion, and manage his little stock with husbandry; but, of all things, ~ ~


"Battle of Books and other Short Pieces"                   (J/T + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Battle of Books and other Short Pieces"                   (L/T + "-over's Complaint"/P)                  "Lover's Complaint"


1. FROM off <a> hill whose concave womb reworded <A> plaintful story from <a> sistering vale --- <THE> PREFACE OF <THE> AUTHOR

"PREFACE OF AUTHOR"                   (FR/T + "-OM off hill whose concave womb reworded plaintful story from sistering vale"/P)                  "FROM off hill whose concave womb reworded plaintful story from sistering vale "

2.     Satire is <a> sort of glass wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own

"Satire is sort of glass wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own"                   ("My sp"/T + "-irits to attend this double voice accorded"/P)                  "My spirits to attend this double voice accorded"

3. And down I laid to list <the> sad --- which is <the> chief reason for that kind reception it meets with in <the> world

"which is chief reason for that kind reception it meets with in world"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "And down I laid to list sad"/P)                  "And down I laid to list sad"

4.
"and that so very few are offended with it"                   (t/T + "-uned tale"/P)                  "tuned tale"

5.                 Ere long espied <a> fickle maid full pale

But                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Ere long espied fickle maid full pale"/P)                  "Ere long espied fickle maid full pale"

6.
"if it should happen otherwise"                   (T/T + "-earing of papers"/P)                  "Tearing of papers"

7.                    breaking rings <a> --- <the> danger is not great

"danger is not great"                    (br/T + "-eaking rings"/P)                  "breaking rings"

8.
"and I have learned from long experience never to apprehend mischief from those understandings I have been able to provoke"                   (tw/T + ain/P)                  twain

9.
"for anger and fury"                   (St/T + "-orming her world with sorrow's wind and rain"/P)                  "Storming her world with sorrow's wind and rain"

10.    Upon her head <a> platted hive of straw --- though they add strength to <the> sinews of <the> body

"though they add strength to sinews of body"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "Upon her head platted hive of straw"/P)                  "Upon her head platted hive of straw"

11.          Which fortified her visage from <the> sun --- yet are found to relax those of the mind

"yet are found to relax those of mind"                   (Wh/T + "-ich fortified her visage from sun"/P)                  "Which fortified her visage from sun"

12. Whereon <the> thought might think sometime it saw <The> carcass of beauty spent and done

"and to render all its efforts feeble and impotent"                   (Wh/T + "-ereon thought might think sometime it saw carcass of beauty spent and done"/P)                  "Whereon thought might think sometime it saw carcass of beauty spent and done"

13.                  There is <a> brain that will endure but one scumming

"There is brain that will endure but one scumming"                   (T/T + "-ime had not scythed all that youth begun"/P)                  "Time had not scythed all that youth begun"

14.                   let <the> owner gather it with discretion

"let owner gather it with discretion"                   (N/T + "-or youth all quit"/P)                  "Nor youth all quit"

15.
"and manage his little stock with husbandry"                     (b/T + ut/P)                    but

16.
but                   (sp/T + "-ite of heaven's fell rage"/P)                  "spite of heaven's fell rage"

17.
"of all things"                   (S/T + "-ome beauty peep'd through lattice of sear'd age"/P)                  "Some beauty peep'd through lattice of sear'd age"

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   Jonathan Swift's  "Gulliver's Travels"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Antony and Cleopatra"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cleopatra/full.html ,    
Antony and Cleopatra

ACT I
SCENE I. Alexandria. A room in CLEOPATRA's palace.

Enter DEMETRIUS and PHILO
PHILO
Nay, but this dotage of our general's
O'erflows the measure: those his goodly eyes,
That o'er the files and musters of the war
Have glow'd like plated Mars, now bend, now turn,
The office and devotion of their view
Upon a tawny front: his captain's heart,
Which in the scuffles of great fights hath burst
The buckles on his breast, reneges all temper,
And is become the bellows and the fan
To cool a gipsy's lust.

Flourish. Enter ANTONY, CLEOPATRA, her Ladies, the Train, with Eunuchs fanning her

Look, where they come:
Take but good note, and you shall see in him.
The triple pillar of the world transform'd
Into a strumpet's fool: behold and see.

CLEOPATRA
If it be love indeed, tell me how much. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/829/829-h/829-h.htm ,  
Gulliver's Travels

PART I.  A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT.
CHAPTER I.

The author gives some account of himself and family.  His first inducements to travel.  He is shipwrecked, and swims for his life.  Gets safe on shore in the country of Lilliput; is made a prisoner, and carried up the country.

My father had a small estate in Nottinghamshire: I was the third of five sons.  He sent me to Emanuel College in Cambridge at fourteen years old, where I resided three years, and applied myself close to my studies; but the charge of maintaining me, although I had a very scanty allowance, being too great for a narrow fortune, I was bound apprentice to Mr. James Bates, an eminent surgeon in London, with whom I continued four years.  My father now and then sending me small sums of money, I laid them out in learning navigation, and other parts of the mathematics, useful to those who intend to travel, as I always believed it would be, ~ ~


"Gulliver's Travels"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Gulliver's Travels"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/T)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"


1.
"PART i"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)                    "ACT i SCENE i"

2.                   <A> VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT

"VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT"                    ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Alexandria/T)                  Alexandria

3.                   <A> room in CLEOPATRA's palace

"CHAPTER i"                   (r/S + "-oom in CLEOPATRA's palace"/T)                  "room in CLEOPATRA's palace"

4.                <The> author gives some account of himself and family

"author gives some account of himself and family"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter DEMETRIUS and PHILO PHILO Nay"/T)                  "Enter DEMETRIUS and PHILO PHILO Nay"

5.                but this dotage of our general's O'erflows <the> measure

"His first inducements to travel"                   (b/S + "-ut this dotage of our general's O'erflows measure"/T)                  "but this dotage of our general's O'erflows measure"

6.
"He is shipwrecked"                   (th/S + "-ose his goodly eyes"/T)                  "those his goodly eyes"

7.               That o'er <the> files and musters of <the> war Have glow'd like plated Mars

"and swims for his life"                   (Th/S + "-at o'er files and musters of war Have glow'd like plated Mars"/T)                  "That o'er files and musters of war Have glow'd like plated Mars"

8.               Gets safe on shore in <the> country of Lilliput

"Gets safe on shore in country of Lilliput"                   (n/S + "-ow bend"/T)                  "now bend"

9.                         is made <a> prisoner

"is made prisoner"                          (n/S + "-ow turn"/T)                         "now turn"

10.     <The> office and devotion of their view Upon <a> tawny front --- and carried up <the> country

"and carried up country"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "office and devotion of their view Upon tawny front"/T)                  "office and devotion of their view Upon tawny front"

12.                My father had <a> small estate in Nottinghamshire

"My father had small estate in Nottinghamshire"                   (h/S + "-is captain's heart"/T)                  "his captain's heart"

13. Which in <the> scuffles of great fights hath burst <The> buckles on his breast --- I was <the> third of five sons

"I was third of five sons"                   (Wh/S + "-ich in scuffles of great fights hath burst buckles on his breast"/T)                  "Which in scuffles of great fights hath burst buckles on his breast"

14.
"He sent me to Emanuel College in Cambridge at fourteen years old"                   (r/S + "-eneges all temper"/T)                  "reneges all temper"

15.              And is become <the> bellows and <the> fan To cool <a> gipsy's lust

"where I resided three years"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "And is become bellows and fan To cool gipsy's lust"/T)                  "And is become bellows and fan To cool gipsy's lust"

16.
"and applied myself close to my studies"                   (F/S + lourish/T)                  Flourish

17.                  but <the> charge of maintaining me

"but charge of maintaining me"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter ANTONY"/T)                  "Enter ANTONY"

18.                  although I had <a> very scanty allowance

"although I had very scanty allowance"                   (C/S + LEOPATRA/T)                   CLEOPATRA

19.                  being too great for <a> narrow fortune

"being too great for narrow fortune"                   (h/S + "-er Ladies"/T)                  "her Ladies"

20.                    <the> Train

"I was bound apprentice to M r"                   (Tr/S + ain/T)                  Train

21.
"James Bates"                   (w/S + "-ith Eunuchs fanning her Look"/T)                  "with Eunuchs fanning her Look"

22.                   <an> eminent surgeon in London

"eminent surgeon in London"                   (wh/S + "-ere they come"/T)                  "where they come"

23.
"with whom I continued four years"                   (T/S + "-ake but good note"/T)                  "Take but good note"

24.
"My father now and then sending me small sums of money"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "and you shall see in him"/T)                  "and you shall see in him"

25.              <The> triple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool

"I laid them out in learning navigation"                   (tr/S + "-iple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool"/T)                  "triple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool"

26.                     and other parts of <the> mathematics

"and other parts of the mathematics"                   (b/S + "-ehold and see"/T)                  "behold and see"

27.
"useful to those who intend to travel"                   (C/S + "-LEOPATRA If it be love indeed"/T)                  "CLEOPATRA If it be love indeed"

28.
"as I always believed it would be"                   (t/S + "-ell me how much"/T)                  "tell me how much"

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   Jonathan Swift's  "Gulliver's Travels, Into Several Remote Regions of the World"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Antony and Cleopatra"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17157/17157-h/17157-h.htm ,  
•  Gulliver's Travels
Into Several Remote Regions of the World (English) (as Author)

PREFACE.

And lo! the book, from all its end beguiled, A harmless wonder to some happy child.

LORD LYTTON.

Gulliver's Travels was published in 1726; and, although it was by no means intended for them, the book was soon appropriated by the children, who have ever since continued to regard it as one of the most delightful of their story books. They cannot comprehend the occasion which provoked the book nor appreciate the satire which underlies the narrative, but they delight in the wonderful adventures, and wander full of open-eyed astonishment into the new worlds through which the vivid and logically accurate imagination of the author so personally conducts them. And there is a meaning and a moral in the stories of the Voyages to Lilliput and Brobdingnag which is entirely apart from the political satire they are intended to convey, a meaning and a moral which the youngest child who can read it will not fail to seize, and upon which it is scarcely necessary for the teacher to comment.

For young children the book combines in a measure the interest of Robinson Crusoe and that of the fairy tale; its style is objective, the narrative is simple, and the matter appeals strongly to the childish imagination. For more mature boys and girls and for adults the interest is found chiefly in the keen satire which underlies the narrative. It appeals, therefore, to a very wide range of intelligence and taste, and can be read with profit by the child of ten and by the young man or woman of mature years.

This edition is practically a reprint of the original (1726-27). The punctuation and capitalization have been modernized, some archaisms changed, and the paragraphs have been made more frequent. A few passages have been omitted which would offend modern ears and are unsuitable for children's reading, and some foot-notes have been added explaining obsolete words and obscure expressions.

As a reading book in school which must be adapted to the average mind, these stories will be found suitable for classes from the fifth or sixth school year to the highest grade of the grammar school.

THOMAS M. BALLIET.

CHAPTER I.

THE AUTHOR GIVES SOME ACCOUNT OF HIMSELF AND FAMILY: HIS FIRST INDUCEMENTS TO TRAVEL. HE IS SHIPWRECKED, AND SWIMS FOR HIS LIFE; GETS SAFE ASHORE IN THE COUNTRY OF LILLIPUT; IS MADE A PRISONER, AND CARRIED UP THE COUNTRY.

My father had a small estate in Nottinghamshire; ~ ~


"Gulliver's Travels"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"
"Into Several Remote Regions of World"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/P)/Ch                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cleopatra/full.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "Antony and Cleopatra"

"Gulliver's Travels"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Antony and Cleopatra"/P)                  "Antony and Cleopatra"


1.
PREFACE                      ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "ACT i SCENE i"/P)                    "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"And lo"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Alexandria/P)                          Alexandria

3.                   <A> room in CLEOPATRA's palace --- the book

book                   (r/S + "-oom in CLEOPATRA's palace"/P)                  "room in CLEOPATRA's palace"

4.
"from all its end beguiled"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter DEMETRIUS and PHILO PHILO Nay"/P)                  "Enter DEMETRIUS and PHILO PHILO Nay"

5. but this dotage of our general's O'erflows <the> measure --- <A> harmless wonder to some happy child

"harmless wonder to some happy child"                   (b/S + "-ut this dotage of our general's O'erflows measure"/P)                  "but this dotage of our general's O'erflows measure"

6.
"LORD LYTTON"                   (th/S + "-ose his goodly eyes"/P)                  "those his goodly eyes"

7.               That o'er <the> files and musters of <the> war Have glow'd like plated Mars

"Gulliver's Travels was published in 1726"                   (Th/S + "-at o'er files and musters of war Have glow'd like plated Mars"/P)                  "That o'er files and musters of war Have glow'd like plated Mars"

8.
and                                (n/S + "-ow bend"/P)                                "now bend"

9.
"although it was by no means intended for them"                  (n/S + "-ow turn"/P)                  "now turn"

10.     <The> office and devotion of their view Upon <a> tawny front --- <the> book was soon appropriated by <the> children

"book was soon appropriated by children"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "office and devotion of their view Upon tawny front"/P)                  "office and devotion of their view Upon tawny front"

12.      who have ever since continued to regard it as one of <the> most delightful of their story books

"who have ever since continued to regard it as one of most delightful of their story books"                   (h/S + "-is captain's heart"/P)                  "his captain's heart"

13. Which in <the> scuffles of great fights hath burst <The> buckles on his breast --- They cannot comprehend <the> occasion which provoked <the> book nor appreciate the satire which underlies <the> narrative

"They cannot comprehend occasion which provoked book nor appreciate satire which underlies narrative"                   (Wh/S + "-ich in scuffles of great fights hath burst buckles on his breast"/P)                  "Which in scuffles of great fights hath burst buckles on his breast"

14.                  but they delight in <the> wonderful adventures

"but they delight in wonderful adventures"                   (r/S + "-eneges all temper"/P)                  "reneges all temper"

15.              And is become <the> bellows and <the> fan To cool <a> gipsy's lust

"and wander full of open"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "And is become bellows and fan To cool gipsy's lust"/P)                  "And is become bellows and fan To cool gipsy's lust"

16. eyed astonishment into <the> new worlds through which <the> vivid and logically accurate imagination of <the> author so personally conducts them

"eyed astonishment into new worlds through which vivid and logically accurate imagination of author so personally conducts them"                   (F/S + lourish/P)                  Flourish

17. And there is <a> meaning and <a> moral in <the> stories of <the> Voyages to Lilliput and Brobdingnag which is entirely apart from <the> political satire they are intended to convey

"And there is meaning and moral in stories of Voyages to Lilliput and Brobdingnag which is entirely apart from political satire they are intended to convey"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter ANTONY"/P)                  "Enter ANTONY"

18.     <a> meaning and <a> moral which <the> youngest child who can read it will not fail to seize

"meaning and moral which youngest child who can read it will not fail to seize"                   (C/S + LEOPATRA/P)                   CLEOPATRA

19.                 and upon which it is scarcely necessary for <the> teacher to comment

"and upon which it is scarcely necessary for teacher to comment"                  (h/S + "-er Ladies"/P)                  "her Ladies"

20. <the> Train --- For young children <the> book combines in <a> measure <the> interest of Robinson Crusoe and that of <the> fairy tale

"For young children book combines in measure interest of Robinson Crusoe and that of fairy tale"                 (Tr/S + ain/P)                  Train

21.
"its style is objective"                   (w/S + "-ith Eunuchs fanning her Look"/P)                  "with Eunuchs fanning her Look"

22.                   <the> narrative is simple

"narrative is simple"                   (wh/S + "-ere they come"/P)                  "where they come"

23.                   and <the> matter appeals strongly to <the> childish imagination

"and matter appeals strongly to childish imagination"                   (T/S + "-ake but good note"/P)                  "Take but good note"

24. For more mature boys and girls and for adults <the> interest is found chiefly in <the> keen satire which underlies <the> narrative

"For more mature boys and girls and for adults interest is found chiefly in keen satire which underlies narrative"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "and you shall see in him"/P)                  "and you shall see in him"

25.              <The> triple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool

"It appeals"                   (tr/S + "-iple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool"/P)                  "triple pillar of <the> world transform'd Into <a> strumpet's fool"

26.
therefore                         (b/S + "-ehold and see"/P)                       "behold and see"

27.                      to <a> very wide range of intelligence and taste

"to very wide range of intelligence and taste"                   (C/S + "-LEOPATRA If it be love indeed"/P)                  "CLEOPATRA If it be love indeed"

28. and can be read with profit by <the> child of ten and by <the> young man or woman of mature years

"and can be read with profit by the child of ten and by the young man or woman of mature years"                   (t/S + "-ell me how much"/P)                  "tell me how much"

29. MARK ANTONY There's beggary in <the> love that can be reckon'd --- This edition is practically <a> reprint of <the> original

"This edition is practically reprint of original"                (M/S + "-ARK ANTONY There's beggary in love that can be reckon'd"/P)                  "MARK ANTONY There's beggary in love that can be reckon'd"

30.                    CLEOPATRA I'll set <a> bourn how far to be beloved

"1726"                (C/S + "-LEOPATRA I'll set bourn how far to be beloved"/P)                  "CLEOPATRA I'll set bourn how far to be beloved"

31.
"27"                (M/S + "-ARK ANTONY Then must thou needs find out new heaven"/P)                  "MARK ANTONY Then must thou needs find out new heaven"

32.                  <The> punctuation and capitalization have been modernized

"punctuation and capitalization have been modernized"                (n/S + "-ew earth"/P)                  "new earth"

33.                   Enter <an> Attendant Attendant News

"some archaisms changed"                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter Attendant Attendant News"/P)                  "Enter Attendant Attendant News"

34.                   and <the> paragraphs have been made more frequent

"and paragraphs have been made more frequent"                (my/S + "good lord"/P)                  "my good lord"

35. <A> few passages have been omitted which would offend modern ears and are unsuitable for children's reading

"few passages have been omitted which would offend modern ears and are unsuitable for children's reading"                (fr/S + "-om Rome"/P)                  "from Rome"

36.
"and some foot"                (M/S + "-ARK ANTONY Grates me"/P)                  "MARK ANTONY Grates me"

37.                   <the> sum

"notes have been added explaining obsolete words and obscure expressions"                (s/S + um/P)                  sum

38.              As <a> reading book in school which must be adapted to <the> average mind

"As reading book in school which must be adapted to average mind"                (C/S + "-LEOPATRA Nay"/P)                  "CLEOPATRA Nay"

39. these stories will be found suitable for classes from <the> fifth or sixth school year to <the> highest grade of <the> grammar school

"these stories will be found suitable for classes from fifth or sixth school year to highest grade of grammar school"                (h/S + "-ear them"/P)                  "hear them"

40.
"THOMAS M"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Antony/P)                            Antony

41.
BALLIET                 (F/S + "-ulvia perchance is angry"/P)                  "Fulvia perchance is angry"

42.
"CHAPTER i"                                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + or/P)                               or

43.  who knows If <the> scarce --- <THE> AUTHOR GIVES SOME ACCOUNT OF HIMSELF AND FAMILY

"AUTHOR GIVES SOME ACCOUNT OF HIMSELF AND FAMILY"                (wh/S + "-o knows If scarce"/P)                  "who knows If scarce"

44.
"HIS FIRST INDUCEMENTS TO TRAVEL"                (b/S + "-earded Caesar have not sent His powerful mandate to you"/P)                  "bearded Caesar have not sent His powerful mandate to you"

45.
"HE IS SHIPWRECKED"                           (D/S + "-o this"/P)                       "Do this"

46.
"AND SWIMS FOR HIS LIFE"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "or this"/P)                   "or this"

47.               GETS SAFE ASHORE IN <THE> COUNTRY OF LILLIPUT

"GETS SAFE ASHORE IN COUNTRY OF LILLIPUT"                (T/S + "-ake in that kingdom"/P)                  "Take in that kingdom"

48.                IS MADE <A> PRISONER

"IS MADE PRISONER"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "and enfranchise that"/P)                  "and enfranchise that"

49.
"AND CARRIED UP THE COUNTRY"                (P/S + "-erform 't"/P)                  "Perform 't"

50.                My father had <a> small estate in Nottinghamshire

"My father had small estate in Nottinghamshire"                (/S + "-or else we damn thee"/P)                  "or else we damn thee"

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   Jonathan Swift's  "A Modest Proposal"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Richard III"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/richardiii/full.html ,  
Richard III

ACT I
SCENE I. London. A street.

Enter GLOUCESTER, solus
GLOUCESTER
Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths;
Our bruised arms hung up for monuments;
Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings,
Our dreadful marches to delightful measures.
Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front;
And now, instead of mounting barded steeds
To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks,
Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass;
I, that am rudely stamp'd, and want love's majesty
To strut before a wanton ambling nymph;
I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion,
Cheated of feature by dissembling nature,
Deformed, unfinish'd, sent before my time
Into this breathing world, scarce half made up,
And that so lamely and unfashionable
That dogs bark at me as I halt by them;
Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time, ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1080/1080-h/1080-h.htm ,  
A Modest Proposal

For preventing the children of poor people in Ireland,
from being a burden on their parents or country,
and for making them beneficial to the publick.

by Dr. Jonathan Swift

1729

It is a melancholy object to those, ~ ~


"Modest Proposal"                   (J/C1 + "-onathan Swift's writing"/T)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Modest Proposal"                       (R/C1 + "-ichard i i i"/T)                       "Richard i i i"


1.
For                        ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)                      "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
preventing                                 (L/C1 + ondon/T)                                 London

3.          <A> street --- For preventing <the> children of poor people in Ireland

"children"                  (st/C1 + reet/T)                  street

4.
of                   ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "Enter GLOUCESTER"/T)                  "Enter GLOUCESTER"

5.     solus GLOUCESTER Now is <the> winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York

poor                  (s/C1 + "-olus GLOUCESTER Now is winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York"/T)                  "solus GLOUCESTER Now is winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York"

6.         And all <the> clouds that lour'd upon our house In <the> deep bosom of <the> ocean buried

people                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "And all clouds that lour'd upon our house In deep bosom of ocean buried"/T)                  "And all clouds that lour'd upon our house In deep bosom of ocean buried"

7.
in                  (N/C1 + "-ow are our brows bound with victorious wreaths"/T)                  "Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths"

8.
Ireland                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Our bruised arms hung up for monuments"/T)                  "Our bruised arms hung up for monuments"

9.
from                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings"/T)                  "Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings"

10.
being                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "Our dreadful marches to delightful measures"/T)                  "Our dreadful marches to delightful measures"

11.
burden                                       (Gr/C1 + im/T)                                   Grim

12.
on                  (v/C1 + "-isaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front"/T)                  "visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front"

13.
their                            ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "And now"/T)                           "And now"

14. instead of mounting barded steeds To fright <the> souls of fearful adversaries --- from being <a> burden on their parents or country

parents                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "instead of mounting barded steeds To fright souls of fearful adversaries"/T)                  "instead of mounting barded steeds To fright souls of fearful adversaries"

15.           He capers nimbly in <a> lady's chamber To <the> lascivious pleasing of <a> lute

or                  (H/C1 + "-e capers nimbly in lady's chamber To lascivious pleasing of lute"/T)                  "He capers nimbly in lady's chamber To lascivious pleasing of lute"

16.
country                                    (B/C1 + "-ut I"/T)                                 "But I"

17.
and                  (th/C1 + "-at am not shaped for sportive tricks"/T)                  "that am not shaped for sportive tricks"

18.                   Nor made to court <an> amorous looking

for                 (N/C1 + "-or made to court amorous looking"/T)                  "Nor made to court amorous looking"

19.
making                                  (g/C1 + "-lass; I"/T)                              "glass; I"

20.
them                                     (th/C1 + "-at am rudely stamp'd"/T)                            "that am rudely stamp'd"

21. and want love's majesty To strut before <a> wanton ambling nymph; I --- and for making them beneficial to <the> publick

beneficial                ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and want love's majesty To strut before wanton ambling nymph"/T)                "and want love's majesty To strut before wanton ambling nymph; I"

22.
to                  (th/C1 + "-at am curtail'd of this fair proportion"/T)                  "that am curtail'd of this fair proportion"

23.
publick                  (Ch/C1 + "-eated of feature by dissembling nature"/T)                  "Cheated of feature by dissembling nature"

24.
by                                      (D/C1 + eformed/T)                               Deformed

25.
"D r"                             ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + unfinish'd/T)                            unfinish'd

26.
Jonathan                  (s/C1 + "-ent before my time Into this breathing world"/T)                  "sent before my time Into this breathing world"

27.
Swift                     (s/C1 + "-carce half made up"/T)                   "scarce half made up"

38.
"1729"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I"/T)                  "And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I"

39.
It                ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + "in this weak piping time of peace"/T)                  "in this weak piping time of peace"

40.              Have no delight to pass away <the> time --- It is <a> melancholy object to those

is                   (H/C1 + "-ave no delight to pass away time"/T)                  "Have no delight to pass away time"

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   Jonathan Swift's  "Les Voyages de Gulliver (French)"    and   William Shakespeare's  "As You Like It"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/17640/pg17640.html ,  
•  Les Voyages de Gulliver (French)

VOYAGE À LILLIPUT

Chapitre I

L'auteur rend un compte succinct des premiers motifs qui le portèrent à voyager. Il fait naufrage et se sauve à la nage dans le pays de Lilliput. On l'enchaîne et on le conduit en cet état plus avant dans les terres.

Mon père, dont le bien, situé dans la province de Nottingham, était médiocre, avait cinq fils: j'étais le troisième, et il m'envoya au collège d'Emmanuel, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/asyoulikeit/full.html ,  
As You Like It

ACT I

SCENE I. Orchard of Oliver's house.

Enter ORLANDO and ADAM

ORLANDO

As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion
bequeathed me by will but poor a thousand crowns,
and, as thou sayest, charged my brother, on his
blessing, to breed me well: and there begins my
sadness. My brother Jaques he keeps at school, ~ ~


"Voyages de Gulliver"                   (J/S + "-onathan Swift's writing"/GC/S/abT)                  "Jonathan Swift's writing"

"Voyages de Gulliver"                   ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "As You Like It"/GC/S/abT)                  "As You Like It"


1. VOYAGE À LILLIPUT Chapitre I <L'>auteur rend <un> compte succinct des premiers motifs qui <le> portèrent à voyager

"VOYAGE À LILLIPUT Chapitre i auteur rend compte succinct des premiers motifs qui portèrent à voyager"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "ACT i SCENE i"/GC/S/abT)                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.            Il fait naufrage et se sauve à <la> nage dans <le> pays de Lilliput

"Il fait naufrage et se sauve à nage dans pays de Lilliput"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Orchard of Oliver's house"/GC/S/abT)                 "Orchard of Oliver's house"

3.            On <l'>enchaîne et on <le> conduit en cet état plus avant dans <les> terres

"On enchaîne et on conduit en cet état plus avant dans terres"                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "Enter ORLANDO and ADAM ORLANDO As I remember"/GC/S/abT)                 "Enter ORLANDO and ADAM ORLANDO As I remember"

4.
"Mon père"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/S + Adam/GC/S/abT)                          Adam

5. it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will but poor <a> thousand crowns, and --- dont <le> bien

"dont bien"                ([ŋ=  y=]/S + "it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will but poor thousand crowns, and"/GC/S/abT)                 "it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will but poor thousand crowns, and"

6.                  situé dans <la> province de Nottingham

"situé dans province de Nottingham"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "as thou sayest"/GC/S/abT)                 "as thou sayest"

7.
"était médiocre"                (ch/S + "-arged my brother"/GC/S/abT)                 "charged my brother"

8.
"avait cinq fils"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "on his blessing"/GC/S/abT)                 "on his blessing"

9.                j'étais <le> troisième

"j'étais troisième"                (t/S + "-o breed me well"/GC/S/abT)                 "to breed me well"

10.
"et il m'envoya au collège d'Emmanuel"                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "and there begins my sadness"/GC/S/abT)                 "and there begins my sadness"

11.
"à Cambridge"                (My/S + "brother Jaques he keeps at school"/GC/S/abT)                 "My brother Jaques he keeps at school"

Et cetera.



Alexander Pope
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Alexander+Pope ,  

* "Jonathan Swift"  >>  ("Alexander Pope" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("John Gay" /P/+bp)/S  >>  ("John Arbuthnot" /P/+cp)/S

*                   ("Alexander Pope" /T/Ch)/P  >>  Pope /C2

Born                                 21 May 1688                          London
Died                            30 May 1744 (aged 56)

"1688"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/T)/+bp                  "Alexander Pope"
May                     ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/T)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope"
"21"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/T)/Ch/+bp                  "Alexander Pope"
London                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/T)/Ch/+cp                  "Alexander Pope"

"1744"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                  "Alexander Pope"
May                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope"
"30"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                  "Alexander Pope"

>>        William Wycherley,  William Congreve,  Samuel Garth,  William Trumbull

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Wycherley ,
"William Wycherley"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/P)                  "Alexander Pope"

"William Congreve"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/P)/Ch                  "Alexander Pope"

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Samuel+Garth ,  
"Samuel Garth"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/T)                  "Alexander Pope"

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Trumbull ,  
"William Trumbull"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/T)/Ch                  "Alexander Pope"

>>                 Thomas Parnell

"Thomas Parnell"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)                  "Alexander Pope"

>>                 Whig writers Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

"Joseph Addison"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  "Alexander Pope"

"Richard Steele"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                  "Alexander Pope"

>>                       Colley Cibber
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Colley+Cibber ,  

"Colley Cibber"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Alexander Pope"/S)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope"


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a907 ,    
•  La boucle de cheveux enlevée
Poème héroïcomique de Monsieur Pope (French) (as Author)
•  Epistola de Heloysa a Abaylard
composta no idioma Inglez por Pope (Portuguese) (as Author)
•  An Essay on Criticism (English) (as Author)
•  An Essay on Man (English) (as Author)

"boucle de cheveux enlevée"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/T)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"Poème héroïcomique de Monsieur Pope"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/T)/+cp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"

"Epistola de Heloysa a Abaylard"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/P)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"composta no idioma Inglez por Pope"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/P)/+cp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"

"Essay on Criticism"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/C2)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"Essay on Man"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "Alexander Pope's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1542/pg1542.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

"boucle de cheveux enlevée"                  (T/S + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/T)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Epistola de Heloysa a Abaylard"                  (T/S + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/P)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Essay on Criticism"                  (T/S + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/C2)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Essay on Man"                  (T/S + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"

•  The Iliad (English) (as Translator)
•  Memoir of Fr. Vincent De Paul; religious of La Trappe (English) (as Translator)
•  The Odyssey (English) (as Translator)
•  The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 1 (English) (as Author)

Iliad                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/T)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"Memoir of F r Vincent De Paul; religious of Trappe"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/P)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
Odyssey                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/S)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1542/pg1542.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

Iliad                      (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/T)/+cp                     "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Memoir of F r Vincent De Paul; religious of Trappe"                  (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/P)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
Odyssey                    (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/S)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i"                  (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"

•  The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 2 (English) (as Author)
•  The Rape of the Lock and Other Poems (English) (as Author)
•  The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 1
New Edition (English) (as Author)

"Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i i"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/T)/+cp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"Rape of Lock and Other Poems"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/S)/+cp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"

"Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/P)/+cp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"
"New Edition"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Alexander Pope's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1542/pg1542.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

"Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i i"                  (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/T)/+cp/Ch                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Rape of Lock and Other Poems"                  (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/S)/+cp/Ch                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"
"Works of Alexander Pope, Volume i"                  (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/P)/+cp/Ch                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"



>> Phonetic correspondence   between      Alexander Pope's   or    Homer's  "Iliad"    and   William Shakespeare's  "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

Iliad
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
BOOK I.

Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus' son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia's host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)5
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.

Who them to strife impell'd? What power divine?10
Latona's son and Jove's.[1] For he, incensed
004 Against the King, a foul contagion raised
In all the host, and multitudes destroy'd,
For that the son of Atreus had his priest
Dishonored, Chryses. To the fleet he came15
Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem
His daughter, and his hands charged with the wreath
And golden sceptre[2] of the God shaft-arm'd.

His supplication was at large to all
The host of Greece, but most of all to two,20
The sons of Atreus, highest in command. ~ ~


http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1542/pg1542.html ,    
The Two Noble Kinsmen

Presented at the Blackfriers by the Kings Maiesties servants, with great applause:

Written by the memorable Worthies of their time;

John Fletcher, Gent., and
William Shakspeare, Gent.

Actus Primus.

[Scaena 1.] (Athens. Before a temple.)

[Enter Hymen with a Torch burning: a Boy, in a white Robe before
 singing, and strewing Flowres: After Hymen, a Nimph, encompast
in
 her Tresses, bearing a wheaten Garland. Then Theseus betweene
 two other Nimphs with wheaten Chaplets on their heades. Then
 Hipolita the Bride, lead by Pirithous, and another holding a
 Garland over her head (her Tresses likewise hanging.) After
 her Emilia holding up her Traine. (Artesius and Attendants.)]

The Song, [Musike.]

Roses their sharpe spines being gon,
Not royall in their smels alone,
But in their hew.
Maiden Pinckes, of odour faint,
Dazies smel-lesse, yet most quaint
And sweet Time true.

Prim-rose first borne child of Ver,
Merry Spring times Herbinger, ~ ~


Homer                                ([ŋ=  y=]/P + Iliad/S)                                  Iliad
Homer                             ([ŋ=  w=]/P + Odyssey/S)                             Odyssey
Homer                                     (H/P + ymns/S)                                  Hymns


Iliad                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/T)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"

Iliad                   (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/T)/+cp                   "Two Noble Kinsmen"


1.                    Presented at <the> Blackfriers by <the> Kings Maiesties servants

"BOOK i"                  (Pr/C1 + "-esented at Blackfriers by Kings Maiesties servants"/T)/+cp                  "Presented at Blackfriers by Kings Maiesties servants"

2.
"Achilles sing"                  (w/C1 + "-ith great applause"/T)/+cp                  "with great applause"

3.                      Written by <the> memorable Worthies of their time

"O Goddess"                  (Wr/C1 + "-itten by memorable Worthies of their time"/T)/+cp                  "Written by memorable Worthies of their time"

4.
"Peleus' son"                  (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher, Gent"/T)/+cp                  "John Fletcher, Gent"

5.
"His wrath pernicious"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and William Shakspeare, Gent"/T)/+cp                  "and William Shakspeare, Gent"

6.                      Actus Primus. [Scaena 1.]

"who ten thousand woes Caused to Achaia's host"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Actus Primus Scaena i"/T)/+cp                  "Actus Primus Scaena i"

7.               sent many <a> soul Illustrious into Ades premature --- Athens. Before <a> temple

"sent many soul Illustrious into Ades premature"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Athens Before temple"/T)/+cp                  "Athens Before temple"

8.                          Enter Hymen with <a> Torch burning

"And Heroes gave"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + " Enter Hymen with Torch burning"/T)/+cp                  "Enter Hymen with Torch burning"

9.                     so stood <the> will of Jove --- <a> Boy, in <a> white Robe before singing

"so stood will of Jove"                  (B/C1 + "-oy, in white Robe before singing"/T)/+cp                  "Boy, in white Robe before singing"

10.                     To dogs and to all ravening fowls <a> prey

"To dogs and to all ravening fowls prey"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and strewing Flowres"/T)/+cp                  "and strewing Flowres"

11. When fierce dispute had separated once <The> noble Chief Achilles from <the> son Of Atreus --- After Hymen, <a> Nimph, encompast in her Tresses

"When fierce dispute had separated once noble Chief Achilles from son Of Atreus"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "After Hymen, Nimph, encompast in her Tresses"/T)/+cp                  "After Hymen, Nimph, encompast in her Tresses"

12.                       bearing <a> wheaten Garland

Agamemnon                  (b/C1 + "-earing wheaten Garland"/T)/+cp                  "bearing wheaten Garland"

13.
"King of men"                  (Th/C1 + "-en Theseus betweene two other Nimphs with wheaten Chaplets on their heades"/T)/+cp                  "Then Theseus betweene two other Nimphs with wheaten Chaplets on their heades"

14.                      Then Hipolita <the> Bride

"Who them to strife impell'd"                  (Th/C1 + "-en Hipolita Bride"/T)/+cp                  "Then Hipolita Bride"

15.
"What power divine"                  (l/C1 + "-ead by Pirithous"/T)/+cp                  "lead by Pirithous"

16.                     and another holding <a> Garland over her head

"Latona's son and Jove's"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and another holding Garland over her head"/T)/+cp                  "and another holding Garland over her head"

17.
"For he"                  (h/C1 + "-er Tresses likewise hanging"/T)/+cp                  "her Tresses likewise hanging"

18.                       incensed Against <the> King

"incensed Against King"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "After her Emilia holding up her Traine"/T)/+cp                  "After her Emilia holding up her Traine"

19.                  <a> foul contagion raised In all <the> host

"foul contagion raised In all host"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Artesius and Attendants"/T)/+cp                  "Artesius and Attendants"

20.                       <The> Song, [Musike.]

"and multitudes destroy'd"                  (S/C1 + "-ong Musike"/T)/+cp                  "Song Musike"

21.                       For that <the> son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored

"For that son of Atreus had his priest Dishonored"                  (R/C1 + "-oses their sharpe spines being gon"/T)/+cp                  "Roses their sharpe spines being gon"

22.
Chryses                  (N/C1 + "-ot royall in their smels alone"/T)/+cp                  "Not royall in their smels alone"

23.    To <the> fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter

"To fleet he came Bearing rich ransom glorious to redeem His daughter"                  (B/C1 + "-ut in their hew"/T)/+cp                  "But in their hew"

24.            and his hands charged with <the> wreath And golden sceptre of <the> God shaft

"and his hands charged with wreath And golden sceptre of God shaft"                  (M/C1 + "-aiden Pinckes, of odour faint"/T)/+cp                  "Maiden Pinckes, of odour faint"

25.
arm'd                          (D/C1 + "-azies smel"/T)/+cp                         "Dazies smel"

26.             His supplication was at large to all <The> host of Greece

"His supplication was at large to all host of Greece"                  (l/C1 + "-esse, yet most quaint And sweet Time true"/T)/+cp                  "lesse, yet most quaint And sweet Time true"

27.
"but most of all to two"                           (Pr/C1 + im/T)/+cp                          Prim

28.                      <The> sons of Atreus

"sons of Atreus"                  (r/C1 + "-ose first borne child of Ver"/T)/+cp                  "rose first borne child of Ver"

29.
"highest in command"                  (M/C1 + "-erry Spring times Herbinger"/T)/+cp                  "Merry Spring times Herbinger"

Et cetera.


>> Phonetic correspondence   between      Alexander Pope's   or    Homer's  "Odyssey"    and   William Shakespeare's  "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26275 ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/ ,  
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26275/26275-8.txt ,  
By Denton J. Snider,    Denton Jaques Snider
I.
The Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among the
suitors. She has taken the form of Mentes, the King of a neighboring
tribe; she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth.
Who will recognize her? Not the suitors; they can see no God in their
condition, least of all, the Goddess of Wisdom. "Telemachus was much
the first to observe her;" why just he? The fact is he was ready to see
her, and not only to see her, but to hear what she had to say. "For he
sat among the suitors grieved in heart, seeing his father in his mind's
eye," like Hamlet just before the latter saw the ghost. So careful is
the poet to prepare both sides--the divine epiphany, and the mortal who
is to behold it.

Furthermore, the young man saw his father "scattering the suitors and
himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house." This is just what
the Goddess is going to tell with a new sanction, and it is just what
is going to happen in the course of the poem. Truly Telemachus is
prepared internally; he has already everything within him which is to
come out of him. Throughout the whole interview the two main facts are
the example of the parent and the final revenge, both of which are
urged by the Goddess without and by the man within. ~ ~


Odyssey                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Alexander Pope's work"/S)/+cp                  "Alexander Pope's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1542/pg1542.html ,    
William Shakespeare's "The Two Noble Kinsmen"

Odyssey                    (T/C1 + "-wo Noble Kinsmen"/S)/+cp                  "Two Noble Kinsmen"


1. Presented at <the> Blackfriers by <the> Kings Maiesties servants --- <The> Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among <the> suitors

"Goddess Pallas has already come down to Ithaca and stands among suitors"                  (Pr/C1 + "-esented at Blackfriers by Kings Maiesties servants"/S)/+cp                  "Presented at Blackfriers by Kings Maiesties servants"

2.                   She has taken <the> form of Mentes

"She has taken form of Mentes"                  (w/C1 + "-ith great applause"/S)/+cp                  "with great applause"

3.     Written by <the> memorable Worthies of their time --- <the> King of <a> neighboring tribe

"King of neighboring tribe"                  (Wr/C1 + "-itten by memorable Worthies of their time"/S)/+cp                  "Written by memorable Worthies of their time"

4.
"she is in disguise as she usually is when she appears on earth"                  (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher, Gent"/S)/+cp                  "John Fletcher, Gent"

5.
"Who will recognize her"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and William Shakspeare, Gent"/S)/+cp                  "and William Shakspeare, Gent"

6.                      Actus Primus. [Scaena 1.] --- Not <the> suitors

"Not suitors"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Actus Primus Scaena i"/S)/+cp                  "Actus Primus Scaena i"

7.                Athens. Before <a> temple

"they can see no God in their condition"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Athens Before temple"/S)/+cp                  "Athens Before temple"

8.                          Enter Hymen with <a> Torch burning

"least of all"                  ([ŋ=  y=]/C1 + " Enter Hymen with Torch burning"/S)/+cp                  "Enter Hymen with Torch burning"

9.                <a> Boy, in <a> white Robe before singing --- <the> Goddess of Wisdom

"Goddess of Wisdom"                  (B/C1 + "-oy, in white Robe before singing"/S)/+cp                  "Boy, in white Robe before singing"

10.                    Telemachus was much <the> first to observe her

"Telemachus was much first to observe her"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and strewing Flowres"/S)/+cp                  "and strewing Flowres"

11.                    After Hymen, <a> Nimph, encompast in her Tresses

"why just he"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "After Hymen, Nimph, encompast in her Tresses"/S)/+cp                  "After Hymen, Nimph, encompast in her Tresses"

12.               bearing <a> wheaten Garland --- <The> fact is he was ready to see her

"fact is he was ready to see her"                 (b/C1 + "-earing wheaten Garland"/S)/+cp                  "bearing wheaten Garland"

13.
"and not only to see her"                  (Th/C1 + "-en Theseus betweene two other Nimphs with wheaten Chaplets on their heades"/S)/+cp                  "Then Theseus betweene two other Nimphs with wheaten Chaplets on their heades"

14.                      Then Hipolita <the> Bride

"but to hear what she had to say"                  (Th/C1 + "-en Hipolita Bride"/S)/+cp                  "Then Hipolita Bride"

15.                For he sat among <the> suitors grieved in heart

"For he sat among suitors grieved in heart"                  (l/C1 + "-ead by Pirithous"/S)/+cp                  "lead by Pirithous"

16.                     and another holding <a> Garland over her head

"seeing his father in his mind's eye"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "and another holding Garland over her head"/S)/+cp                  "and another holding Garland over her head"

17.               like Hamlet just before <the> latter saw <the> ghost

"like Hamlet just before latter saw ghost"                  (h/C1 + "-er Tresses likewise hanging"/S)/+cp                  "her Tresses likewise hanging"

18.               So careful is <the> poet to prepare both sides

"So careful is poet to prepare both sides"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "After her Emilia holding up her Traine"/S)/+cp                  "After her Emilia holding up her Traine"

19.                      <the> divine epiphany

"divine epiphany"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/C1 + "Artesius and Attendants"/S)/+cp                  "Artesius and Attendants"

20.                   <The> Song, [Musike.] --- and <the> mortal who is to behold it

"and mortal who is to behold it"                  (S/C1 + "-ong Musike"/S)/+cp                  "Song Musike"

21.
Furthermore                  (R/C1 + "-oses their sharpe spines being gon"/S)/+cp                  "Roses their sharpe spines being gon"

22.                  <the> young man saw his father

"young man saw his father"                  (N/C1 + "-ot royall in their smels alone"/S)/+cp                  "Not royall in their smels alone"

23.             scattering <the> suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house

"scattering suitors and himself obtaining honor and ruling his own house"                  (B/C1 + "-ut in their hew"/S)/+cp                  "But in their hew"

24.             This is just what <the> Goddess is going to tell with <a> new sanction

"This is just what Goddess is going to tell with new sanction"                  (M/C1 + "-aiden Pinckes, of odour faint"/S)/+cp                  "Maiden Pinckes, of odour faint"

25.              and it is just what is going to happen in <the> course of <the> poem

"and it is just what is going to happen in course of poem"                (D/C1 + "-azies smel"/S)/+cp               "Dazies smel"

26.
"Truly Telemachus is prepared internally"                  (l/C1 + "-esse, yet most quaint And sweet Time true"/S)/+cp                  "lesse, yet most quaint And sweet Time true"

27.
"he has already everything within him which is to come out of him"                 (Pr/C1 + im/S)/+cp                 Prim

28. Throughout <the> whole interview <the> two main facts are <the> example of <the> parent and <the> final revenge

"Throughout whole interview two main facts are example of parent and final revenge"                  (r/C1 + "-ose first borne child of Ver"/S)/+cp                  "rose first borne child of Ver"

29.            both of which are urged by <the> Goddess without and by <the> man within

"both of which are urged by Goddess without and by man within"                  (M/C1 + "-erry Spring times Herbinger"/S)/+cp                  "Merry Spring times Herbinger"

Et cetera.



William Cowper
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/William+Cowper ,  

"William Cowper"                  (S/S + "-amuel Taylor Coleridge"/P)/Ch                  "Samuel Taylor Coleridge"

*               "William Cowper"  >>  Cowper /GC/S/abT

Born                        26 November 1731                Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England
Died                   25 April 1800 (aged 68)                 East Dereham, Norfolk, England

"1731"                      (W/T + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/+bp                       "William Cowper"
November                     (W/T + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/+cp                    "William Cowper"
"26"                      (W/T + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/Ch/+bp                     "William Cowper"
"Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England"               (W/T + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/Ch/+cp                "William Cowper"

"1800"                     (W/S + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/+bp                       "William Cowper"
Apri                       (W/S + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/+cp                        "William Cowper"
"25"                     (W/S + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/Ch/+bp                      "William Cowper"
"East Dereham, Norfolk, England"                  (W/S + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "William Cowper"

>>               Samuel Taylor Coleridge called him "the best modern poet"

"best modern poet"                (W/C2 + "-illiam Cowper"/P)/Ch                "William Cowper"

>>            whilst William Wordsworth particularly admired his poem Yardley-Oak.

*                "William Wordsworth"  >>  ("Yardley-Oak" /T/Ch)/P

>>                   While Cowper found refuge in a fervent evangelical Christianity,

*                "William Cowper"  >>  ("evangelical Christianity" /C2/Ch)/S

>>            he often experienced doubt and feared that he was doomed to eternal damnation.

*                "William Cowper"  >>  ("eternal damnation" /T/Ch)/S

>>       His religious sentiment and association with John Newton (who wrote the hymn "Amazing Grace")
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Newton ,  
"John Newton"                  (W/GC/S/abT + "-illiam Cowper"/T)/Ch                  "William Cowper"


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c#a1270 ,  
•  The Diverting History of John Gilpin (English) (as Author)
•  The Diverting History of John Gilpin (English) (as Author)
•  The Iliad of Homer
Translated into English Blank Verse by William Cowper (English) (as Translator)
•  The Odyssey of Homer (English) (as Translator)
•  Poemata : Latin, Greek and Italian Poems by John Milton (English) (as Translator)
•  The Task and Other Poems (English) (as Author)

"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"
"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"

"Iliad of Homer"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"
"Translated into English Blank Verse by William Cowper"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/C2)/+cp/Ch                  "William Cowper's 'riting"

"Odyssey of Homer"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"
"Poemata : Latin, Greek and Italian Poems by John Milton"                  (W/P + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"
"Task and Other Poems"                  (W/P + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing"

"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"
"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"
"Iliad of Homer"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"
"Odyssey of Homer"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"
"Poemata : Latin, Greek and Italian Poems by John Milton"                  (M/P + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"
"Task and Other Poems"                  (M/P + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   William Cowper's  "The Diverting History of John Gilpin"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Much Ado About Nothing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/11979/11979-h/11979-h.htm ,    
The Diverting History of John Gilpin

Showing how he went farther than he intended, and came safe home again.

John Gilpin was a citizen

Of credit and renown,

A train-band captain eke was he, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/full.html ,  
Much Ado About Nothing

ACT I
SCENE I. Before LEONATO'S house.

Enter LEONATO, HERO, and BEATRICE, with a Messenger

LEONATO

I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon
comes this night to Messina.

Messenger

He is very near by this: he was not three leagues off
when I left him.

LEONATO

How many gentlemen have you lost in this action?

Messenger

But few of any sort, and none of name.

LEONATO

A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings
home full numbers. I find here that Don Peter hath
bestowed much honour on a young Florentine called Claudio.

Messenger

Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by
Don Pedro: he hath borne himself beyond the
promise of his age, doing, ~ ~


"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"

"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"


1.
"Showing how he went farther than he intended"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"and came safe home again"                 (B/T + "-efore LEONATO'S house"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Before LEONATO'S house"

3.
John                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter LEONATO"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Enter LEONATO"

4.
Gilpin                                (H/T + ERO/P)/+bp/Ch                                  HERO

5.
was                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and BEATRICE"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "and BEATRICE"

6. with <a> Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina --- John Gilpin was <a> citizen Of credit and renown

citizen                 (w/T + "-ith Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "with Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"

7.
Of                 (M/T + "-essenger He is very near by this"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger He is very near by this"

8.
credit                 (h/T + "-e was not three leagues off when I left him"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "he was not three leagues off when I left him"

9.
and                 (L/T + "-EONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"

10.
renown                 (M/T + "-essenger But few of any sort"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger But few of any sort"

11.
train                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and none of name"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "and none of name"

12. LEONATO <A> victory is twice itself when <the> achiever brings home full numbers --- <A> train-band captain eke was he

band                 (L/T + "-EONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"

13.   I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on <a> young Florentine called Claudio

captain                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"

14.
eke                 (M/T + "-essenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"

15.                he hath borne himself beyond <the> promise of his age

was                 (h/T + "-e hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"/P)/+bp/Ch                  "he hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"

16.
he                                   (d/T + oing/P)/+bp/Ch                                   doing

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   William Cowper's  "The Diverting History of John Gilpin"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Much Ado About Nothing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23753/23753-h/23753-h.htm ,  
The Diverting History of John Gilpin

John Gilpin was a citizen

Of credit and renown,

A train-band captain eke was he,

Of famous ~ ~


"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/full.html ,  
"Diverting History of John Gilpin"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"


1.
John                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
Gilpin                 (B/T + "-efore LEONATO'S house"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Before LEONATO'S house"

3.
was                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter LEONATO"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Enter LEONATO"

4.
citizen                                (H/T + ERO/S)/+bp/Ch                                  HERO

5.
Of                   ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and BEATRICE"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "and BEATRICE"

6. with <a> Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina --- John Gilpin was <a> citizen Of credit and renown

credit                 (w/T + "-ith Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "with Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"

7.
and                 (M/T + "-essenger He is very near by this"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger He is very near by this"

8.
renown                 (h/T + "-e was not three leagues off when I left him"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "he was not three leagues off when I left him"

9.
train                 (L/T + "-EONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"

10.
band                 (M/T + "-essenger But few of any sort"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger But few of any sort"

11.
captain                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and none of name"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "and none of name"

12. LEONATO <A> victory is twice itself when <the> achiever brings home full numbers --- <A> train-band captain eke was he

eke                 (L/T + "-EONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"

13.   I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on <a> young Florentine called Claudio

was                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"

14.
he                 (M/T + "-essenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"

15.                he hath borne himself beyond <the> promise of his age

Of                 (h/T + "-e hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"/S)/+bp/Ch                  "he hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"

16.
famous                                (d/T + oing/S)/+bp/Ch                                 doing

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   William Cowper's  "The Iliad of Homer"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Much Ado About Nothing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16452/16452-h/16452-h.htm ,  
•  The Iliad of Homer
Translated into English Blank Verse by William Cowper

PREFACE.

Whether a translation of Homer may be best executed in blank verse or in rhyme, is a question in the decision of which no man can find difficulty, who has ever duly considered what translation ought to be, or who is in any degree practically acquainted with those very different kinds of versification. I will venture to assert that a just translation of any ancient poet in rhyme, is impossible. No human ingenuity can be equal to the task of closing every couplet with sounds homotonous, expressing at the same time the full sense, and only the full sense of his original. The translator's ingenuity, indeed, in this case becomes itself a snare, and the readier he is at invention and expedient, the more likely he is to be betrayed into the widest departures from the guide whom he professes to follow. ~ ~


"Iliad of Homer"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"
"Translated into English Blank Verse by William Cowper"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/C2)/+cp/Ch                  "William Cowper's 'riting"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/full.html ,  
"Iliad of Homer"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"


1.
PREFACE                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/C2)/+bp/Ch                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.          Whether <a> translation of Homer may be best executed in blank verse or in rhyme

"Whether translation of Homer may be best executed in blank verse or in rhyme"                 (B/T + "-efore LEONATO'S house"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Before LEONATO'S house"

3.                is <a> question in <the> decision of which no man can find difficulty

"is question in decision of which no man can find difficulty"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter LEONATO"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Enter LEONATO"

4.
"who has ever duly considered what translation ought to be"                  (H/T + ERO/C2)/+bp/Ch                  HERO

5.
"or who is in any degree practically acquainted with those very different kinds of versification"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and BEATRICE"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "and BEATRICE"

6. with <a> Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina --- I will venture to assert that <a> just translation of any ancient poet in rhyme

"I will venture to assert that just translation of any ancient poet in rhyme"                 (w/T + "-ith Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "with Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"

7.
"is impossible"                 (M/T + "-essenger He is very near by this"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger He is very near by this"

8.      No human ingenuity can be equal to <the> task of closing every couplet with sounds homotonous

"No human ingenuity can be equal to task of closing every couplet with sounds homotonous"                 (h/T + "-e was not three leagues off when I left him"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "he was not three leagues off when I left him"

9.                  expressing at <the> same time <the> full sense

"expressing at same time full sense"                 (L/T + "-EONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"

10.                         and only <the> full sense of his original

"and only full sense of his original"                 (M/T + "-essenger But few of any sort"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger But few of any sort"

11.                      <The> translator's ingenuity

"translator's ingenuity"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and none of name"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "and none of name"

12.          LEONATO <A> victory is twice itself when <the> achiever brings home full numbers

indeed                 (L/T + "-EONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"

13.   I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on <a> young Florentine called Claudio --- in this case becomes itself <a> snare

"in this case becomes itself snare"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"

14.
he                 (M/T + "-essenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"

15. he hath borne himself beyond <the> promise of his age --- and <the> readier he is at invention and expedient

"and readier he is at invention and expedient"                 (h/T + "-e hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"/C2)/+bp/Ch                  "he hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"

16. <the> more likely he is to be betrayed into <the> widest departures from <the> guide whom he professes to follow

"more likely he is to be betrayed into widest departures from guide whom he professes to follow"               (d/T + oing/C2)/+bp/Ch               doing

Et cetera.



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   William Cowper's  "The Odyssey of Homer"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Much Ado About Nothing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/24269/24269-h/24269-h.htm ,  
The Odyssey of Homer

TRANSLATED INTO
ENGLISH BLANK VERSE

BOOK I

ARGUMENT

In a council of the Gods, Minerva calls their attention to Ulysses, still a wanderer. They resolve to grant him a safe return to Ithaca. Minerva descends to encourage Telemachus, and in the form of Mentes directs him in what manner to proceed. Throughout this book the extravagance and profligacy of the suitors are occasionally suggested.
Muse make the man thy theme, for shrewdness famed And genius versatile, who far and wide A Wand’rer, after Ilium overthrown, Discover’d various cities, and the mind And manners learn’d of men, in lands remote. He num’rous woes on Ocean toss’d, endured, ~ ~


"Odyssey of Homer"                  (W/T + "-illiam Cowper's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "William Cowper's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/much_ado/full.html ,  
"Odyssey of Homer"                  (M/T + "-uch Ado About Nothing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Much Ado About Nothing"


1.     TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH BLANK VERSE BOOK i ARGUMENT In <a> council of <the> Gods

"TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH BLANK VERSE BOOK i ARGUMENT In council of Gods"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"Minerva calls their attention to Ulysses"                 (B/T + "-efore LEONATO'S house"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Before LEONATO'S house"

3.                    still <a> wanderer

"still wanderer"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter LEONATO"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Enter LEONATO"

4.                  They resolve to grant him <a> safe return to Ithaca

"They resolve to grant him safe return to Ithaca"                  (H/T + ERO/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  HERO

5.
"Minerva descends to encourage Telemachus"                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and BEATRICE"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "and BEATRICE"

6. with <a> Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina --- and in <the> form of Mentes directs him in what manner to proceed

"and in form of Mentes directs him in what manner to proceed"                 (w/T + "-ith Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "with Messenger LEONATO I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon comes this night to Messina"

7.          Throughout this book <the> extravagance and profligacy of <the> suitors are occasionally suggested

"Throughout this book extravagance and profligacy of suitors are occasionally suggested"                 (M/T + "-essenger He is very near by this"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger He is very near by this"

8.                Muse make <the> man thy theme

"Muse make man thy theme"                 (h/T + "-e was not three leagues off when I left him"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "he was not three leagues off when I left him"

9.
"for shrewdness famed And genius versatile"                 (L/T + "-EONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO How many gentlemen have you lost in this action"

10.            who far and wide <A> Wand’rer

"who far and wide Wand’rer"                 (M/T + "-essenger But few of any sort"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger But few of any sort"

11.
"after Ilium overthrown"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and none of name"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "and none of name"

12.          LEONATO <A> victory is twice itself when <the> achiever brings home full numbers

"Discover’d various cities"                 (L/T + "-EONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "LEONATO victory is twice itself when achiever brings home full numbers"

13.   I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on <a> young Florentine called Claudio --- and <the> mind And manners learn’d of men

"and mind And manners learn’d of men"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on young Florentine called Claudio"

14.
"in lands remote"                 (M/T + "-essenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "Messenger Much deserved on his part and equally remembered by Don Pedro"

15.                   he hath borne himself beyond <the> promise of his age

"He num’rous woes on Ocean toss’d"                 (h/T + "-e hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                  "he hath borne himself beyond promise of his age"

16.
endured                              (d/T + oing/GC/S/abT)/+bp/Ch                          doing

Et cetera.



John Fletcher (playwright)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Fletcher+(playwright) ,  

"John Fletcher"                    (J/P + "-onathan Swift"/T)/Ch                   "Jonathan Swift"


>>              King's Men
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/King's+Men+(playing+company) ,  
"King's Men"                            ([ŋ=  w=]/S + actors/C1)                            actors

*             "King's Men"  >>  ("Lord Chamberlain's Men" /T/Ch)/C1

>> The royal patent of May 19, 1603 that charters the King's Men names the following players, in this order: Lawrence Fletcher, William Shakespeare, Richard Burbage, Augustine Phillips, John Heminges, Henry Condell, William Sly, Robert Armin, Richard Cowley, "and the rest of their associates...." The nine cited by name became Grooms of the Chamber. On March 15, 1604, each of the nine men named in the patent was supplied with four and a half yards of red cloth for the coronation procession.

"Lawrence Fletcher"                   (K/T + "-ing's Men"/GC/S/abT)                  "King's Men"
"William Shakespeare"                     (K/P + "-ing's Men"/C2)                     "King's Men"
"Richard Burbage"                          (K/T + "-ing's Men"/S)                     "King's Men"
"Augustine Phillips"                        (K/S + "-ing's Men"/C2)                     "King's Men"
"John Heminges"                         (K/S + "-ing's Men"/T)                        "King's Men"
"Henry Condell"                     (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing's Men"/P)                     "King's Men"
"William Sly"                       (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing's Men"/S)                     "King's Men"
"Robert Armin"                     (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing's Men"/T)                     "King's Men"
"Richard Cowley"                    (K/GC/S/abT + "-ing's Men"/C2)                   "King's Men"

"1603"                           (K/T + "-ing's Men"/C1)/+bp                          "King's Men"
May                              (K/T + "-ing's Men"/C1)/+cp                          "King's Men"
"19"                          (K/T + "-ing's Men"/C1)/Ch/+bp                         "King's Men"
charters                         (K/T + "-ing's Men"/C1)/Ch/+cp                       "King's Men"

"1604"                           (K/P + "-ing's Men"/C1)/+bp                          "King's Men"
March                            (K/P + "-ing's Men"/C1)/+cp                          "King's Men"
"15"                          (K/P + "-ing's Men"/C1)/Ch/+bp                         "King's Men"
"four and half yards of red cloth"                  (k/P + "-ing's Men"/C1)/Ch/+cp                  "King's Men"


>>              working with Nathan Field and later with Philip Massinger
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Nathan+Field ,  
"Nathan Field"                   (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)                   "John Fletcher"
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Philip+Massinger ,  
"Philip Massinger"                   (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                   "John Fletcher"

>>                     Aston Cockayne
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Aston+Cockayne ,  
"Aston Cockayne"                   (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)                   "John Fletcher"

>>                  Giovanni Battista Guarini

"Giovanni Battista Guarini"                   (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                   "John Fletcher"

>>                 By 1784, Thomas Davies asserted
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Thomas+Davies+(bookseller) ,  
"Thomas Davies"                   (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)                   "John Fletcher"

>>                  Alexander Dyce

"Alexander Dyce"                   (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                   "John Fletcher"

>>                  Cyrus Hoy
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Cyrus+Hoy ,    
"Cyrus Hoy"                    (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher"/GC/S/abT)                    "John Fletcher"


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/f#a4606 ,      
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (1 of 10) - the Custom of the Country (English) (as Author)
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (2 of 10) - the Humourous Lieutenant (English) (as Author)
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (8 of 10)
The Womans Prize; The Island Princess; The Noble Gentleman;
The Coronation; The Coxcomb (English) (as Author)
•  Beggars Bush
From the Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Volume 2 of 10) (English) (as Author)

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"one of ten"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Custom of Country"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"two of ten"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Humourous Lieutenant"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"eight of ten"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Womans Prize; Island Princess; Noble Gentleman"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Coronation; Coxcomb"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Beggars Bush"                 (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"From Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Volume 2/two of 10/ten"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beggars Bush"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Faithful Shepherdess
The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Volume 2 of 10). (English) (as Author)
•  The False One (English) (as Author)
•  A King, and No King (English) (as Author)
•  The Laws of Candy
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)

"Faithful Shepherdess"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Volume 2 of 10"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"False One"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"King, and No King"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/C2)                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Laws of Candy"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"three of ten"                 (J/T + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Faithful Shepherdess"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"False One"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"King, and No King"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Laws of Candy"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Little French Lawyer
A Comedy (English) (as Author)
•  The Mad Lover
The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)
•  The Maids Tragedy (English) (as Author)
•  Philaster
Love Lies a Bleeding (English) (as Author)

"Little French Lawyer"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
Comedy                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Mad Lover"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"three of ten"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Maids Tragedy"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"C2)                 "John Fletcher's writing"

Philaster                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Love Lies Bleeding"                 (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Little French Lawyer"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Mad Lover"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Maids Tragedy"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
Philaster                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  Rule a Wife, and Have a Wife
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)
•  The Scornful Lady (English) (as Author)
•  The Spanish Curate
A Comedy (English) (as Author)
•  The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes
Volume I. (English) (as Author)

"Rule Wife, and Have Wife"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"three of ten"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Scornful Lady"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Spanish Curate"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/C2)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
Comedy                (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/C2)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Volume i"                 (J/S + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch,                 "John Fletcher's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Rule Wife, and Have Wife"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Scornful Lady"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Spanish Curate"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher
Volume 2 of 10: Introduction to the Elder Brother (English) (as Author)

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Volume 2 of 10"                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Introduction to Elder Brother"                 (J/GC/S/abT + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "John Fletcher's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (M/GC/S/abT + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"



>> Phonetic correspondence   between   John Fletcher's  "Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (1 of 10) - the Custom of the Country"    and   William Shakespeare's  "Much Ado About Nothing"

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/12039/pg12039.html ,  
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (1 of 10) - the Custom of the Country

Actus primus. Scena prima.

Enter Rutilio, and Arnold[o].

Rut. Why do you grieve thus still?

Arn. 'Twould melt a Marble, And tame a Savage man, to feel my fortune.

Rut. What fortune? I have liv'd this thirty years,
And run through all these follies you call fortunes,
Yet never fixt on any good and constant,
But what I made myself: why should I grieve then
At that I may mould any way? ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
Midsummer Night's Dream

ACT I
SCENE I. Athens. The palace of THESEUS.

Enter THESEUS, HIPPOLYTA, PHILOSTRATE, and Attendants
THESEUS
Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour
Draws on apace; four happy days bring in
Another moon: but, O, methinks, how slow
This old moon wanes! she lingers my desires,
Like to a step-dame or a dowager
Long withering out a young man revenue. ~ ~


"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (J/C2 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"one of ten"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)                 "John Fletcher's writing"
"Custom of Country"                 (J/C1 + "-ohn Fletcher's writing"/P)/Ch                 "John Fletcher's writing"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"


1
"Actus primus"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i SCENE i"/P)                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"Scena prima"                          ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + Athens/P)                           Athens

3.               <The> palace of THESEUS

"Enter Rutilio"                 (p/C2 + "-alace of THESEUS"/P)                 "palace of THESEUS"

4.
"and Arnold"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enter THESEUS"/P)                 "Enter THESEUS"

5.
o                                   (HIP/C2 + POLYTA/P)                                 HIPPOLYTA

6.
"R u t. Why do you grieve thus still"                 (PH/C2 + ILOSTRATE/P)                 PHILOSTRATE

7.                Arn. 'Twould melt <a> Marble

"A r n. 'Twould melt Marble"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and Attendants THESEUS Now"/P)                 "and Attendants THESEUS Now"

8.              And tame <a> Savage man

"And tame Savage man"                 (f/C2 + "-air Hippolyta"/P)                 "fair Hippolyta"

9.
"to feel my fortune"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "our nuptial hour Draws on apace"/P)                 "our nuptial hour Draws on apace"

10.
"R u t. What fortune"                 (f/C2 + "-our happy days bring in Another moon"/P)                 "four happy days bring in Another moon"

11.
"I have liv'd this thirty years"                 (b/C2 + "-ut, O, methinks"/P)                 "but, O, methinks"

12.
"And run through all these follies you call fortunes"                 (h/C2 + "-ow slow This old moon wanes"/P)                 "how slow This old moon wanes"

13.
"Yet never fixt on any good and constant"                 (sh/C2 + "-e lingers my desires"/P)                 "she lingers my desires"

14.                Like to <a> step

"But what I made myself"                   (L/C2 + "-ike to step"/P)                  "Like to step"

15.              dame or <a> dowager Long withering out <a> young man revenue

"why should I grieve then At that I may mould any way"                 (d/C2 + "-ame or dowager Long withering out young man revenue"/P)                 "dame or dowager Long withering out young man revenue"

Et cetera.



Francis Beaumont
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Francis+Beaumont ,  

"Francis Beaumont"                   (J/P + "-ohn Fletcher"/C2)/Ch                  "John Fletcher"

*            "Francis Beaumont"  >>  Beaumont /P

Born                          1584              Grace-Dieu, Thringstone, Leicestershire, England
Died                   6 March 1616                              London

"1584"                       (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/P)                      "Francis Beaumont"
"Grace-Dieu, Thringstone, Leicestershire, England"               (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/P)/Ch                "Francis Beaumont"

"1616"                    (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/S)/+bp                    "Francis Beaumont"
March                     (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/S)/+cp                    "Francis Beaumont"
"6"                    (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/S)/Ch/+bp                    "Francis Beaumont"
London                  (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont"/S)/Ch/+cp                  "Francis Beaumont"


>>           Aston Cockayne
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Aston+Cockayne ,  
*            "Francis Beaumont"  >>  ("Michael Drayton" /P)/C1  >>  ("Aston Cockayne" /P/Ch)/C1


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a3603 ,  
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (1 of 10) - the Custom of the Country (English) (as Author)
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (2 of 10) - the Humourous Lieutenant (English) (as Author)
•  Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (8 of 10)
The Womans Prize; The Island Princess; The Noble Gentleman;
The Coronation; The Coxcomb (English) (as Author)
•  Beggars Bush
From the Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Volume 2 of 10) (English) (as Author)

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (Fr/C2 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"one of ten"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Custom of Country"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (Fr/C2 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"two of ten"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Humourous Lieutenant"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (Fr/C2 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"eight of ten"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Womans Prize; Island Princess; Noble Gentleman"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Coronation; Coxcomb"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Beggars Bush"                 (Fr/C2 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"From Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Volume 2/two of 10/ten"                 (Fr/C1 + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Beggars Bush"                 (M/C2 + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Faithful Shepherdess
The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Volume 2 of 10). (English) (as Author)
•  The False One (English) (as Author)
•  A King, and No King (English) (as Author)
•  The Laws of Candy
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)

"Faithful Shepherdess"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Volume 2 of 10"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"False One"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"King, and No King"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/C2)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Laws of Candy"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"three of ten"                 (Fr/T + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Faithful Shepherdess"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"False One"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"King, and No King"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Laws of Candy"                 (M/T + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Little French Lawyer
A Comedy (English) (as Author)
•  The Mad Lover
The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)
•  The Maids Tragedy (English) (as Author)
•  Philaster
Love Lies a Bleeding (English) (as Author)

"Little French Lawyer"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
Comedy                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Mad Lover"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"three of ten"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Maids Tragedy"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"C2)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

Philaster                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Love Lies Bleeding"                 (Fr/P + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Little French Lawyer"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Mad Lover"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Maids Tragedy"                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
Philaster                 (M/P + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  Rule a Wife, and Have a Wife
Beaumont & Fletcher's Works (3 of 10) (English) (as Author)
•  The Scornful Lady (English) (as Author)
•  The Spanish Curate
A Comedy (English) (as Author)
•  The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes
Volume I. (English) (as Author)

"Rule Wife, and Have Wife"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Beaumont N Fletcher's Works"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"three of ten"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Scornful Lady"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/P)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Spanish Curate"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/C2)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
Comedy                (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/C2)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Volume i"                 (Fr/S + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/GC/S/abT)/Ch,                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Rule Wife, and Have Wife"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/T)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Scornful Lady"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/P)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Spanish Curate"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher in Ten Volumes"                 (M/S + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/GC/S/abT)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher
Volume 2 of 10: Introduction to the Elder Brother (English) (as Author)

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Volume 2 of 10"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Introduction to Elder Brother"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (M/GC/S/abT + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/S)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"

•  Wit Without Money
The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (English) (as Author)

"Wit Without Money"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/C2)                 "Francis Beaumont's work"
"Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher"                 (Fr/GC/S/abT + "-ancis Beaumont's work"/C2)/Ch                 "Francis Beaumont's work"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream"

"Wit Without Money"                 (M/GC/S/abT + "-idsummer Night's Dream"/C2)                 "Midsummer Night's Dream"



Walter Scott
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Walter+Scott ,  

*                 "John Dryden"  >>  ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1

>>          Sir Walter Scott,          Scott

*   ("Walter Scott" /P)/C1  >>  Scott /GC/S/abT  >>  "Sir Walter Scott" /GC/S/abT/Ch

Born                             15 August 1771                        Edinburgh, Scotland
Died                     21 September 1832 (aged 61)                   Melrose, Scotland

"1771"                        (W/T + "-alter Scott"/C2)/+bp                         "Walter Scott"
August                        (W/T + "-alter Scott"/C2)/+cp                         "Walter Scott"
"15"                        (W/T + "-alter Scott"/C2)/Ch/+bp                        "Walter Scott"
"Edinburgh, Scotland"                  (W/T + "-alter Scott"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott"

"1832"                        (W/P + "-alter Scott"/C2)/+bp                         "Walter Scott"
September                     (W/P + "-alter Scott"/C2)/+cp                         "Walter Scott"
"21"                        (W/P + "-alter Scott"/C2)/Ch/+bp                        "Walter Scott"
"Melrose, Scotland"                 (W/P + "-alter Scott"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott"

>>                  learned from him the history of the Kirk
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Church+of+Scotland ,  
*                  "Church of Scotland"  >>  (Kirk /P)/T

>>                   James Ballantyne
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/James+Ballantyne ,  
*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P

>>              Scott met the blind poet Thomas Blacklock
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Thomas+Blacklock ,  
*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Blacklock" /T/Ch)/P

>>            John Langhorne (poet)
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/John+Langhorne+(poet) ,  
*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Blacklock" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("James Macpherson" /T)/S  >>  ("John Langhorne" /T/Ch)/S

>>    Scott's portrait was painted by Sir Edwin Landseer and fellow-Scots Sir Henry Raeburn and James Eckford Lauder.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Henry+Raeburn ,  
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/James+Eckford+Lauder ,    
*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Blacklock" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("James Macpherson" /T)/S  >>  ("John Langhorne" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Robert Burns" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Mark Twain" /C1/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Jane Austen" /C1)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Mark Twain" /C1/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Henry Raeburn" /C2)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("James Eckford Lauder" /C2/Ch)/GC/S/abT


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a59 ,  
•  The Abbot (English) (as Author)
•  The Antiquary — Complete (English) (as Author)
•  The Antiquary — Volume 01 (English) (as Author)
•  The Antiquary — Volume 02 (English) (as Author)

Abbot                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Antiquary                   (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Antiquary                   (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Antiquary                   (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Abbot                                 (Cymb/T + eline/P)/+bp                           Cymbeline
Antiquary                             (Cymb/T + eline/P)/+cp                            Cymbeline
Antiquary                           (Cymb/T + eline/P)/Ch/+bp                          Cymbeline
Antiquary                           (Cymb/T + eline/P)/Ch/+cp                          Cymbeline

•  The Betrothed (English) (as Author)
•  The Black Dwarf (English) (as Author)
•  The Bride of Lammermoor (English) (as Author)
•  Chronicles of the Canongate (English) (as Author)

Betrothed                    (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Black Dwarf"                    (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Bride of Lammermoor"                    (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Chronicles of Canongate"                    (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Betrothed                              (Cym/P + beline/T)/+bp                          Cymbeline
"Black Dwarf"                          (Cym/P + beline/T)/+cp                          Cymbeline
"Bride of Lammermoor"                    (Cym/P + beline/T)/Ch/+bp                  Cymbeline
"Chronicles of Canongate"                    (Cym/P + beline/T)/Ch/+cp                  Cymbeline

•  The Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Volume 1
With a Life of the Author (English) (as Author)
•  The Fair Maid of Perth
Or, St. Valentine's Day (English) (as Author)
•  The Fortunes of Nigel (English) (as Author)
•  Guy Mannering (English) (as Author)

"Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Volume i"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Fair Maid of Perth"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Fortunes of Nigel"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Guy Mannering"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Volume i"                    (Cymb/T + eline/S)/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Fair Maid of Perth"                         (Cymb/T + eline/S)/+cp                      Cymbeline
"Fortunes of Nigel"                       (Cymb/T + eline/S)/Ch/+bp                    Cymbeline
"Guy Mannering"                         (Cymb/T + eline/S)/Ch/+cp                    Cymbeline

•  Guy Mannering — Complete (English) (as Author)
•  Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Complete (English) (as Author)
•  Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Volume 01 (English) (as Author)
•  Guy Mannering, Or, the Astrologer — Volume 02 (English) (as Author)

"Guy Mannering"                    (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Guy Mannering"                          (Cym/S + beline/T)/+bp                       Cymbeline
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (Cym/S + beline/T)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (Cym/S + beline/T)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Guy Mannering, Or, Astrologer"                    (Cym/S + beline/T)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete (English) (as Author)
•  The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume 1 (English) (as Author)
•  The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume 2 (English) (as Author)
•  Ivanhoe (Dutch) (as Author)

"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume i"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume i i"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Ivanhoe                   (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete"                    (Cymb/T + eline/C2)/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume i"                    (Cymb/T + eline/C2)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Heart of Mid-Lothian, Volume i i"                    (Cymb/T + eline/C2)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
Ivanhoe                           (Cymb/T + eline/C2)/Ch/+cp                         Cymbeline

•  Ivanhoe (English) (as Author)
•  Ivanhoe (1/4)
Le retour du croisé (French) (as Author)
•  Ivanhoe (2/4)
Le retour du croisé (French) (as Author)
•  Ivanhoe (3/4)
Le retour du croisé (French) (as Author)

Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                             (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/+bp                            Cymbeline
Ivanhoe                             (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/+cp                            Cymbeline
Ivanhoe                          (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/Ch/+bp                           Cymbeline
Ivanhoe                          (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/Ch/+cp                           Cymbeline

•  Ivanhoe (4/4)
Le retour du croisé (French) (as Author)
•  The Journal of Sir Walter Scott
From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford (English) (as Author)
•  Kenilworth (English) (as Author)
•  The Lady of the Lake (English) (as Author)

Ivanhoe                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Journal of Sir Walter Scott"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Kenilworth                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Lady of Lake"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                          (Cymb/T + eline/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       Cymbeline
"Journal of Sir Walter Scott"                    (Cymb/T + eline/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 Cymbeline
Kenilworth                       (Cymb/T + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                    Cymbeline
"Lady of Lake"                     (Cymb/T + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                  Cymbeline

•  The Lady of the Lake (English) (as Author)
•  A Legend of Montrose (English) (as Author)
•  Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft (English) (as Author)
•  Marmion (English) (as Author)

"Lady of Lake"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Legend of Montrose"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Marmion                  (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Lady of Lake"                       (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/T)/+bp                    Cymbeline
"Legend of Montrose"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/T)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/T)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
Marmion                       (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/T)/Ch/+cp                      Cymbeline

•  Marmion (English) (as Author)
•  Minstrelsy of the Scottish border, Volume 1 (English) (as Author)
•  Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Volume 2
Consisting of Historical and Romantic Ballads, Collected in The
Southern Counties of Scotland; with a Few of Modern Date, Founded
Upon Local Tradition (English) (as Author)
•  The Monastery (English) (as Author)

Marmion                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Minstrelsy of Scottish border, Volume i"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Minstrelsy of Scottish border, Volume i i"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Monastery                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Marmion                             (Cymb/P + eline/S)/+bp                            Cymbeline
"Minstrelsy of Scottish border, Volume i"                   (Cymb/P + eline /S)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Minstrelsy of Scottish border, Volume i i"                   (Cymb/P + eline/S)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
Monastery                          (Cymb/P + eline/S)/Ch/+cp                         Cymbeline

•  My Aunt Margaret's Mirror (English) (as Author)
•  Le nain noir (French) (as Author)
•  Old Mortality, Complete (English) (as Author)
•  Old Mortality, Volume 1. (English) (as Author)

"My Aunt Margaret's Mirror"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"nain noir"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Old Mortality, Complete"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Old Mortality, Volume i"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"My Aunt Margaret's Mirror"                   (Cym/S + beline/P)/+bp                 "Cymbeline
"nain noir"                             (Cym/S + beline/P)/+cp                          Cymbeline
"Old Mortality, Complete"                   (Cym/S + beline/P)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Old Mortality, Volume i"                   (Cym/S + beline/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Cymbeline

•  Old Mortality, Volume 2. (English) (as Author)
•  Perth'in kaupungin kaunotar (Finnish) (as Author)
•  Peveril of the Peak (English) (as Author)
•  Quentin Durward (English) (as Author)

"Old Mortality, Volume i i"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Perth'in kaupungin kaunotar"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Peveril of Peak"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Quentin Durward"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Old Mortality, Volume i i"                     (Cymb/P + eline/C2)/+bp                  Cymbeline
"Perth'in kaupungin kaunotar"                   (Cymb/P + eline/C2)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Peveril of Peak"                         (Cymb/P + eline/C2)/Ch/+bp                   Cymbeline
"Quentin Durward"                      (Cymb/P + eline/C2)/Ch/+cp                    Cymbeline

•  Quentin Durward (French) (as Author)
•  Qventin Durward (Finnish) (as Author)
•  Red Cap Tales
Stolen from the Treasure Chest of the Wizard of the North (English) (as Author)
•  Redgauntlet (English) (as Author)

'Quentin Durward"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
'Quentin Durward"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Red Cap Tales"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Redgauntlet                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

'Quentin Durward"                         (Cym/C2 + beline/P)/+bp                     Cymbeline
'Quentin Durward"                        (Cym/C2 + beline/P)/+cp                      Cymbeline
"Red Cap Tales"                        (Cym/C2 + beline/P)/Ch/+bp                     Cymbeline
Redgauntlet                          (Cym/C2 + beline/P)/Ch/+cp                       Cymbeline

•  Rob-Roy (French) (as Author)
•  Rob Roy — Complete (English) (as Author)
•  Rob Roy — Volume 01 (English) (as Author)
•  Rob Roy — Volume 02 (English) (as Author)

"Rob-Roy"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Rob Roy — Complete"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Rob Roy — Volume 0 i"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Rob Roy — Volume 0 i i"                   (W/P + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Rob-Roy"                        (Cymb/P + eline/GC/S/abT)/+bp                      Cymbeline
"Rob Roy — Complete"                   (Cymb/P + eline/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Rob Roy — Volume 0 i"                   (Cymb/P + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Rob Roy — Volume 0 i i"                   (Cymb/P + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  Some Poems (English) (as Author)
•  Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners) (English) (as Contributor)
•  St. Ronan's Well (English) (as Author)
•  The Surgeon's Daughter (English) (as Author)

"Some Poems"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners)"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"S t. Ronan's Well"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Surgeon's Daughter"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/P)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Some Poems"                      (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/P)/+bp                    Cymbeline
"Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners)"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/P)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"S t. Ronan's Well"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/P)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Surgeon's Daughter"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/P)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  The Talisman (English) (as Author)
•  Talismani (Finnish) (as Author)
•  The Tapestried Chamber, and Death of the Laird's Jock (English) (as Author)
•  Trial of Duncan Terig, alias Clerk, and Alexander Bane Macdonald
for the Murder of Arthur Davis, Sergeant in General Guise's
Regiment of Foot (English) (as Author)


Talisman                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Talismani                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Tapestried Chamber, and Death of Laird's Jock"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Trial of Duncan Terig, alias Clerk, and Alexander Bane Macdonald"                   (W/S + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Talisman                              (Cym/S + beline/C2)/+bp                          Cymbeline
Talismani                              (Cym/S + beline/C2)/+cp                          Cymbeline
"Tapestried Chamber, and Death of Laird's Jock"                   (Cym/S + beline/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Trial of Duncan Terig, alias Clerk, and Alexander Bane Macdonald"                   (Cym/S + beline/C2)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  Vanha tarina Montrosesta (Finnish) (as Author)
•  Waverley (English) (as Author)
•  Waverley — Complete (English) (as Author)
•  Waverley Novels — Volume 12 (English) (as Author)

"Vanha tarina Montrosesta"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
Waverley                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Waverley — Complete"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Waverley Novels — Volume x i i"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/S)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Vanha tarina Montrosesta"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/S)/+bp                 Cymbeline
Waverley                              (Cymb/C2 + eline/S)/+cp                         Cymbeline
"Waverley — Complete"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/S)/Ch/+bp                  Cymbeline
"Waverley Novels — Volume x i i"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/S)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since (English) (as Author)
•  Waverley — Volume 1 (English) (as Author)
•  Waverley — Volume 2 (English) (as Author)
•  Woodstock; or, the Cavalier (English) (as Author)

"Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Waverley — Volume i"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Waverley — Volume i i"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"Woodstock; or, Cavalier"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Waverley — Volume i"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/GC/S/abT)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"Waverley — Volume i i"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"Woodstock; or, Cavalier"                   (Cymb/C2 + eline/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 02 (English) (as Editor)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 04 (English) (as Commentator)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 05 (English) (as Editor)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 06 (English) (as Editor)

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 i i"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 i v"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v i"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 i i"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C2)/+bp                 Cymbeline
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 i v"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C2)/+cp                 Cymbeline
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C2)/Ch/+bp                 Cymbeline
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v i"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C2)/Ch/+cp                 Cymbeline

•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 07 (English) (as Editor)
•  The works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 16 (English) (as Editor)

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v i i"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C1)                 "Walter Scott's writing"
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume x v i"                   (W/GC/S/abT + "-alter Scott's writing"/C1)/Ch                 "Walter Scott's writing"

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume 0 v i i"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C1)                 Cymbeline
"works of John Dryden, now first collected in eighteen volumes. Volume x v i"                   (Cym/GC/S/abT + beline/C1)/Ch                 Cymbeline



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (English)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/82/82-h/82-h.htm ,    
Ivanhoe

CHAPTER I

     Thus communed these; while to their lowly dome,
     The full-fed swine return'd with evening home;
     Compell'd, reluctant, to the several sties,
     With din obstreperous, and ungrateful cries.
     Pope's Odyssey

In that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by the river Don, there extended in ancient times a large forest, covering the greater part of the beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and the pleasant town of Doncaster. The remains of this extensive wood are still to be seen at the noble seats of Wentworth, of Warncliffe Park, and around Rotherham. Here haunted of yore the fabulous Dragon of Wantley; here were fought many of the most desperate battles during the Civil Wars of the Roses; and here also flourished in ancient times those bands of gallant outlaws, whose deeds have been rendered so popular in English song.

Such being our chief scene, the date of our story refers to a period towards the end of the reign of Richard I., when his return from his long captivity had become an event rather wished than hoped for by his despairing subjects, who were in the meantime subjected to every species of subordinate oppression. The nobles, whose power had become exorbitant during the reign of Stephen, and whom the prudence of Henry the Second had scarce reduced to some degree of subjection to the crown, had now resumed their ancient license in its utmost extent; despising the feeble interference of the English Council of State, fortifying their castles, increasing the number of their dependants, reducing all around them to a state of vassalage, and striving by every means in their power, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
Cymbeline


ACT I
SCENE I. Britain. The garden of Cymbeline's palace.

Enter two Gentlemen
First Gentleman
You do not meet a man but frowns: our bloods
No more obey the heavens than our courtiers
Still seem as does the king.

Second Gentleman
But what's the matter?

First Gentleman
His daughter, and the heir of's kingdom, whom
He purposed to his wife's sole son--a widow
That late he married--hath referr'd herself
Unto a poor but worthy gentleman: she's wedded;
Her husband banish'd; she imprison'd: all
Is outward sorrow; though I think the king
Be touch'd at very heart.

Second Gentleman
None but the king?

First Gentleman
He that hath lost her too; so is the queen,
That most desired the match; but not a courtier,
Although they wear their faces to the bent
Of the king's look's, hath a heart that is not
Glad at the thing they scowl at.

Second Gentleman

And why so?

First Gentleman

He that hath miss'd the princess is a thing
Too bad for bad report: and he that hath her--
I mean, that married her, alack, good man!
And therefore banish'd--is a creature such
As, ~ ~


Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

Ivanhoe                             (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/+bp                            Cymbeline


1.
"CHAPTER i Thus communed these"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)/+bp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"while to their lowly dome"                        (Br/C2 + itain/T)/+bp                     Britain

3.                    <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace --- <The> full

full                 (g/C2 + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/T)/+bp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4.              Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns

"fed swine return'd with evening home"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/T)/+bp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5.       our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king

Compell'd                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/T)/+bp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6.                  Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter

reluctant                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/T)/+bp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.                    to <the> several sties

"to several sties"                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/T)/+bp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

8.                    and <the> heir of's kingdom

"With din obstreperous"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and heir of's kingdom"/T)/+bp                 "and heir of's kingdom"

9.
"and ungrateful cries"                 (wh/C2 + "-om He purposed to his wife's sole son"/T)/+bp                 "whom He purposed to his wife's sole son"

10. <a> widow That late he married --- Pope's Odyssey In that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by <the> river Don

"Pope's Odyssey In that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by river Don"                 (w/C2 + "-idow That late he married"/T)/+bp                 "widow That late he married"

11. hath referr'd herself Unto <a> poor but worthy gentleman --- there extended in ancient times <a> large forest

"there extended in ancient times large forest"                 (h/C2 + "-ath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"/T)/+bp                 "hath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"

12. covering <the> greater part of <the> beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and <the> pleasant town of Doncaster

"covering greater part of beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and pleasant town of Doncaster"                 (sh/C2 + "-e's wedded"/T)/+bp                 "she's wedded"

13.          <The> remains of this extensive wood are still to be seen at <the> noble seats of Wentworth

"remains of this extensive wood are still to be seen at noble seats of Wentworth"                 (H/C2 + "-er husband banish'd"/T)/+bp                 "Her husband banish'd"

14.
"of Warncliffe Park"                 (sh/C2 + "-e imprison'd"/T)/+bp                 "she imprison'd"

15.
"and around Rotherham"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Is outward sorrow"/T)/+bp                 "Is outward sorrow"

16. though I think <the> king Be touch'd at very heart --- Here haunted of yore <the> fabulous Dragon of Wantley

"Here haunted of yore fabulous Dragon of Wantley"                 (th/C2 + "-ough I think king Be touch'd at very heart"/T)/+bp                 "though I think king Be touch'd at very heart"

17. Second Gentleman None but <the> king --- here were fought many of <the> most desperate battles during <the> Civil Wars of <the> Roses

"here were fought many of most desperate battles during Civil Wars of Roses"                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman None but king"/T)/+bp                 "Second Gentleman None but king"

18.
"and here also flourished in ancient times those bands of gallant outlaws"                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman He that hath lost her too"/T)/+bp                 "First Gentleman He that hath lost her too"

19.               so is <the> queen

"whose deeds have been rendered so popular in English song"                 (s/C2 + "-o is queen"/T)/+bp                 "so is queen"

20.            That most desired <the> match

"Such being our chief scene"                 (Th/C2 + "-at most desired match"/T)/+bp                 "That most desired match"

21. but not <a> courtier --- <the> date of our story refers to <a> period towards <the> end of <the> reign of Richard I

"date of our story refers to period towards the end of reign of Richard i"                 (b/C2 + "-ut not courtier"/T)/+bp                 "but not courtier"

22. Although they wear their faces to <the> bent Of <the> king's look's --- when his return from his long captivity had become <an> event rather wished than hoped for by his despairing subjects

"when his return from his long captivity had become event rather wished than hoped for by his despairing subjects"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "Although they wear their faces to bent Of king's look's"/T)/+bp                 "Although they wear their faces to bent Of king's look's"

23. hath <a> heart that is not Glad at <the> thing they scowl at --- who were in <the> meantime subjected to every species of subordinate oppression

"who were in meantime subjected to every species of subordinate oppression"                 (h/C2 + "-ath heart that is not Glad at thing they scowl at"/T)/+bp                 "hath heart that is not Glad at thing they scowl at"

24.                             <The> nobles

nobles                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman And why so"/T)/+bp                 "Second Gentleman And why so"

25. First Gentleman He that hath miss'd <the> princess is <a> thing Too bad for bad report --- whose power had become exorbitant during <the> reign of Stephen

"whose power had become exorbitant during reign of Stephen"                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman He that hath miss'd princess is thing Too bad for bad report"/T)/+bp                 "First Gentleman He that hath miss'd princess is thing Too bad for bad report"

26. and whom <the> prudence of Henry <the> Second had scarce reduced to some degree of subjection to <the> crown

"and whom prudence of Henry Second had scarce reduced to some degree of subjection to crown"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and he that hath her"/T)/+bp                 "and he that hath her"

27.
"had now resumed their ancient license in its utmost extent"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "I mean"/T)/+bp                 "I mean"

28.               despising <the> feeble interference of <the> English Council of State

"despising feeble interference of English Council of State"                 (th/C2 + "-at married her"/T)/+bp                 "that married her"

29.
"fortifying their castles"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + alack/T)/+bp                 alack

30.                    increasing <the> number of their dependants

"increasing number of their dependants"                 (g/C2 + "-ood man"/T)/+bp                 "good man"

31.                    reducing all around them to <a> state of vassalage

"reducing all around them to state of vassalage"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "And therefore banish'd"/T)/+bp                 "And therefore banish'd"

32.                    is <a> creature such As

"and striving by every means in their power"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "is creature such As"/T)/+bp                 "is creature such As"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (1/4), Le retour du croisé (French)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33315/33315-h/33315-h.htm ,  
•  Ivanhoe (1/4)
Le retour du croisé

CHAPITRE PREMIER.

«C'est ainsi qu'ils parlaient, tandis qu'ils
forçaient à rentrer le soir dans l'étable leurs
troupeaux bien repus, qui témoignaient par
un bruyant grognement leur regret de renoncer
à la pâture.»
Odyssée.

Dans cet heureux vallon de la riche Angleterre, baigné par le Don aux flots purs, s'étendait jadis une forêt vaste, qui couvrait la plus grande partie des belles montagnes et des vallées qu'on aperçoit entre Sheffield et la riante ville de Doncaster 21. On voit encore des restes de cette forêt dans les magnifiques domaines de Wentworth, de Warncliffe-Park, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

"retour du croisé"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's work"/T)/+cp                 "Walter Scott's work"

Ivanhoe                             (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/+cp                            Cymbeline


1.
"CHAPITRE PREMIER"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)/+cp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"C'est ainsi qu'ils parlaient"                        (Br/C2 + itain/T)/+cp                     Britain

3. <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace --- tandis qu'ils forçaient à rentrer <le> soir dans <l'>étable leurs troupeaux bien repus

"tandis qu'ils forçaient à rentrer soir dans étable leurs troupeaux bien repus"                 (g/C2 + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/T)/+cp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4. Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns --- qui témoignaient par un bruyant grognement leur regret de renoncer à <la> pâture

"qui témoignaient par un bruyant grognement leur regret de renoncer à pâture"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/T)/+cp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5.       our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king

Odyssée                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/T)/+cp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6. Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter --- Dans cet heureux vallon de <la> riche Angleterre

"Dans cet heureux vallon de riche Angleterre"                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/T)/+cp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.                     baigné par <le> Don aux flots purs

"baigné par Don aux flots purs"                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/T)/+cp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

8.                    and <the> heir of's kingdom --- s'étendait jadis <une> forêt vaste

"s'étendait jadis forêt vaste"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and heir of's kingdom"/T)/+cp                 "and heir of's kingdom"

9. qui couvrait <la> plus grande partie des belles montagnes et des vallées qu'on aperçoit entre Sheffield et <la> riante ville de Doncaster

"qui couvrait plus grande partie des belles montagnes et des vallées qu'on aperçoit entre Sheffield et riante ville de Doncaster"                 (wh/C2 + "-om He purposed to his wife's sole son"/T)/+cp                 "whom He purposed to his wife's sole son"

10. <a> widow That late he married --- On voit encore des restes de cette forêt dans <les> magnifiques domaines de Wentworth

"On voit encore des restes de cette forêt dans magnifiques domaines de Wentworth"                 (w/C2 + "-idow That late he married"/T)/+cp                 "widow That late he married"

11.                  hath referr'd herself Unto <a> poor but worthy gentleman

"de Warncliffe"                 (h/C2 + "-ath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"/T)/+cp                 "hath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"

12.
Park                          (sh/C2 + "-e's wedded"/T)/+cp                        "she's wedded"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (2/4), Le retour du croisé (French)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34332/34332-h/34332-h.htm ,  
•  Ivanhoe (2/4)
Le retour du croisé

CHAPITRE XI.

Premier voleur.

«Halte là, monsieur; jetez-nous votre bourse si vous ne voulez pas que nous vous la prenions de force.»

Sperd.

«Nous sommes perdus! ce sont les scélérats que tous les voyageurs craignent tant.»

Valentin.

«Mes amis.....»

Premier voleur.

«Ne nous appelez pas ainsi, monsieur; nous ne sommes pas vos amis, mais vos ennemis.»

Deuxième voleur. ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

"retour du croisé"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's work"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Walter Scott's work"

Ivanhoe                          (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/Ch/+bp                           Cymbeline


1.
"CHAPITRE x i"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"Premier voleur"                           (Br/C2 + itain/T)/Ch/+bp                         Britain

3.                    <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace --- <The> full

"Halte là"                 (g/C2 + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4.              Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns

monsieur                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5.       our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king

jetez                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6. Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter --- nous votre bourse si vous ne voulez pas que nous vous <la> prenions de force

"nous votre bourse si vous ne voulez pas que nous vous prenions de force"                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.
Sperd                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

8.                    and <the> heir of's kingdom

"Nous sommes perdus"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and heir of's kingdom"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "and heir of's kingdom"

9.                ce sont <les> scélérats que tous <les> voyageurs craignent tant

"ce sont scélérats que tous voyageurs craignent tant"                 (wh/C2 + "-om He purposed to his wife's sole son"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "whom He purposed to his wife's sole son"

10.                       <a> widow That late he married

Valentin                 (w/C2 + "-idow That late he married"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "widow That late he married"

11.                    hath referr'd herself Unto <a> poor but worthy gentleman

"Mes amis"                 (h/C2 + "-ath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "hath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"

12.
"Premier voleur"                 (sh/C2 + "-e's wedded"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "she's wedded"

13.
"Ne nous appelez pas ainsi"                 (H/C2 + "-er husband banish'd"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Her husband banish'd"

14.
monsieur                    (sh/C2 + "-e imprison'd"/T)/Ch/+bp                  "she imprison'd"

15.
"nous ne sommes pas vos amis"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Is outward sorrow"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Is outward sorrow"

16.              though I think <the> king Be touch'd at very

"mais vos ennemis"                 (th/C2 + "-ough I think king Be touch'd at very heart"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "though I think king Be touch'd at very heart"

17.               Second Gentleman None but <the> king

"Deuxième voleur"                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman None but king"/T)/Ch/+bp                 "Second Gentleman None but king"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (3/4), Le retour du croisé (French)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34342/34342-h/34342-h.htm ,    
•  Ivanhoe (3/4)
Le retour du croisé

CHAPITRE XXIV.

«Je la courtiserai comme un lion courtise sa lionne.»
V. Home. Douglas.

Pendant que les scènes que nous venons de décrire se passaient dans divers points du château, la juive Rébecca attendait, dans une tour éloignée, le sort qu'on lui destinait. Elle y avait été conduite par deux de ses ravisseurs déguisés, et qui la firent entrer précipitamment dans une petite chambre, où elle se trouva en présence d'une vieille sibylle qui grommelait un air saxon, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's writing"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

"retour du croisé"                   (W/C2 + "-alter Scott's work"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's work"

Ivanhoe                          (Cym/C2 + beline/T)/Ch/+cp                           Cymbeline


1.
"CHAPITRE x x i v"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "ACT i SCENE i"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2                Je <la> courtiserai comme <un> lion courtise sa lionne
.
"Je courtiserai comme lion courtise sa lionne"                        (Br/C2 + itain/T)/Ch/+cp                     Britain

3.                      <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace

"v"                 (g/C2 + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4.               Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns

Home                 ([ŋ=  y=]/C2 + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5.       our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king

Douglas                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6. Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter --- Pendant que <les> scènes que nous venons de décrire se passaient dans divers points du château

"Pendant que scènes que nous venons de décrire se passaient dans divers points du château"                 (S/C2 + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.                  <la> juive Rébecca attendait

"juive Rébecca attendait"                 (F/C2 + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

8.                    and <the> heir of's kingdom --- dans <une> tour éloignée

"dans tour éloignée"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/C2 + "and heir of's kingdom"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "and heir of's kingdom"

9.                    <le> sort qu'on lui destinait

"sort qu'on lui destinait"                 (wh/C2 + "-om He purposed to his wife's sole son"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "whom He purposed to his wife's sole son"

10.                  <a> widow That late he married

"Elle y avait été conduite par deux de ses ravisseurs déguisés"                 (w/C2 + "-idow That late he married"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "widow That late he married"

11. hath referr'd herself Unto <a> poor but worthy gentleman --- et qui <la> firent entrer précipitamment dans <une> petite chambre

"et qui firent entrer précipitamment dans petite chambre"                 (h/C2 + "-ath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"/T)/Ch/+cp                 "hath referr'd herself Unto poor but worthy gentleman"

12.              où elle se trouva en présence d<'une> vieille sibylle qui grommelait <un> air saxon

" où elle se trouva en présence d vieille sibylle qui grommelait air saxon"                      (sh/C2 + "-e's wedded"/T)/Ch/+cp                    "she's wedded"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (4/4), Le retour du croisé (French)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34608/34608-h/34608-h.htm ,  
•  Ivanhoe (4/4)
Le retour du croisé

Chapitre XXXV

A exciter le tigre d'Hyrcanie ou à disputer sa proie au lion affamé, il y a moins de péril qu'à rallumer le feu mal éteint du Fanatisme sauvage.
ANONYME.

Revenons maintenant sur les traces d'Isaac d'York.--Monté sur une mule, présent de l'Outlaw, et accompagé de deux robustes yeomen pour le guider et le protéger, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

"retour du croisé"                    (W/T + "-alter Scott's work"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Walter Scott's work"

Ivanhoe                          (Cymb/T + eline/GC/S/abT)/+bp                       Cymbeline


1.            Chapitre XXXV A exciter <le> tigre d'Hyrcanie ou à disputer sa proie au lion affamé

"Chapitre x x x v A exciter tigre d'Hyrcanie ou à disputer sa proie au lion affamé"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.              il y a moins de péril qu'à rallumer <le> feu mal éteint du Fanatisme sauvage

"il y a moins de péril qu'à rallumer feu mal éteint du Fanatisme sauvage"                        (Br/T + itain/GC/S/abT)/+bp                     Britain

3.                    <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace

ANONYME                 (g/T + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4. Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns --- Revenons maintenant sur <les> traces d'Isaac d'York

"Revenons maintenant sur traces d'Isaac d'York"                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5. our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king --- Monté sur <une> mule

"Monté sur une mule"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6.                  Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter --- présent de <l'>Outlaw

"présent de Outlaw"                 (S/T + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.                et accompagé de deux robustes yeomen pour <le> guider et <le> protéger

"et accompagé de deux robustes yeomen pour guider et protéger"                 (F/T + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/GC/S/abT)/+bp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

Et cetera.



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between    Walter Scott's   "Ivanhoe (Dutch)"    and    William Shakespeare's    "Cymbeline"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26564/26564-h/26564-h.htm ,    
•  Ivanhoe (Dutch) (as Author)

Eerste Hoofdstuk.

Zoo spraken ze, onderwijl de herder voor den nacht
Het vette zwijnenheir van ’t veld weer huiswaarts bracht,
Dat, onder luid geschreeuw en lastig tegenstreven,
Een ieder naar zijn kot, met moeite werd gedreven.

Odyssee.

In die aangename streken van het schoone Engeland, welke door de rivier de Don bespoeld worden, ~ ~


http://shakespeare.mit.edu/cymbeline/full.html ,  
William Shakespeare's "Cymbeline"

Ivanhoe                   (W/T + "-alter Scott's writing"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Walter Scott's writing"

Ivanhoe                           (Cymb/T + eline/C2)/Ch/+cp                         Cymbeline


1.
"Eerste Hoofdstuk"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ACT i SCENE i"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "ACT i SCENE i"

2.
"Zoo spraken ze"                           (Br/T + itain/C2)/Ch/+cp                         Britain

3.                      <The> garden of Cymbeline's palace

"onderwijl de herder voor den nacht Het vette zwijnenheir van ’t veld weer huiswaarts bracht"                 (g/T + "-arden of Cymbeline's palace"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "garden of Cymbeline's palace"

4.               Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet <a> man but frowns

Dat                 ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Enter two Gentlemen First Gentleman You do not meet man but frowns"

5.       our bloods No more obey <the> heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does <the> king

"onder luid geschreeuw en lastig tegenstreven"                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "our bloods No more obey heavens than our courtiers Still seem as does king"

6.               Second Gentleman But what's <the> matter

"Een ieder naar zijn kot"                 (S/T + "-econd Gentleman But what's matter"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "Second Gentleman But what's matter"

7.
"met moeite werd gedreven"                 (F/T + "-irst Gentleman His daughter"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "First Gentleman His daughter"

8.                    and <the> heir of's kingdom

Odyssee                 ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "and heir of's kingdom"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "and heir of's kingdom"

9.
"In die aangename streken van het schoone Engeland"                 (wh/T + "-om He purposed to his wife's sole son"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "whom He purposed to his wife's sole son"

10.                  <a> widow That late he married

"welke door de rivier de Don bespoeld worden"                 (w/T + "-idow That late he married"/C2)/Ch/+cp                 "widow That late he married"

Et cetera.





















Mark Twain
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Mark+Twain ,  

*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Blacklock" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("James Macpherson" /T)/S  >>  ("John Langhorne" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Robert Burns" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Mark Twain" /C1/Ch)/GC/S/abT





Jane Austen
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Jane+Austen ,  

*           "Walter Scott"  >>  ("James Ballantyne" /T)/P  >>  ("Thomas Blacklock" /T/Ch)/P  >>  ("James Macpherson" /T)/S  >>  ("John Langhorne" /T/Ch)/S  >>  ("Robert Burns" /T)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Mark Twain" /C1/Ch)/GC/S/abT  >>  ("Jane Austen" /C1)/GC/S/abT



Stendhal
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Stendhal ,  

*               Aristophanes  >>   (Stendhal /P/Ch)/C1

>>               Marie-Henri Beyle,    better known by his pen name Stendhal

*         Stendhal  >>  "Marie-Henri Beyle" /S

Born                                23 January 1783                         Grenoble, France
Died                           23 March 1842 (aged 59)                         Paris, France

"1783"                                (St/P + endhal/C2)/+bp                             Stendhal
January                                (St/P + endhal/C2)/+cp                            Stendhal
"23"                                (St/P + endhal/C2)/Ch/+bp                            Stendhal
"Grenoble, France"                      (St/P + endhal/C2)/Ch/+cp                       Stendhal

"1642"                             (St/P + endhal/GC/S/abT)/+bp                         Stendhal
March                              (St/P + endhal/GC/S/abT)/+cp                         Stendhal
"23"                            (St/P + endhal/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+bp                         Stendhal
"Paris, France"                    (St/P + endhal/GC/S/abT)/Ch/+cp                       Stendhal


*  For Stendhal and his works,    I find phonetics correspondences in English,   not in French or German.


http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s#a418 ,  
•  L'Abbesse De Castro (French) (as Author)
•  Die Abtissin von Castro (German) (as Author)
•  Amitié amoureuse (French) (as Commentator)
•  Les Cenci (French) (as Author)

•  La Chartreuse De Parme (French) (as Author)
•  La Duchesse De Palliano (French) (as Author)
•  Le Rouge et le noir (French) (as Author)
•  Vittoria Accoramboni (French) (as Author)

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/stendhal/ ,  
•      Armance / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1827]
•       The Red and the Black / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1830]
•       The Charterhouse of Parma / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1839]
•       Vanina Vanini / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1829]

•       The Abbess of Castro / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1832]
•       The Cenci / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1832]
•       The Duchess of Palliano / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1832]
•       Vittoria Accoramboni / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1837]

Armance                       (St/T + "-endhal's work"/P)/+cp                   "Stendhal's work"
"Red and Black"                    (St/T + "-endhal's work"/S)/+cp                    "Stendhal's work"
"Charterhouse of Parma"                (St/T + "-endhal's work"/C2)/+cp                 "Stendhal's work"
"Vanina Vanini"                 (St/T + "-endhal's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp               "Stendhal's work"

"Abbess of Castro"                 (S/P + "-tendhal's work"/T)/+cp                  "Stendhal's work"
Cenci                         (St/P + "-endhal's work"/S)/+cp                    "Stendhal's work"
"Duchess of Palliano"                 (St/P + "-endhal's work"/C2)/+cp                 "Stendhal's work"
"Vittoria Accoramboni"               (St/P + "-endhal's work"/GC/S/abT)/+cp                "Stendhal's work"

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a#a965 ,    
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

Armance                                (Lys/T + istrata/P)/+cp                           Lysistrata
"Red and Black"                        (Lys/T + istrata/S)/+cp                            Lysistrata
"Charterhouse of Parma"                 (Lys/T + istrata/C2)/+cp                         Lysistrata
"Vanina Vanini"                      (Lys/T + istrata /GC/S/abT)/+cp                      Lysistrata

"Abbess of Castro"                       (Ly/P + sistrata/T)/+cp                          Lysistrata
Cenci                                   (Lys/P + istrata/S)/+cp                            Lysistrata
"Duchess of Palliano"                      (Lys/P + istrata/C2)/+cp                        Lysistrata
"Vittoria Accoramboni"                    (Lys/P + istrata/GC/S/abT)/+cp                  Lysistrata



>>     Phonetic correspondence   between      Stendhal'S  "The Red and the Black"  and     Aristophanes' "Lysistrata"

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7700/7700-h/7700-h.htm ,  
Lysistrata

LYSISTRATA stands alone with the Propylaea at her back.

LYSISTRATA

If they were trysting for a Bacchanal,
A feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis,
The tambourines would block the rowdy streets,
But now there's not a woman to be seen
Except--ah, yes--this neighbour of mine yonder.

Enter CALONICE.

Good day Calonice.

CALONICE

Good day Lysistrata.
But what has vexed you so? Tell me, child.
What are these black looks for? It doesn't suit you
To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that.

LYSISTRATA

Calonice, it's more than I can bear,
I am hot all over with blushes for our sex.
Men say we're slippery rogues--

CALONICE

And aren't they right?

LYSISTRATA

Yet summoned on the most tremendous business
For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed.

CALONICE

My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know,
To get away. There's so much to do;
Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers:
Servants to be poked out: children washed
Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap.

LYSISTRATA

But I tell you, here's a far more weighty object.

CALONICE

What is it all about, dear Lysistrata,
That you've called the women hither in a troop?
What kind of an object is it?

LYSISTRATA

A tremendous thing!

CALONICE

And long?

LYSISTRATA

Indeed, it may be very lengthy.

CALONICE

Then why aren't they here?

LYSISTRATA

No man's connected with it;
If that was the case, they'd soon come fluttering along.~ ~


http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/stendhal/red/ ,      
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/stendhal/red/book1.html ,  
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/stendhal/red/book1.1.html ,  
•       The Red and the Black / translated by C. K. Scott-Moncrieff [1830]

A Chronicle of the Nineteenth Century

BOOK ONE

The truth, the harsh truth

DANTON

Chapter 1
A Small Town

Put thousands together

Less bad,

But the cage less gay.

HOBBES

The small town of Verrieres may be regarded as one of the most attractive in the Franche–Comte. Its white houses with their high pitched roofs of red tiles are spread over the slope of a hill, the slightest contours of which are indicated by clumps of sturdy chestnuts. The Doubs runs some hundreds of feet below its fortifications, built in times past by the Spaniards, and now in ruins.

Verrieres is sheltered on the north by a high mountain, a spur of the Jura. The jagged peaks of the Verra put on a mantle of snow in the first cold days of October. A torrent which comes tearing down from the mountain passes through Verrieres before emptying its waters into the Doubs, and supplies power to a great number of sawmills; this is an extremely simple industry, and procures a certain degree of comfort for the majority of the inhabitants, who are of the peasant rather than of the burgess class. It is not, however, the sawmills that have made this little town rich. It is to the manufacture of printed calicoes, known as Mulhouse stuffs, that it owes the general prosperity which, since the fall of Napoleon, has led to the refacing of almost all the houses in Verrieres.

No sooner has one entered the town than one is startled by the din of a noisy machine of terrifying aspect. A score of weighty hammers, falling with a clang which makes the pavement tremble, are raised aloft by a wheel which the water of the torrent sets in motion. Each of these hammers turns out, daily, ~ ~


"Red and Black"                    (St/T + "-endhal's work"/S)/+cp                    "Stendhal's work"

"Red and Black"                        (Lys/T + istrata/S)/+cp                            Lysistrata


1. LYSISTRATA stands alone with <the> Propylaea at her back --- <A> Chronicle of <the> Nineteenth Century

"Chronicle of Nineteenth Century"                  (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA stands alone with Propylaea at her back"

2.          LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for <a> Bacchanal --- BOOK ONE <The> truth

"BOOK ONE truth"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA If they were trysting for Bacchanal"

3. <A> feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis --- <the> harsh truth DANTON Chapter 1 <A> Small Town Put thousands together Less bad

"harsh truth DANTON Chapter i Small Town Put thousands together Less bad"                   (f/T + "-east of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"/S)/+cp                  "feast of Pan or Colias or Genetyllis"

4.             <The> tambourines would block <the> rowdy streets --- But <the> cage less gay

"But cage less gay"                  (t/T + "-ambourines would block rowdy streets"/S)/+cp                  "tambourines would block rowdy streets"

5. But now there's not <a> woman to be seen Except --- HOBBES <The> small town of Verrieres may be regarded as one of <the> most attractive in <the> Franche

"HOBBES small town of Verrieres may be regarded as one of most attractive in Franche"                   (B/T + "-ut now there's not woman to be seen Except"/S)/+cp                  "But now there's not woman to be seen Except"

6.
Comte                          ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "ah, yes"/S)/+cp                          "ah, yes"

7.    Its white houses with their high pitched roofs of red tiles are spread over <the> slope of <a> hill

"Its white houses with their high pitched roofs of red tiles are spread over slope of hill"                   (th/T + "-is neighbour of mine yonder"/S)/+cp                  "this neighbour of mine yonder"

8.               <the> slightest contours of which are indicated by clumps of sturdy chestnuts

"slightest contours of which are indicated by clumps of sturdy chestnuts"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "Enter CALONICE"/S)/+cp                    "Enter CALONICE"

9.                <The> Doubs runs some hundreds of feet below its fortifications

"Doubs runs some hundreds of feet below its fortifications"                   (G/T + "-ood day Calonice"/S)/+cp                  "Good day Calonice"

10.                      built in times past by <the> Spaniards

"built in times past by Spaniards"                 (C/T + "-ALONICE Good day Lysistrata"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE Good day Lysistrata"

11.
"and now in ruins"                   (B/T + "-ut what has vexed you so"/S)/+cp                  "But what has vexed you so"

12.                 Verrieres is sheltered on <the> north by <a> high mountain

"Verrieres is sheltered on north by high mountain"                   (T/T + "-ell me, child"/S)/+cp                  "Tell me, child"

13.                    <a> spur of <the> Jura

"spur of Jura"                   (Wh/T + "-at are these black looks for"/S)/+cp                  "What are these black looks for"

14. <The> jagged peaks of <the> Verra put on <a> mantle of snow in <the> first cold days of October

"jagged peaks of Verra put on mantle of snow in first cold days of October"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"/S)/+cp                  "It doesn't suit you To knit your eyebrows up glumly like that"

15. <A> torrent which comes tearing down from <the> mountain passes through Verrieres before emptying its waters into <the> Doubs

"torrent which comes tearing down from mountain passes through Verrieres before emptying its waters into Doubs"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA Calonice, it's more than I can bear"

16.                  and supplies power to <a> great number of sawmills

"and supplies power to great number of sawmills"                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"/S)/+cp                  "I am hot all over with blushes for our sex. Men say we're slippery rogues"

17.                    this is <an> extremely simple industry

"this is extremely simple industry"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE And aren't they right"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE And aren't they right"

18. LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on <the> most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed --- and procures <a> certain degree of comfort for <the> majority of <the> inhabitants

"and procures certain degree of comfort for majority of inhabitants"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA Yet summoned on most tremendous business For deliberation, still they snuggle in bed"

19.                     who are of <the> peasant rather than of <the> burgess class

"who are of peasant rather than of burgess class"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE My dear, they'll come. It's hard for women, you know, To get away"

20.
"It is not"                   (Th /T + " -ere's so much to do"/S)/+cp                  "There's so much to do"

21.
however                   (H/T + "-usbands to be patted and put in good tempers"/S)/+cp                  "Husbands to be patted and put in good tempers"

22.                    <the> sawmills that have made this little town rich

"sawmills that have made this little town rich"                   (S/T + "-ervants to be poked out"/S)/+cp                  "Servants to be poked out"

23.                      It is to <the> manufacture of printed calicoes

"It is to manufacture of printed calicoes"                   (ch/T + "-ildren washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"/S)/+cp                  "children washed Or soothed with lullays or fed with mouthfuls of pap"

24.              LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's <a> far more weighty object

"known as Mulhouse stuffs"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA But I tell you, here's far more weighty object"

25.                that it owes <the> general prosperity which

"that it owes general prosperity which"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE What is it all about, dear Lysistrata"

26.            That you've called <the> women hither in <a> troop --- since <the> fall of Napoleon

"since fall of Napoleon"                  (Th/T + "- at you've called women hither in troop"/S)/+cp                  "That you've called women hither in troop "

27.        What kind of <an> object is it --- has led to <the> refacing of almost all <the> houses in Verrieres

"has led to refacing of almost all houses in Verrieres"                  (Wh/T + "-at kind of object is it"/S)/+cp                  "What kind of object is it"

28. LYSISTRATA <A> tremendous thing --- No sooner has one entered <the> town than one is startled by <the> din of <a> noisy machine of terrifying aspect

"No sooner has one entered town than one is startled by din of noisy machine of terrifying aspect"                  (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA tremendous thing"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA tremendous thing"

29.                     <A> score of weighty hammers

"score of weighty hammers"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE And long"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE And long"

30.                  falling with <a> clang which makes <the> pavement tremble

"falling with clang which makes pavement tremble"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA Indeed, it may be very lengthy"

31.               are raised aloft by <a> wheel which <the> water of <the> torrent sets in motion

"are raised aloft by wheel which water of torrent sets in motion"                   (C/T + "-ALONICE Then why aren't they here"/S)/+cp                  "CALONICE Then why aren't they here"

32.
"Each of these hammers turns out"                   (LYS/T + "-ISTRATA No man's connected with it"/S)/+cp                  "LYSISTRATA No man's connected with it"

33.              If that was <the> case, they'd soon come fluttering along

daily                   ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"/S)/+cp                  "If that was case, they'd soon come fluttering along"

Et cetera.

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DATE: 2011.10.05 - 20:06


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