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(Comparative) study (in structure/mode/ways of pronunciation, articulation, phonetics, or whatever; that is, in differences of speaking mouth postures and resultant speaking weight/force center points) between English/foreign languages and mother tongue, for better (more practical/effective/smooth) hearing/speaking of English/foreign languages.       Copyright.   Young-Won Kim,   yw@voicespec.com
open : home | brd2 | Kor | book | FUN member : main II | Kor II


::: Comparative phonetics, main :::


596 12 View counter   Join Member Login Admin
Name   Young-Won Kim
Subject   avenge, scold, anxious, 'auxiliary verb', off, ugly/clever, absolute (term), like, run, able, hardly,           M&M

49.                            avenge/revenge

Re :   Article of  "alienism, exot(ci)sm, revenge, extant, actual(ly), ugly, surly,  current/heart/Hist?  headquarter(s), bake(ry)"         <<Column 14.  revenge,  avenge (on)>>

   http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_/avenging.html ,    
Word Usage
avenge or revenge?
Both words are about repaying a wrong.          The differences between them have to do with grammar and shades of meaning, though there is considerable overlap in meaning,   dictated by usage over time.        Grammatically speaking, avenge is a verb only;   revenge is a verb and more usually a noun.        Avenge traditionally relates not only to repaying a wrong but to getting justice on somebody else's behalf as a remedy for that wrong  (They vowed to avenge their sister's murder [or their murdered sister]).         Revenge, often connoting malice, traditionally relates to getting even with an adversary by inflicting punishment or harm  (In an act of revenge for the bombing of our ship, our navy shelled the terrorists' training camps;   Bands of irregular soldiers set out to revenge their leader's assassination).        Though both avenge and revenge can be used as transitive verbs with reflexive pronouns,   revenge is commoner in this use:    The dictatorship avenged itself on the partisans' radio station by burning it to the ground;    As a victim of a hate crime, she finally avenged herself on the perpetrators.
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/avenge ,    
USAGE:       The use of avenge with a reflexive pronoun was formerly considered incorrect,    but is now acceptable:       she avenged herself on the man who killed her daughter.
   http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_/revenge.html ,  
USAGE     In the past it was considered incorrect to use avenge with yourself,   but this use is now acceptable and relatively common:      she was determined to avenge herself upon this monster.

*  ("have-punish" /C1/+-/SS/abE)/abThr >> avenge(보복되다-v.i.) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> revenge(앙갚음되다-v.i.) /GC/P/abT
*  ("be-punish" /C1/+-/SS/abE)/abD >> penalise(처형하다-v.t.) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> penalize(유죄로 선고하다-v.t.) /GC/P/abT

avenge                         (t/C1 + "-ake revenge"/S)/Ch                        "take revenge"

revenge                           (t/S + "-ake revenge"/C1)                         "take revenge"
revenge                 ([ŋ=  w=]/S + "an eye for an eye"/C2)                 "an eye for an eye"


*                        avenge  >>  "avenge oneself" /mGC/abE


tr.v. a•venged, a•veng•ing, a•veng•es
1. To inflict a punishment or penalty in return for; revenge: avenge a murder.
2. To take vengeance on behalf of: avenged their wronged parents.

*                  "avenge on ~"  >>  "avenge ~" /mGC/abE/Ch  >>  "revenge ~" /mGC/abE
*              "take revenge for ~"  >>  "avenge ~" /mGC/abE/Ch  >>  "revenge ~" /mGC/abE



50.                                  scold
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/scold ,  
Word History:   A scold is not usually a poet and a scolding rarely sounds like poetry to the one being scolded, but it seems that the word scold has a poetic background. It is probable that scold, first recorded in Middle English in a work probably composed around 1150, has a Scandinavian source related to the Old Icelandic word skald, "poet." Middle English scolde may in fact mean "a minstrel," but of that we are not sure. However, its Middle English meanings, "a ribald abusive person" and "a shrewish chiding woman," may be related to skald, as shown by the senses of some of the Old Icelandic words derived from skald. Old Icelandic skaldskapr, for example, meant "poetry" in a good sense but also "a libel in verse," while skald-stöng meant "a pole with imprecations or charms scratched on it." It would seem that libelous cursing verse was a noted part of at least some poets' productions and that this association with poets passed firmly along with the Scandinavian borrowing into English.

*  ("be-chastise" /C1/+bp/SS/abE)/abD >> scold(꾸짖다-v.t.) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> blame(저주하다-v.t.) /GC/P/abT
*  ("have-chastise" /C1/+bp/SS/abE)/abThr >> lecture(꾸지람을 듣다-v.i.) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> carpet(책망을 받다-v.i.) /GC/P/abT

*                        scold  >>  skald /mGC/abE/+cp

**                  skald /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch  >>  poet /P

*                          poet /P/Ch  >>  scolde /mGC/abT

**                     scolde /mGC/abT/Ch  >>  minstrel /C2

*   skald  >>  ("a ribald abusive person" /T)/P  >>  ("a shrewish chiding woman" /T/Ch)/P  >>  skaldskapr /mGC/abE/Ch

**   skaldskapr /mGC/abE  >>  poetry /P  >>  ("a libel in verse" /C2)/T  >>  ("skald-stöng" /C2/Ch)/T

*  ("skald-stöng" /C2)/T  >>  "a pole with imprecations or charms scratched on it" /mGC/abT/+bp



51.                     anxious/eager/dying, ardent/yearning,          auxiliary verbs
A)
Re:  Article of  "<<a=i, Λ=i, o=i, u=i>>  identify(v.intr?),  be-anxious/eager/dying/ardent/yearning-to,  Sylvia,  angry-at "    <<column 6. "be anxious to"/angrily; "be eager to"/urgently; "be dying to"/desperately; "be ardent to"/sincerely; "be yearning to"/piously
>>

   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/anxious ,  
Usage Note:   Anxious has a long history of use roughly as a synonym for eager, but many prefer that anxious be used only when its subject is worried or uneasy about the anticipated event. In the traditional view, one may say We are anxious to see the strike settled soon but not We are anxious to see the new show of British sculpture at the museum. Fifty-two percent of the Usage Panel rejects anxious in the latter sentence. But general adoption of anxious to mean "eager" is understandable, at least in colloquial discourse, since it provides a means of adding emotional urgency to an assertion. It implies that the subject so strongly desires a certain outcome that frustration of that desire will lead to unhappiness. In this way, it resembles the informal adjective dying in sentences such as I'm dying to see your new baby.

*                asking/P/pES/Ch  >>  (eager/GC/S/abT/Ch, anxious/GC/S/abT)

"be anxious to"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/P + angrily/C1)                          angrily
"be eager to"                         ([ŋ=  w=]/P + urgently/C1)                          urgently
"be dying to"                           (d/P + esperately/C1)                           desperately

*           "be anxious to"  >>  (angrily /P)/C1  >>  (hopefully /T)/C1  >>  (inevitably /S)/C1
*           "be eager to"  >>  (urgently /P)/C1  >>  (extremely /T)/C1  >>  (completely /S)/C1
*          "be dying to"  >>  (desperately /P)/C1  >>  (optimistically /T)/C1  >>  (dirtily /S)/C1

"be anxious to"                         (h/T + opefully/C1)                                hopefully
"be eager to"                         ([ŋ=  y=]/T + extremely/C1)                      extremely
"be dying to"                      ([ŋ=  w=]/T + optimistically/C1)                   optimistically

"be anxious to"                       ([ŋ=  y=]/S + inevitably/C1)                       inevitably
"be eager to"                           (c/S + ompletely/C1)                            completely
"be dying to"                               (d/S + irtily/C1)                                   dirtily

---------

"be ardent to"                            (s/P + incerely/C1)                               sincerely
"be yearning to"                           (p/P + iously/C1)                                 piously

*          "be ardent to"  >>  (sincerely /P)/C1  >>  (carefully /T)/C1  >>  (significantly /S)/C1
*         "be yearning to"  >>  (piously /P)/C1  >>  (piteously /T)/C1  >>  (thoughtfully /S)/C1

"be ardent to"                             (c/T + arefully/C1)                               carefully
"be yearning to"                           (p/T + iteously/C1)                             piteously

"be ardent to"                          (s/S + ignificantly/C1)                           significantly
"be yearning to"                        (t/S + houghtfully/C1)                          thoughtfully

B)
Re:    Article of    "seldom/sure:  why not aux. v.?   Verbal  go (a)fishing   'be to'  afire  mine/yours   phrase"         <<Column 1.  seldom/perhaps/sure/habitually:     if so, why not auxiliary verbs?>>

"want to"                                   (s/P + eldom/C1)                                seldom
"seem to"                                  (p/P + erhaps/C1)                               perhaps
"come to"                                    (s/P + ure/C1)                                    sure
"use to"                                  (h/P + abitually/C1)                             habitually
"be willing to"                             (w/P + illingly/C1)                                willingly
"dare to"                           ([ŋ=  y=]/P + extremely/C1)                         extremely
"force to"                              (c/P + ompetitively/C1)                         competitively

*                 "want to"  >>  (seldom /P)/C1  >>  (intensely /T)/C1  >>  (aptly /S)/C1
*                 "seem to"  >>  (perhaps /P)/C1  >>  (almost /T)/C1  >>  (about/S)/C1
*                   "come to"  >>  (sure /P)/C1  >>  (maybe /T)/C1  >>  (timely /S)/C1
*           "use to"  >>  (habitually /P)/C1  >>  (conventionally /T)/C1  >>  (cheerfully /S)/C1
*             "be willing to"  >>  (willingly /P)/C1  >>  (eagerly /T)/C1  >>  (chancily/S)/C1
*           "dare to"  >>  (extremely /P)/C1  >>  (daringly /T)/C1  >>  (ultimately /S)/C1
*              "force to"  >>  (competitively /P)/C1  >>  (dare /T)/C1  >>  (obligingly/S)/C1

"want to"                              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + intensely/C1)                        intensely
"seem to"                               ([ŋ=  w=]/T + almost/C1)                           almost
"come to"                                  (m/T + aybe/C1)                                  maybe
"use to"                                (c/T + onventionally/C1)                      conventionally
"be willing to"                           ([ŋ=  y=]/T + eagerly/C1)                          eagerly
"dare to"                                  (d/T + aringly/C1)                                daringly
"force to"                                   (d/T + are/C1)                                     dare

"want to"                                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + aptly/C1)                             aptly
"seem to"                               ([ŋ=  w=]/S + about/C1)                            about
"come to"                                  (t/S + imely/C1)                                  timely
"use to"                                  (c/S + heerfully/C1)                             cheerfully
"be willing to"                             (c/S + hancily/C1)                                chancily
"dare to"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + ultimately/C1)                         ultimately
"force to"                           ([ŋ=  w=]/S + obligingly/C1)                         obligingly


C)                   auxiliary verbs

Re: Article of    "numbers/sP,  Seed?? <<t>>. Modal aux. v.??  Liaison-hole  Inf./ger. & prosody"         <<Column 4.  (Modal) auxiliary verb or (simple) adverb??   Column 5.  INFINITIVE/GERUND??>>

***                         "I will"  >>  "I shall" /mGC/abE/+cp
***                           must  >>  should /mGC/abT
***                            may  >>  ought /mGC/abE/Ch
***                        "use to"  >>  "used to" /mGC/abE/+cp

***                             will  >>  would /mGC/abE/+bp
***                            shall  >>  should /mGC/abE
***                             can  >>  could /mGC/abR
***                            may  >>  might /mGC/abE/+cp

***                         adverb  >>  "auxiliary verb" /mGC/abR
***                             must  >>  "have (haf) to" /mGC/abR
***                             must  >>  "had to" /mGC/abE/+cp


*             "be able to"  >>  ("without difficulty" /P)/C1  >>  (well /T)/C1  >>  (can /S)/C1
*             "be going to"  >>  ("in future" /P)/C1  >>  (soon /T)/C1  >>  (will /S)/C1
*       "be permitted to"  >>  (permissively /P)/C1  >>  ("in freedom" /T)/C1  >>  (may /S)/C1
*             "have to"  >>  ("in force" /P)/C1  >>  (compellingly/T)/C1  >>  (must/S)/C1

"be able to"                      (w/P + "-ithout difficulty"/C1)                   "without difficulty"
"be going to"                     ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in future"/C1)                          "in future"
"be permitted to"                         (p/P + ermissively/C1)                       permissively
"have to"                           ([ŋ=  y=]/P + "in force"/C1)                          "in force"

"be able to"                                   (w/T + ell/C1)                                   well
"be going to"                                 (s/T + oon/C1)                                  soon
"be permitted to"                    ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "in freedom"/C1)                   "in freedom"
"have to"                              (c/T + ompellingly/C1)                           compellingly

"be able to"                                     (c/S + an/C1)                                   can
"be going to"                                    (w/S + ill/C1)                                   will
"be permitted to"                               (m/S + ay/C1)                                  may
"have to"                                       (m/S + ust /C1)                                must

   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/able ,  
Usage Note:      The construction  able to  takes an infinitive to show the subject's ability to accomplish an action:   We were able to get a grant for the project.     The new submarine is able to dive twice as fast as the older model.     Some people think it should be avoided when the subject does not have an ability, as in sentences with passive constructions involving forms of the verb be:    The problem was able to be solved by using a new lab technique.     The reasoning here is that since the problem has no ability to accomplish an action,  it is not able to do anything, and therefore able to should not be used.     Presumably this ban would apply to similar words like capable and to negative words like unable and incapable.      In such cases one can usually avoid the problem by using can or could:    The problem could be solved....      Keep in mind, however, that passives with get ascribe a more active role to their subjects, and here one can use able to:    He was able to get accepted by a top law school.



52.                                off
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/off ,  
Usage Note:   The compound preposition off of is generally regarded as informal and is best avoided in formal speech and writing: He stepped off (not off of) the platform. Off is informal as well when used to indicate a source: formal style requires I borrowed it from (not off) my brother.

*                         off  >>  "off of" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                         from  >>  off /mGC/abE/+bp



53.                                ugly/clever
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ugly ,  
Regional Note:   The standard sense of the adjective ugly becomes figurative in the common expression an ugly temper. Regional American speech shares this figurative sense and makes it even more specific. In New England ugly as applied to animals, especially large farm animals such as cows and horses, means "balky, hard to manage." In the South, on the other hand, ugly with the specific sense of "rude" is used of persons: Don't be ugly, son. Interestingly, the word clever (senses 4 through 6) follows the same regional pattern as ugly: in New England the specialized senses refer to animals; in the South, to persons.
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/clever ,  
Regional Note:   In the 17th and 18th centuries, in addition to its basic sense of "able to use the brain readily and effectively," the word clever acquired a constellation of imprecise but generally positive senses in regional British speech: "clean-limbed and handsome," "neat and convenient to use," and "of an agreeable disposition." Some of these British regional senses, brought over when America was colonized, are still found in American regional speech, as in the South, where clever can mean "good-natured, amiable" in old-fashioned speech. The speech of New England extends the meaning "good-natured" to animals in the specific sense of "easily managed, docile." Perhaps it was the association with animals that gave rise to another meaning, "affable but not especially smart," applicable to people when used in old-fashioned New England dialects.


ugly                                   (h/T + omely/P)/Ch                                   homely
ugly                                    (n/T + asty/P)/Ch                                     nasty
ugly                                   (sp/T + iteful/P)/Ch                                   spiteful

*                      ugly  >>  "balky, hard to manage" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                      "Don't be rude"  >>  "Don't be ugly" /mGC/abE/+bp


clever                                  (w/T + itty/P)/Ch                                      witty
clever                              ([ŋ=  y=]/T + inventive/P)/Ch                         inventive
clever                                (d/T + exterous/P)/Ch                               dexterous

*  clever  >> "clean-limbed and handsome" /mGC/abE/+cp >> "neat and convenient to use" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch >> "of an agreeable disposition" /mGC/abT/Ch >> "good-natured, amiable" /mGC/abR/Ch

**                    "good-natured, amiable" /mGC/abT  >>  "good-natured" /mGC/abE/Ch

**             "good-natured, amiable" /mGC/abT  >>  "easily managed, docile" /mGC/abT/Ch

***          "easily managed, docile" /mGC/abT  >>  "affable but not especially smart" /mGC/abT


54.                        absolute (term)
A)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/absolute ,  
Usage Note:  An absolute term denotes a property that a thing either can or cannot have. Such terms include absolute itself, chief, complete, perfect, prime, unique, and mathematical terms such as equal and parallel. By strict logic, absolute terms cannot be compared, as by more and most, or used with an intensive modifier, such as very or so. Something either is complete or it isn't --- it cannot be more complete than something else. Consequently, sentences such as He wanted to make his record collection more complete, and You can improve the sketch by making the lines more perpendicular, are often criticized as illogical. • Such criticism confuses pure logic or a mathematical ideal with the rough approximations that are frequently needed in ordinary language. Certainly in some contexts we should use words strictly logically; otherwise teaching mathematics would be impossible. But we often think in terms of a scale or continuum rather than in clearly marked either/or categories. Thus, we may think of a statement as either logically true or false, but we also know that there are degrees of truthfulness and falsehood. Similarly, there may be degrees of completeness to a record collection, and some lines may be more perpendicular --- that is, they may more nearly approximate mathematical perpendicularity --- than other lines. • Accordingly, the objection to modification of an absolute term like parallel by degree seems absurd when it is used metaphorically, as in The difficulties faced by the Republicans are quite parallel to those that confronted the Democrats four years ago. This statement describes the structural correspondence between two distinct situations, and concerns about the possibility of intersection seem remote indeed. In this sense, parallelism is clearly a matter of degree, so one should not hesitate to modify parallel accordingly. See Usage Notes at equal, infinite, unique.

He wanted to make his record collection more complete.
You can improve the sketch by making the lines more perpendicular.
The difficulties faced by the Republicans are quite parallel to those that confronted the Democrats four years ago.

*                     complete  >>  "more complete" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     perpendicular  >>  "more perpendicular" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                     similar  >>  "quite parallel" /mGC/abT/+cp

B)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/equal ,  
Usage Note:   It has been argued that equal is an absolute term --- two quantities either are or are not equal --- and hence cannot be qualified as to degree. Therefore one cannot logically speak of a more equal allocation of resources among the departments. However, this usage was accepted by 71 percent of the Usage Panel in an earlier survey. Objections to the more equal construction rest on the assumption that the mathematical notion of equality is appropriate to the description of a world where the equality of two quantities is often an approximate matter, and where statements of equality are always relative to an implicit standard of tolerance. When someone says The two boards are of equal length, we assume that the equality is reckoned to some order of approximation determined by the context; if we did not, we would be required always to use nearly equal when speaking of the dimensions of physical objects. What is more, we often speak of the equality of things that cannot be measured quantitatively, as when we say The college draft was introduced in an effort to make the teams in the National Football League as equal as possible, or The candidates for the job should all be given equal consideration. In all such cases equality is naturally a gradient notion and can be modified in degree. This much is evident from the existence of the word unequal, for the prefix un- attaches only to gradient adjectives. We say unmanly but not unmale; and the word uneven can be applied to a surface (whose evenness may be a matter of degree) but not to a number (whose evenness is an either/or affair). • The adverb equally is generally regarded as redundant when used in combination with as. In an earlier survey, 63 percent of the Usage Panel found the following examples unacceptably redundant: Experience is equally as valuable as theory. Equally as important is the desire to learn. To eliminate the redundancy, equally should be deleted from the first example and as from the second. The solution to this usage problem usually involves using as alone when a comparison is explicit and equally alone when it is not. See Usage Notes at absolute, as1, center, perfect, unique.

The college draft was introduced in an effort to make the teams in the National Football League as equal as possible.
The candidates for the job should all be given equal consideration.
Experience is equally as valuable as theory.
Equally as important is the desire to learn.

*                     competitive  >>  "as equal as possible" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                     "same opportunity"  >>  "equal consideration" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     important  >>  "equally as valuable as theory" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     importance  >>  "Equally as important" /mGC/abE/+cp

C)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/as ,  
Usage Note:   A traditional usage rule draws a distinction between comparisons using as . . . as and comparisons using so . . . as. The rule states the so . . . as construction is required in negative sentences (as in Shakespeare's "'tis not so deep as a well"), in questions (as in Is it so bad as she says?), and in certain if- clauses (as in If it is so bad as you say, you ought to leave). But this so . . . as construction is becoming increasingly rare in American English, and the use of as . . . as is now entirely acceptable in all contexts.
• In a comparison involving both as . . . as and than, the second as should be retained in written style. One writes He is as smart as, or smarter than, his brother, not He is as smart or smarter than his brother, which is considered unacceptable in formal style.
• In many dialects, people use as in place of that in sentences like We are not sure as we want to go or It's not certain as he left. This construction is not sufficiently well established to be used in writing.
• As should be preceded by a comma when it expresses a causal relation, as in She won't be coming, as we didn't invite her. When as expresses a time relation, it is not preceded by a comma: She was finishing the painting as I walked into the room. When beginning a sentence with a clause that starts with as, one should take care that it is clear whether as is used to mean "because" or "at the same time that." The sentence As they were leaving, I walked to the door may mean either "I walked to the door because they were leaving" or "I walked to the door at the same time that they were leaving."
• As is sometimes used superfluously to introduce the complements of verbs like consider, deem, and account, as in They considered it as one of the landmark decisions of the civil rights movement. The measure was deemed as unnecessary. This usage may have arisen by analogy to regard and esteem, with which as is standardly used in this way: We regarded her as the best writer among us. But the use of as with verbs like consider is not sufficiently well established to be acceptable in writing. See Usage Notes at because, equal, like2, so1, than.
Regional Note:   American dialects often vary from Standard English in the form and usage of relative pronouns. Where Standard English has three relative pronounswho, which, and thatregional dialects, particularly those of the South and Midlands, allow as and what as relative pronouns: "Them as thinks they can whup me jest come ahead" (Publication of the American Dialect Society). The car what hit him never stopped.

"'tis not so deep as a well"
If it is so bad as you say, you ought to leave.

*                     "not as"  >>  "not so" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                     "be as"  >>  "be so" /mGC/abR

He is as smart or smarter than his brother.         (He is as smart as, or smarter than, his brother.)

*                     "smart like"  >>  "as smart or smarter than" /mGC/abE

We are not sure as we want to go.
It's not certain as he left.

*                     "We want to go"  >>  "We are not sure as we want to go" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     "He left"  >>  "It's not certain as he left" /mGC/abE/Ch

She won't be coming, as we didn't invite her.
She was finishing the painting as I walked into the room.
As they were leaving, I walked to the door.

*                     because  >>  as /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     while  >>  as /mGC/abT/+bp

They considered it as one of the landmark decisions of the civil rights movement.
The measure was deemed as unnecessary.
We regarded her as the best writer among us.

*                     it  >>  "it as" /mGC/abR

*                     deemed  >>  "deemed as" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     her  >>  "her as" /mGC/abE/+bp

Them as thinks they can whup me jest come ahead.
The car what hit him never stopped.

*  "They think they can."  >>  "Them as thinks they can whup me jest come ahead." /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*                     "that hit"  >>  "what hit" /mGC/abE

D)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/perfect ,    
Usage Note:       Some people maintain that perfect is an absolute term like chief and prime, and therefore cannot be modified by more, quite, relatively, and other qualifiers of degree.          But the qualification of perfect has many reputable precedents (most notably in the preamble to the U.S. Constitution in the phrase "in order to form a more perfect Union").         By the same token, perfect often means "ideal for the purposes,"    as in There could be no more perfect spot for the picnic,     where modification by degree makes perfect sense.       See Usage Notes at absolute, equal, unique.

"in order to form a more perfect Union"
There could be no more perfect spot for the picnic

*                     "form perfect Union"  >>  "form a more perfect Union" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     "good place"  >>  "no more perfect spot" /mGC/abE/+cp

E)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/unique ,    
Usage Note:        For many grammarians, unique is the paradigmatic absolute term,   a shibboleth that distinguishes between those who understand that such a term cannot be modified by an adverb of degree or a comparative adverb and those who do not.          These grammarians would say that a thing is either unique or not unique and that it is therefore incorrect to say that something is very unique or more unique than something else.        Most of the Usage Panel supports this traditional view.        Eighty percent disapprove of the sentence Her designs are quite unique in today's fashions.          But as the language of advertising in particular attests, unique is widely used as a synonym for worthy of being considered in a class by itself, extraordinary and if so construed it may arguably be modified.         In fact, unique appears as a modified adjective in the work of many reputable writers.         A travel writer states that "Chicago is no less unique an American city than New York or San Francisco," for example,         and the critic Fredric Jameson writes "The great modern writers have all been defined by the invention or production of rather unique styles."          Although these examples of the qualification of unique are defensible, writers should be aware that such constructions are liable to incur the censure of some readers.        See Usage Notes at absolute, equal, infinite.
USAGE:    Unique is normally taken to describe an absolute state,    i.e. one that cannot be qualified;    thus something is either unique or not unique;     it cannot be rather unique or very unique.        However unique is sometimes used informally to mean remarkable or unusual,    and this makes it possible to use comparatives or intensifiers with it, although many people object to this use.

shibboleth                              (l/S + anguage/C2)                                language

Her designs are quite unique in today's fashions.
"Chicago is no less unique an American city than New York or San Francisco,"
"The great modern writers have all been defined by the invention or production of rather unique styles."

*                      remarkable  >>  "quite unique" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                   "more beautiful"  >>  "no less unique" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*                     "their own styles"  >>  "rather unique styles" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

F)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/infinite ,    
Usage Note:      Infinite is sometimes grouped with absolute terms such as unique, absolute, and omnipotent,    since in its strict mathematical sense infiniteness is an absolute property;     some infinite sets are smaller than others,   but they are no less infinite.          In nontechnical usage, of course, infinite is often used to refer to an unimaginably large degree or amount,     and in these cases it is acceptable to modify or compare the word:        Nothing could give me more infinite pleasure than to see you win.          Withdrawing the troops would create an even more infinite set of problems for the coalition.
•Note that unlike other incomparable adjectives, infinite when used in its strict literal sense cannot be modified by words like nearly,    since quantities do not approach infinity by degrees.         This constraint, too, can be ignored when the word is used simply to refer to a very large number:      You need a nearly infinite amount of patience to do the job.      See Usage Notes at absolute, unique.

some infinite sets are smaller than others,  but they are no less infinite.
Nothing could give me more infinite pleasure than to see you win.
Withdrawing the troops would create an even more infinite set of problems for the coalition.
You need a nearly infinite amount of patience to do the job.

*                     "My children"  >>  "some infinite sets" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                     smart  >>  "no less infinite" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                     "more satisfaction"  >>  "more infinite pleasure" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                     chaos  >>  "an even more infinite set of problems" /mGC/abR

*                     much  >>  "a nearly infinite" /mGC/abT/+bp

G)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/because ,  
Usage Note:   A traditional rule holds that the construction the reason is because is redundant, and should be avoided in favor of the reason is that. The usage is well established, however, and can be justified by analogy to constructions such as His purpose in calling her was so that she would be forewarned of the change in schedule or The last time I saw her was when she was leaving for college. All three constructions are somewhat less than graceful, however.
• A favorite rule of schoolteachers (but curiously absent from the tradition of usage commentary) is that a sentence must not begin with because. Sometimes, however, because is perfectly appropriate as the opening word of a sentence, as in the beginning of one of Emily Dickinson's best-known poems: "Because I could not stop for Death --- /He kindly stopped for me." In fact, sentences beginning with because are quite common in written English.
• Another rule states that one should not use a clause beginning with because as the subject of a sentence, as in Just because he thinks it a good idea doesn't mean it's a good idea. This construction is perfectly acceptable, but it carries a colloquial flavor and may best be reserved for informal situations. See Usage Note at as1.

the reason is because ~
His purpose in calling her was so that she would be forewarned of the change in schedule.
The last time I saw her was when she was leaving for college.

*                     maybe  >>  "the reason is because" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     I  >>  "His purpose in calling her was so that she" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     Tailor  >>  "The last time I saw her was when she" /mGC/abE/+cp

>>     a sentence must not begin with because.

devil                                  (be/C2 + cause/S)                                   because

H)                                     like

   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/like ,  
Usage Note:   Writers since Chaucer's time have used like as a conjunction, but 19th-century and 20th-century critics have been so vehement in their condemnations of this usage that a writer who uses the construction in formal style risks being accused of illiteracy or worse. Prudence requires The dogs howled as (not like) we expected them to. Like is more acceptably used as a conjunction in informal style with verbs such as feel, look, seem, sound, and taste, as in It looks like we are in for a rough winter. But here too as if is to be preferred in formal writing. There can be no objection to the use of like as a conjunction when the following verb is not expressed, as in He took to politics like a duck to water. See Usage Notes at as1, together.

The dogs howled as (not like) we expected them to.
It looks like we are in for a rough winter.
He took to politics like a duck to water.

*                     when  >>  as /mGC/abE/+bp

**                    as /mGC/abE/+bp/Ch  >>  like /T

*                     "This year"  >>  "It looks like" /mGC/abE

*                     "without purpose"  >>  "like a duck to water" /mGC/abE

Our Living Language   Along with be all and go, the construction combining be and like has become a common way of introducing quotations in informal conversation, especially among younger people: "So I'm like, 'Let's get out of here!'" As with go, this use of like can also announce a brief imitation of another person's behavior, often elaborated with facial expressions and gestures. It can also summarize a past attitude or reaction (instead of presenting direct speech). If a woman says "I'm like, 'Get lost buddy!'" she may or may not have used those actual words to tell the offending man off. In fact, she may not have said anything to him but instead may be summarizing her attitude at the time by stating what she might have said, had she chosen to speak. See Notes at all, go1.

"So I'm like, 'Let's get out of here!'"
"I'm like, 'Get lost buddy!'"

*   want  >>  "am like" /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  "be like" /mGC/abE/+bp  >>  "are like" /mGC/abE  >>  "is like" /mGC/abE/Ch

*                     coffee  >>  "Get lost buddy" /mGC/abE/+bp

Our Living Language   In certain Southern varieties of American English there are two grammatically distinct usages of the word like to mean "was on the verge of." In both, either like or liked is possible. In the first, the word is followed by a past infinitive: We liked (or like) to have drowned. The ancestor of this construction was probably the adjective like in the sense "likely, on the verge of," as in She's like to get married again. The adjective was reinterpreted by some speakers as a verb, and since like to and liked to are indistinguishable in normal speech, the past tense came to be marked on the following infinitive for clarity. From this developed a second way of expressing the same concept: the use of like to with a following finite past-tense verb form, as in I like to died when I saw that. This construction appears odd at first because it ostensibly contains an ungrammatical infinitive to died; but that is not the case at all. What has happened is that like to here has been reinterpreted as an adverb meaning almost. In fact, it is quite common to see the phrase spelled as a single word, in the pronunciation spelling liketa.

We liked (or like) to have drowned.
She's like to get married again.
I like to died when I saw that.

***   "like to" >> liketa /mGC/abR >> "liked to" /mGC/abE >> "is like to" /mGC/abR/+bp >> "be like to" /mGC/abR/+cp >> "am like to" /mGC/abR/+bp/Ch >> "are like to" /mGC/abR/+cp/Ch

*             "like to"  >>  (keenly /P)/C1  >>  (dearly /T)/C1  >>  (almost /S)/C1

"like to"                                    (k/P + eenly/C1)                                  keenly
"like to"                                    (d/T + early/C1)                                   dearly
"like to"                                ([ŋ=  w=]/S + almost/C1)                           almost

Usage:   The use of like to mean such as was formerly thought to be undesirable in formal writing, but has now become acceptable. It was also thought that as rather than like should be used to mean in the same way that, but now both as and like are acceptable: they hunt and catch fish as/like their ancestors used to. The use of look like and seem like before a clause, although very common, is thought by many people to be incorrect or non-standard: it looks as though he won't come (not it looks like he won't come)

they hunt and catch fish as/like their ancestors used to.
it looks as though he won't come (not it looks like he won't come)

***                         "use to"  >>  "used to" /mGC/abE/+cp

*           "use to"  >>  (habitually /P)/C1  >>  (conventionally /T)/C1  >>  (cheerfully /S)/C1

*                     "as before"  >>  "like their ancestors used to" /mGC/abE

*                       probably  >>  "it looks like" /mGC/abE/+bp

I)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/together ,  
Usage Note:   Together with is often used following the subject of a sentence or clause to introduce an addition. The addition, however, does not alter the number of the verb, which is governed by the subject: The king (singular), together with two aides, is expected soon. The same is true of along with, besides, and in addition to. See Usage Notes at besides, like2.

The king, together with two aides, is expected soon.

*      "The king will appear."  >>  "The king, together with two aides, is expected soon." /mGC/abE/+cp

J)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/besides ,  
Usage Note:   Some critics argue that beside and besides should be kept distinct when they are used as prepositions. According to that argument, beside is used only to mean "at the side of," as in There was no one in the seat beside me. For the meanings "in addition to" and "except for" besides should be used: Besides replacing the back stairs, she fixed the broken banister. No one besides Smitty would say a thing like that. But this distinction is often ignored, even by widely respected writers. While it is true that besides can never mean "at the side of," beside regularly appears in print in place of besides. Using beside in this way can be ambiguous, however; the sentence There was no one beside him at the table could mean that he had the table to himself or that the seats next to him were not occupied. See Usage Note at together.

*                       beside  >>  besides /mGC/abE/+cp

There was no one in the seat beside me.
Besides replacing the back stairs, she fixed the broken banister.
No one besides Smitty would say a thing like that.
There was no one beside him at the table.

*                       "except me"  >>  "beside me" /mGC/abE/Ch

*              "As well as the back stairs"  >>  "Besides replacing the back stairs" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                       carelessly  >>  "besides Smitty" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                       none  >>  "no one beside him" /mGC/abE/+cp


beside                                (n/C2 + eighbouring/T)                          neighbouring

besides                     ([ŋ=  w=]/P + "over and above"/T)                   "over and above"
besides                               (w/P + "-hat's more"/T)                        "what's more"


*           "in addition to"  >>  ("over and above" /T)/P
*                      and  >>  ("what's more" /T)/P

   http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/what's+more ,  
what's more
the next fact is at least as important or even more important   Military action will hurt ordinary people, and what's more, it won't solve the problem.

*                     "what's more"  >>  "and what's more" /mGC/abE

*               "and what's more" /mGC/abE  >>  "what is more" /C2/Ch

K)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/all ,  
Usage Note:   The construction all that is used informally in questions and negative sentences to mean "to the degree expected." In the late 1960s, the Usage Panel rejected its use, but evidently resistance to all that is crumbling. Seventy-two percent of the Panel now finds the construction acceptable in the sentence The movie is not all that interesting.
• Sentences of the form All X's are not Y may be ambiguous. All of the departments did not file a report may mean that some departments did not file, or that none did. The first meaning can be expressed unambiguously by the sentence Not all of the departments filed a report. The second meaning requires a paraphrase such as None of the departments filed a report or All of the departments failed to file a report. The same problem can arise with other universal terms such as every in negated sentences, as in the ambiguous Every department did not file a report. See Usage Note at every.

The movie is not all that interesting.

*                       very  >>  "not all that" /mGC/abR/+bp

All X's are not Y.
All of the departments did not file a report.            (Not all of the departments filed a report.)
(None of the departments filed a report or All of the departments failed to file a report.)
Every department did not file a report.

*                       "X is not Y"  >>  "All X's are not Y" /mGC/abE/+bp

*      "The department did not file a report"  >>  "All of the departments did not file a report" /mGC/abE/+cp

*         "The department did not file a report"  >>  "Every department did not file a report" /mGC/abE/+bp

Our Living Language   Among the newest ways of introducing direct speech in the United States is the construction consisting of a form of be with all, as in I'm all, "I'm not gonna do that!" And she's all, "Yes you are!" This construction is particularly common in the animated speech of young people in California and elsewhere on the West Coast, who use it more frequently than the informal East Coast alternatives, be like and go, as in He's like (or goes), "I'm not gonna do that!" These indicators of direct speech tend to be used more often with pronoun subjects (He's all, "I'm not....") than with nouns (The man's all, "I'm not...."), and with the historical present (He's all....) than with the past (He was all....). All of these locutions can introduce a gesture or facial expression rather than a quotation, as in He's all.... followed by a shrug of the shoulders. Be all and be like can also preface a statement that sums up an attitude, as in "I'm all 'No way!'" See Notes at go1, like2.

I'm all, "I'm not gonna do that!"
And she's all, "Yes you are!"
He's like (or goes), "I'm not gonna do that!"
He's all.... followed by a shrug of the shoulders.
I'm all 'No way!'

*                       "I said"  >>  "I'm all" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                       "She said"  >>  "And she's all" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                     "He said"  >>  "He's like" /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  "He goes" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                       "He is silent"  >>  "He's all" /mGC/abT/+bp

L)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/go ,  
Our Living Language   Go has long been used to describe the production of nonlinguistic noises, notably in conversation with children, as in The train went "toot." The cow goes "moo." In recent years, however, many speakers have begun to use go in informal conversation to report speech, as in Then he goes, "You think you're real smart, don't you?" This usage parallels the quotation introducers be all and be like. But unlike these other expressions, which can indicate thoughts or attitudes, the quotational use of go is largely restricted to dialogue related in the narrative present, especially when the narrator wishes to mimic the accent or intonation of the original speaker. See Notes at all, like2.

The train went "toot."
The cow goes "moo."
Then he goes, "You think you're real smart, don't you?"

*                       "It sounds"  >>  "The train went" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                       "It sounded"  >>  "The cow goes" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                       "He said"  >>  "Then he goes" /mGC/abR/Ch

M)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/than ,  
Usage Note:   Since the 18th century grammarians have insisted that than should be regarded as a conjunction in all its uses, so that a sentence such as Bill is taller than Tom should be construed as an elliptical version of the sentence Bill is taller than Tom is. According to this view, the case of a pronoun following than is determined by whether the pronoun serves as the subject or object of the verb that is "understood." Thus, the standard rule requires Pat is taller than I (not me) on the assumption that this sentence is elliptical for Pat is taller than I am but allows The news surprised Pat more than me, since this sentence is taken as elliptical for The news surprised Pat more than it surprised me. However, than is quite commonly treated as a preposition when followed by an isolated noun phrase, and as such occurs with a pronoun in the objective case: John is taller than me. Though this usage is still widely regarded as incorrect, it is predominant in speech and has reputable literary precedent, appearing in the writing of such respected authors as Shakespeare, Johnson, Swift, Scott, and Faulkner. It is also consistent with the fact that than is clearly treated as a preposition in the than whom construction, as in a poet than whom (not than who) no one has a dearer place in the hearts of his countrymen. Still, the writer who risks a sentence like Mary is taller than him in formal writing must be prepared to defend the usage against objections of critics who are unlikely to be dissuaded from the conviction that the usage is incorrect. • Comparatives using as . . . as can be analyzed as parallel to those using than. Traditional grammarians insist that I am not as tall as he is the only correct form; in formal writing, one should adhere to this rule. However, one can cite both literary precedent and syntactic arguments in favor of analyzing the second as as a preposition (which would allow constructions such as I am not as tall as him). See Usage Note at as1.
Usage: In formal English, than is usually regarded as a conjunction governing an unexpressed verb: he does it far better than I (do). The case of any pronoun therefore depends on whether it is the subject or object of the unexpressed verb: she likes him more than I (like him); she likes him more than (she likes) me. However in ordinary speech and writing than is usually treated as a preposition and is followed by the object form of a pronoun: my brother is younger than me

Bill is taller than Tom.                 (Bill is taller than Tom is.)
Pat is taller than I (not me).                (Pat is taller than I am.)
The news surprised Pat more than me.            The news surprised Pat more than it surprised me.)
John is taller than me.
"a poet than whom (not than who) no one has a dearer place in the hearts of his countrymen"
Mary is taller than him.
I am not as tall as he is.

he does it far better than I (do).
she likes him more than I (like him);             she likes him more than (she likes) me.
my brother is younger than me

*                       "as tall as"  >>  "taller than" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                               tall  >>  "taller than I" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                       "very much"  >>  "more than me" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                            careful  >>  "taller than me" /mGC/abE/Ch

*  gentleman  >>  "a poet than whom no one has a dearer place in the hearts of his countrymen" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                         beautiful  >>  "taller than him" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                          "a liar"  >>  "as tall as he is" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*                         exercise  >>  "it far better than I" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                            dance  >>  "him more than I" /mGC/abR

Re:   Article of  "'Λu=, =Λu, Λuo, oΛu'    cushy, good/well, anyplace/etc. presently, easy/easily,    prep/4,  'than: prep?' "   <<Column 9.  English prepositions/4  E)  than>>

   http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/than[2] ,  
usage          After 200 years of innocent if occasional use,    the preposition than was called into question by 18th century grammarians.           Some 200 years of elaborate reasoning have led to these present-day inconsistent conclusions:           than whom is standard but clumsy <T. S. Eliot, than whom nobody could have been more insularly English — Anthony Burgess>;        than me may be acceptable in speech      <a man no mightier than thyself or me — Shakespeare>        <why should a man be better than me because he's richer than me — William Faulkner, in a talk to students>;        than followed by a third-person objective pronoun (her, him, them) is usually frowned upon.          Surveyed opinion tends to agree with these conclusions.          Our evidence shows that than is used as a conjunction more commonly than as a preposition,    that than whom is chiefly limited to writing, and that me is more common after the preposition than the third-person objective pronouns.      In short, you can use than either as a conjunction or as a preposition.

T. S. Eliot, than whom nobody could have been more insularly English
a man no mightier than thyself or me
why should a man be better than me because he's richer than me

*  patriot  >>  "T. S. Eliot, than whom nobody could have been more insularly English" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                excellency  >>  "a man no mightier than thyself or me" /mGC/abE/+bp

   http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_/than.html ,      
Word Usage
than he or than him?
Because than is a preposition as well as a conjunction, either construction is possible, as is the fuller form than he is.         The form than him is common in conversation and other spoken contexts (We're older than him) but is still frowned upon in formal writing where We're older than he is is preferred.

We're older than he is,

*                       him  >>  "he is" /mGC/abE/+cp

N)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/so ,    
Usage Note:   Many critics and grammarians have insisted that so must be followed by that in formal writing when used to introduce a clause giving the reason for or purpose of an action: He stayed so that he could see the second feature. But since many respected writers use so for so that in formal writing, it seems best to consider the issue one of stylistic preference: The store stays open late so (or so that) people who work all day can buy groceries.
• Both so and so that are acceptably used to introduce clauses that state a result or consequence: The Bay Bridge was still closed, so (or so that) the drive from San Francisco to the Berkeley campus took an hour and a half.
• So is frequently used in informal speech to string together the elements of a narrative. In most cases, this practice should not be carried over into formal writing, where readers need connections to be made more explicit.
• Critics have sometimes objected to the use of so as an intensive meaning "to a great degree or extent," as in We were so relieved to learn that the deadline had been extended. This usage is most common in informal contexts, perhaps because, unlike the neutral very, it presumes that the listener or reader will be sympathetic to the speaker's evaluation of the situation. Thus one would be more apt to say It was so unfair of them not to invite you than to say It was so fortunate that I didn't have to put up with your company. For just this reason, the construction may occasionally be used to good effect in more formal contexts to invite the reader to take the point of view of the speaker or subject: The request seemed to her to be quite reasonable; it was so unfair of the manager to refuse. See Usage Note at as1.

He stayed so that he could see the second feature.
The store stays open late so (or so that) people who work all day can buy groceries.
The Bay Bridge was still closed, so (or so that) the drive from San Francisco to the Berkeley campus took an hour and a half.
We were so relieved to learn that the deadline had been extended.
It was so unfair of them not to invite you.   (It was so fortunate that I didn't have to put up with your company.)
The request seemed to her to be quite reasonable; it was so unfair of the manager to refuse.

*                       and/+bp  >>  "so that" /mGC/abR/Ch   >>  so /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*                        very/+cp   >>  so /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*               "that they did not invite you"  >>  "of them not to invite you" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                             very  >>  quite /mGC/abR/Ch

*               "that the manager refused it"  >>  "of the manager to refuse" /mGC/abT/Ch

Regional Note:    New England speakers often use a negative form such as so didn't where other varieties would use the positive so did, as in Sophie ate all her strawberries and so didn't Amelia. Since this usage may confuse a speaker who has not previously encountered it, it is best avoided in writing.
Usage:   In formal English, so is not used as a conjunction, to indicate either purpose (he left by a back door so he could avoid photographers) or result (the project was abandoned so his services were no longer needed). In the former case to or in order to should be used instead, and in the latter case and so or and therefore would be more acceptable. The expression so therefore should not be used

Sophie ate all her strawberries and so didn't Amelia.
he left by a back door so he could avoid photographers.
the project was abandoned so his services were no longer needed.

*                        completely  >>  "and so didn't Amelia" /mGC/abE/+bp

he left by a back door to avoid photographers
he left by a back door in order to avoid photographers
the project was abandoned and so his services were no longer needed.
the project was abandoned and therefore his services were no longer needed.
the project was abandoned so therefore his services were no longer needed.

*           "while wanting to"  >>  to [t=] /mGC/abR/+bp/Ch  >>  "wanting to" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                        to [t=] /mGC/abR/+bp  >>  "in order to" /mGC/abE/+bp

*               "wanting to" /mGC/abE/+bp/Ch  >>  "in order to" /mGC/abE/+bp

*               and/+bp  >>  "and so" /mGC/abT/+bp  >>  "and therefore" /mGC/abT/+bp/Ch

**                        "and therefore" /mGC/abT/+bp  >>  "so therefore" /T/Ch

O)
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/center ,  
Usage Note:   Traditionally, the verb center may be freely used with the prepositions on, upon, in, or at; but some language critics have denounced its use with around as illogical or physically impossible. But the fact that writers persist in using this phrase in sentences such as The discussion centered around the need for curriculum reform, a sentence that 71 percent of the Usage Panel accepts, suggests that many people perceive center around to best represent the true nature of what they are trying to say. Indeed, in an example like A storm of controversy centered around the king, the only appropriate choice seems to be around. Still, if one wishes to avoid the phrase center around, the phrase revolve around is available as an option. Since center can represent various relations involving having, finding, or turning about a center, the choice of a preposition depends on what is intended. There is ample evidence for usages with each preposition listed above. The Panel accepts all of these uses except the one with at. Seventy-seven percent reject the sentence The company has been centered at Atlanta for the last five years. See Usage Note at equal.

The discussion centered around the need for curriculum reform.
A storm of controversy centered around the king.
The company has been centered at Atlanta for the last five years.

*                        touched/+bp   >>  "centered around" /mGC/abE/+bp
*                        mentioned/+cp   >>  "centered around" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                        touch/+bp   >>  "center around" /mGC/abT/+bp
*                        mention/+cp  >>  "center around" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                        touches/+bp   >>  "centers around" /mGC/abR
*                        mentions/+cp   >>  "centers around" /mGC/abR

*                        touching/+bp   >>  "centering around" /mGC/abR/Ch
*                        mentioning/+cp   >>  "centering around" /mGC/abR/Ch

v.tr.
1. To place in or at the center: centered the vase on the table.
2. To direct toward a center or central point; concentrate or focus: tried to center the discussion on the main issues.
3. Sports
a. To pass (a ball or puck) toward the center of a playing area.
b. To play as a center on (a line), as in ice hockey.
4. Football To pass (the ball) back between the legs to begin a down.
v.intr.
1. To be concentrated; cluster: The epidemic centered in the urban areas.
2. To have a central theme or concern; be focused: Her novels center on the problems of adolescence.
3. Sports To play as a center.

*                        put/+bp  >>  pointed/+cp  >>  centered /mGC/abT/Ch
*                        put/+bp  >>  point/+cp  >>  center /mGC/abT
*                        puts/+bp  >>  points/+cp  >>  centers /mGC/abR
*                        putting/+bp  >>  pointing/+cp  >>  centering /mGE/+cp

center                                     (d/T + istribute/C1)                             distribute

center                             (pl/T + "-ay center on"/C1)                      "play center on"

center                              (b/T + "-e centered"/C1)                          "be centered"

center                               (pl/T + "-ay middle"/C1)                          "play middle"



55.                                 run
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/run ,  
Regional Note:   Terms for "a small, fast-flowing stream" vary throughout the eastern United States especially. Speakers in the eastern part of the Lower North (including Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, and southern Pennsylvania) use the word run. Speakers in the Hudson Valley and Catskills, the Dutch settlement areas of New York State, may call such a stream a kill. Brook has come to be used throughout the Northeast. Southerners refer to a branch, and throughout the northern United States the term is crick, a variant of creek.

run                                       (t/P + orrent/C2)                                   torrent

*                             torrent  >>  kill /mGC/abT/Ch

*                             run  >>  brook /mGC/abT/+bp

*                             torrent  >>  branch /mGC/abE/+bp

*                            branch /mGC/abE/+bp/Ch  >>  crick /mGC/abT/+bp

*                            crick /mGC/abT/+bp/Ch  >>  creek /mGC/abE/+cp



56.            "be able to"
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ably ,  
Usage Note:   The construction able to takes an infinitive to show the subject's ability to accomplish an action: We were able to get a grant for the project. The new submarine is able to dive twice as fast as the older model. Some people think it should be avoided when the subject does not have an ability, as in sentences with passive constructions involving forms of the verb be: The problem was able to be solved by using a new lab technique. The reasoning here is that since the problem has no ability to accomplish an action, it is not able to do anything, and therefore able to should not be used. Presumably this ban would apply to similar words like capable and to negative words like unable and incapable. In such cases one can usually avoid the problem by using can or could: The problem could be solved.... Keep in mind, however, that passives with get ascribe a more active role to their subjects, and here one can use able to: He was able to get accepted by a top law school.


*             "be able to"  >>  ("without difficulty" /P)/C1  >>  (well /T)/C1  >>  (can /S)/C1


We were able to get a grant for the project.
The new submarine is able to dive twice as fast as the older model.
The problem was able to be solved by using a new lab technique.
The problem could be solved.
He was able to get accepted by a top law school.

*                    "No problem"  >>  "The problem could be solved" /mGC/abR

*                    passed  >>  "was able to get accepted by" /mGC/abE



57.                            hardly/scarcely/barely
   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/hardly ,  
Usage Note:         In Standard English, hardly, scarcely, and similar adverbs cannot be used with a negative.        The sentence   I couldn't hardly see him,   for instance, is not acceptable.         This violation of the double negative rule is curious  because these adverbs are not truly negative in meaning.       The sentence Mary hardly laughed means that Mary did laugh a little,   not that she kept from laughing altogether,    and therefore does not express a negative proposition.          But adverbs like hardly and scarcely do share some important features of negative adverbs,     even though they may not have purely negative meaning.          For one thing, they combine with any and at all,  which are characteristically associated with negative contexts.          Thus we say I hardly saw him at all      or I never saw him at all     but not I occasionally saw him at all.          Similarly, we say I hardly had any time    or I didn't have any time   but not I had any time and so on.          Like other negative adverbs, hardly triggers inversion of the subject and auxiliary verb when it begins a sentence.         Thus we say   Hardly had I arrived when she left    on the pattern of Never have I read such a book     or At no time has he condemned the movement.            Other adverbs do not cause this kind of inversion. We would not say   Occasionally has he addressed this question   or To a slight degree have they changed their position.        The fact is that adverbs such as hardly can be said to have a negative meaning in that they minimize the state or event they describe.         Thus hardly means "almost not at all";     rarely means "practically never"; and so forth.          This is why they cannot be used with another negative such as not or none.           See Usage Notes at double negative, rarely, scarcely.

USAGE:         Since hardly, scarcely, and barely already have negative force,     it is redundant to use another negative in the same clause:        he had hardly had (not he hadn't hardly had) time to think;      there was scarcely any (not scarcely no) bread left.


*                    "in probability"  >>  hardly /mGC/abR/Ch

hardly                         (w/T + "-ith difficulty"/C1)/Ch                        "with difficulty"
hardly                         ([ŋ=  y=]/T + "only just"/C1)/Ch                        "only just"
hardly                             (n/T + "-ot at all"/C1)/Ch                            "not at all"

I couldn't hardly see him.
Mary hardly laughed.           (Mary did laugh a little)
I hardly saw him at all.
I never saw him at all.             (I occasionally saw him at all.)
I hardly had any time.
I didn't have any time.             (I had any time)
Hardly had I arrived when she left.
Never have I read such a book.
At no time has he condemned the movement.
he had hardly had (not he hadn't hardly had) time to think.
there was scarcely any (not scarcely no) bread left.

*                    "I met him"  >>  "I couldn't hardly see him" /mGC/abR/+bp

*   "Mary laughed"  >>  "Mary hardly laughed" /mGC/abT/Ch  >>  "Mary did laugh a little" /mGC/abE/+cp

*  "I often see him"  >>  "I hardly saw him at all" /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  "I never saw him at all" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                    "Frequently I met him"  >>  "I occasionally saw him at all" /mGC/abE/+cp

*    "I am busy"  >>  "I hardly had any time" /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  "I didn't have any time" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                    "I am busy now"  >>  "I had any time" /mGC/abE/+bp

*                  "I just arrived"  >>  "Hardly had I arrived when she left" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                    "I read the book"  >>  "Never have I read such a book" /mGC/abR/+bp

*           "I agree with you"  >>  "At no time has he condemned the movement" /mGC/abT/Ch

*                    "I am not busy"  >>  "he had hardly had time to think" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                 "I am not so busy"  >>  "he hadn't hardly had time to think" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*              "We have plenty of bread"  >>  "there was scarcely any bread left" /mGC/abR/+bp

*                   "We don't have bread"  >>  "there was scarcely no bread left" /mGC/abE/+cp

   http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_/hardly.html ,    
Word Usage
Hardly,  like barely and scarcely,  has a negative force,  rendering unnecessary the use of another negative in the clause or sentence:   I can [not can't] hardly see you.      Note that when and not than is used in any continuation of the sentence:      Hardly [or barely or scarcely] had I begun to speak when [not than] she interrupted me.      (After no sooner, however, than is correct.    No sooner had I begun to speak than [not when] she interrupted me.)        Hardly is limited to these special uses;      the usual adverb from the adjective hard is also hard:      They are all working hard to get ready for their exams.

I can [not can't] hardly see you.
Hardly [or barely or scarcely] had I begun to speak when [not than] she interrupted me.
No sooner had I begun to speak than [not when] she interrupted me.
They are all working hard to get ready for their exams.

*                           "I see you"  >>  "I can hardly see you" /mGC/abE/+cp

**                          can /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  can't /T

*  "she interrupted me" >> "Hardly had I begun to speak when she interrupted me" /mGC/abE/+cp >> "Barely had I begun to speak when she interrupted me" /mGC/abE/+bp >> "Scarcely had I begun to speak when she interrupted me" /mGC/abE/Ch

**                     when /mGC/abE/+bp  >>  than/ C2
**                     when /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  than/ C2
**                     when /mGC/abE/Ch  >>  than/ C2

*   "she interrupted me"  >>  "No sooner had I begun to speak than she interrupted me" /mGC/abT/+bp/Ch

**                           than /mGC/abT/+bp/Ch  >>  when /S

hardly                         (w/T + "-ith difficulty"/C1)/Ch                        "with difficulty"

*                                    hardly  >>  hard /mGC/abR

   http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hardly ,    
4 a—used to emphasize a minimal amount   <I hardly knew her>   <almost new — hardly a scratch on it>        b—used to soften a negative    <you can't hardly tell who anyone is — G. B. Shaw>
5: certainly not     <that news is hardly surprising>
usage        Hardly in sense 5 is used sometimes with not for emphasis    <just another day at the office? Not hardly>.       In sense 4b with a negative verb (as can't, wouldn't, didn't) it does not make a double negative but softens the negative.           In “you can't hardly find a red one,”    the sense is that you can find a red one, but only with difficulty;      in “you can't find a red one,”  the sense is that red ones are simply not available.         Use of hardly with a negative verb is a speech form;     it is most commonly heard in Southern and Midland speech areas.      In other speech areas and in all discursive prose,   hardly is normally used with a positive   <you can hardly find a red one>.

I hardly knew her
hardly a scratch on it
you can't hardly tell who anyone is      (you can't hardly find a red one)  (you can't find a red one)  <you can hardly find a red one>
that news is hardly surprising           (just another day at the office? Not hardly)

*                      "I don't know her"  >>  "I hardly knew her" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                             scratch  >>  "hardly a scratch on it" /mGC/abE/+cp

*                                not  >>  "~'t hardly" /mGC/abT/+bp

*                           "Never mind"  >>  "Not hardly" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

   http://www.thefreedictionary.com/scarcely ,    
Usage Note:         Because scarcely has the force of a negative,   its use with another negative,    as in I couldn't scarcely believe it,   is regarded as incorrect.          • A clause following scarcely is correctly introduced by when or before;    the use of than, though common, is still unacceptable to some grammarians:     The meeting had scarcely begun when (or before but not than) it was interrupted.          See Usage Notes at double negative, hardly.

USAGE         Since scarcely, hardly, and barely already have negative force,   it is unnecessary to use another negative word with them.        Therefore, say he had hardly had time to think   (not he hadn't hardly had time to think);       and there was scarcely any bread left   (not there was scarcely no bread left).            When scarcely, hardly, and barely are used at the beginning of a sentence, as in scarcely had I arrived, the following clause should start with when: scarcely had I arrived when I was asked to chair a meeting.          The word before can be used in place of when in this context, but the word than used in the same way is considered incorrect by many people, though this use is becoming increasingly common.

I couldn't scarcely believe it.
The meeting had scarcely begun when (or before but not than) it was interrupted.
scarcely had I arrived when I was asked to chair a meeting.

*                     "I believe it"  >>  "I couldn't scarcely believe it" /mGC/abE/+cp/Ch

*  "The meeting was interrupted." >> "The meeting had scarcely begun when it was interrupted." /mGC/abE/+bp >> "The meeting had scarcely begun before it was interrupted." /mGC/abE/+cp

*                  when /mGC/abE/+bp  >>  than /C2
*                  before /mGC/abE/+cp  >>  than /C2

*  "I was asked to chair a meeting"  >>  "scarcely had I arrived when I was asked to chair a meeting" /mGC/abT/+bp/Ch


*                    "with difficulty"  >>  scarcely /mGC/abE/+bp

*                     scarcely /mGC/abE/+bp/Ch  >>  scarce /T

scarcely                       ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "almost not"/C1)/Ch                     "almost not"

scarcely                        ("by n"/T + "-o means"/C1)/Ch                      "by no means"

scarcely                  ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "once in a blue moon"/C1)/Ch                 "once in a blue moon"


*                         "not easily"  >>  barely /mGC/abE/Ch

barely                         ([ŋ=  w=]/T + "at a push"/C1)/Ch                       "at a push"



58.                                       yoga/ballet,             M&M


alcohol                                (w/GC/S/abT + ine/S)                                   wine

*                              alcohol  >>  (liquor /GC/S/abT)/C1


jeopardy                                      (q/T + uiz/S)                                     quiz


capitalism                                (d/P + emocracy/C1)                           democracy

communism                              (d/P + emocracy/C2)                           democracy

socialism                               (d/P + emocracy/C2)/Ch                         democracy

*                           communism  >>  (anarchism /GC/S/abT)/S

*                           communism  >>  ("Libertarian socialism" /T/Ch)/P

*                           communism  >>  ("Democratic socialism" /T)/P

*                             capitalism  >>  ("Social democracy" /S)/C2

*                            democracy  >>  (Syndicalism /P)/C1

**                                  city  >>  (democracy /T/Ch)/P

city                                      (p/T + eople/P)                                     people

citizen                                (city/GC/S/abT + s/C1)                             citys/cities


*                        elephant  >>  (mammoth /C2)/GC/S/abT


*                 progressive/GC/S/abT  <<  activist/C2

*                conservative/GC/S/abT  <<  royalist/C2


*  ("a-activist" /C2/+-/MS/abE)/abD >> partisan(자기편) /GC/P/abT/Ch (militant/C2, crusader/P, (reformer/P)/C1, (reformist/P/Ch)/C1) >> partizan(지지자) /GC/P/abT (meliorist/C2/Ch, "social reformer"/C1)
*  ("the-activist" /C2/+-/MS/abE)/abThr >> warrior(정계의 투사) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> organizer(조직자) /GC/P/abT

*  ("a-royalist" /C2/+-/MS/abE)/abD >> monarchist(군주론자) /GC/P/abT/Ch (Orleanist /T) >> cavalier(왕당원) /GC/P/abT (fascist /S)
*  ("the-royalist" /C2/+-/MS/abE)/abThr >> "right-winger"(우익 당원) /GC/P/abT/Ch >> rightist(우파의 사람) /GC/P/abT (Tory /T/Ch)


**                   progressive/GC/S/abT  << liberal/C1, adj.

liberal/noun                             (pr/P + ogressive/C2)                           progressive


*                  liberal  >>  (libertarian /C2)/GC/S/abT

innovator                         (l/GC/S/abT + ibertarian/S)/Ch                         libertarian


*                  innovator  >>  (progressivist /GC/S/abT)/P  >>  (progressist /GC/S/abT/Ch)/P

*                   (progressist /GC/S/abT)/P  >>  progressionist/C1


traditionalist                      (c/C1 + onservative/GC/S/abT)/Ch                   conservative


moderate                            (c/T + onservative/C2)                            conservative

reactionary                       (c/GC/S/abT + onservative/C2)                       conservative

die-hard                        (c/GC/S/abT + onservative/C2)/Ch                     conservative

"middle-of-the-roader"                         (d/C2 + -ie-hard/T)                         die-hard

"stick-in-the-mud"                        (d/C2 + -ie-hard/GC/S/abT)                      die-hard


**                  yoga  >>  (ballet /P)/S

*                   (ballet /P/Ch)/S  >>  ("figure skating" /P)/GC/S/abT


>>   M&M's History: How did they (and other brands) get their names?
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%26M%27s ,  

M&M                               (c/GC/S/abT + hocolate/T)                             chocolate

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DATE: 2012.02.13 - 13:11


 Prev message slave/Slav,    'Black History Month'    bidet/shampoo/doomsday,   'six pack abs'    birdie/par,     Sparta/Athens
 Next message acquiesce, check, get, numb, coward, amount, principal, couple, husband, pair, set,  (ad)dress,  'call oneself'
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596Simple view***   NOTICE (공지) :   member registration (sign in) for LOGIN,        (LOGIN을 위한 회원 가입) Y... 2013.01.04
595Simple view                         January/Janus,                  February/March/April/May/June/July Y... 2012.10.14
594Simple view   European Union (EU),            Quantum field theory (QFT),       spacetime,      relativity,         Einstein Y... 2012.10.14
593Simple viewGPCR,    'quantum mechanics'     'quantum state'     'subatomic particle'     quark,   photon,     'quantum optics' Y... 2012.10.12
592Simple viewParkinson's disease,      Nobel Prize,    TNT,     quantum,    'quantum computer'    'quantum electronics'     laser Y... 2012.10.11
591Simple viewInfluenza viruses,   bubonic plague,   Lou Gehrig’s disease,    visa,   Dracula,    DNA/RNA,    stem cell,   iPS cell Y... 2012.10.09
590Simple viewHarvest moon,  Thanksgiving Day,  Oktoberfest,          bacteria/virus/norovirus/vaccine/cancer/genome/rotavirus Y... 2012.10.03
589Simple viewplanet/Earth/Mars/Venus/Uranus/Neptune/Mercury/Jupiter/Pluto/Saturn,      El Niño,  La Niña,     Global warming Y... 2012.10.01
588Simple viewSARS,     Antibiotic,     SAT,       Medicare/Medicaid,       Salmonella,       Alzheimer,       autism,       Moon River Y... 2012.09.27
587Simple view'US dollar'   'US coins'   'State Quarters'      'Seal of the United States'   'E pluribus unum'     Canada, South Africa Y... 2012.09.24
586Simple view'Stay Away From Seattle Day'   nanny, HIV/AIDS,   superbug,  'avian flu', Tamiflu,  GMO,   'National Singles Week' Y... 2012.09.20
585Simple viewrather/quick/question/laconic/scan/boycott/outlaw/amount/fee, precipitate, bless,/regretful/formidable/automatic Y... 2012.09.16
584Simple viewcomplete, fey, damned, important, saving, elder, blatant, tsar, humor, chortle, exist, assure, net, complex, empty Y... 2012.09.16
583Simple view'iuΛ*a//o/='          sex, torturous/tortuous, reaction, accessory, complement/compliment, boast, advance, occur Y... 2012.09.16
582Simple view>>                                        Vowel chart                        (& glossary) Y... 2012.09.16
581Simple view'negative prefix/suffix'       'Labor Day'             'Capital cities' (Washington DC)     'capitals in USA'         WSPD Y... 2012.09.09
580Simple view'Gabrielle Dee 'Gabby' Giffords'       'Assassination of John F. Kennedy'       'schwa ∂ (Λ)'     'be' - inflection,      lingerie Y... 2012.08.28
579Simple view'Phonetics between West/East astrology'                  'Why gold/silver/bronze medal?'                   'why left-handed??' Y... 2012.08.14
578Simple view>>                                        other left-handed celebrities Y... 2013.08.14
577Simple viewColo. James Eagen Holmes   <bad name>          “The Dark Knight Rises.”            Batman,                  Schizophrenia Y... 2012.08.01
576Simple viewPeter Higgs, <Higgs boson>              Korea, 한국 [han gug], 韓國 or 瀚國 ??             swastika; Why Buddhist symbol?? Y... 2012.07.22
575Simple viewJapan/China/Vietnam/Thai-/Cambodia/Laos/Burma/Malaysia/Indonesia/Brunei/Singapore/Philippines/Taiwan/Okinawa Y... 2012.07.12
574Simple view         Who/how made English/German/French spellings??               'Indo-European'       Aryan Y... 2012.07.03
573Simple viewso-called,   self-styled,   various,  different,   practically,   service,  nest,     alternative/alternate,     otherwise/other Y... 2012.07.02
572Simple viewsmart,  rarely,  only,  reduction,  group,  'can't help but',  suffer,  evoke,  careen,  able,  just,  fair/fairly,  good/well Y... 2012.07.02
571Simple viewhubbub, prison, dungeon, situation, belfry, dinner, banquet, loaf, dress, require, prefer/preferable, raid, same, bad Y... 2012.06.29
570Simple viewdoubt, quiz, fire, challenged, mutual, crucial, moot, firstly, right, worry, race, vogue, 'look to', revolution, need/must Y... 2012.06.26
569Simple view'oui*aΛ='    data, dope, comptroller, regard, valediction, hassle, obviate, eliminate, harass, scold, rap, 'riot act' Y... 2012.06.26
568Simple viewstem cell,    snafu/Supermoon/derby,     Luzon Sea, South China Sea,     Financial Derivatives,        Big Ben,        K2 Y... 2012.06.12
567Simple view          common/same  (phonetic) structure  in  Korean,  Chinese,  Japanese  &  English  alphabets/characters Y... 2012.05.31
566Simple view>>  Corrected                               "J *(Y/Ch),  Q *(Z/Ch)  &  X *(S/Ch)", English Y... 2013.02.21
565Simple viewgrieve/speed/fact/lingo,     Amish,     Scarborough/Panatag Shoal,      Parece Vela, (沖ノ鳥島), 冲鸟礁, Okinotorishima Y... 2012.05.04
564Simple view'uio*a/Λ/='    wish/series/fellow/item/period,   be/strike, affect/effect, dare,   very/dig/theme/fun/gambit/discomfit Y... 2012.05.04
563Simple viewPAC,   individual,         동해東海/일본해日本海/한국해韓國海,         and/or,    fraud,    'hedge fund',   'hall of fame',   arse Y... 2012.04.15
562Simple viewtemple/fiction/legend/status/group/impeach/lay/set/emotional,    percent(age), sack/fire,      'modal aux.'  dilemma Y... 2012.04.06
561Simple view'=ui*a/Λ/o'    ketchup/pickle/advise/holler,  'powerful/mighty, metathesis'  bad(ly), intense/medium, impact/contact Y... 2012.04.06
560Simple viewa/an/the/every/one/that/those,          flea market, Niagara/commencement,           supercalifragilisticexpialidocious Y... 2012.03.20
559Simple viewsimilarity between English & Korean/Seoul articulations (articulation of /abD or /abThr),         Nestorius & Prester John Y... 2012.03.11
558Simple viewlb/eg/etc.     Spanish/Basque/Catalan/~     Korean's,  'of ^Korean^ culture'     'head/tail consonants'    'worm moon' Y... 2012.03.08
557Simple viewSenkaku せんか Islands, 釣魚台群島,       Hokkaido/Ainu, Sakhalin/Сахалин,       Liancourt Rocks 독도,  Tsushima Y... 2012.03.06
556Simple view釣魚台群島/尖閣諸島, 琉球諸島, 南西諸島, 薩南諸島, 吐噶喇列島, 沖縄諸島, 慶良間諸島, 先島諸島, 宮古列島, 八重山諸島 Y... 2013.05.05
555Simple view Socotra Rock 이어도,      Falklands,       Paracel Islands,       Spratly Islands,     Yonaguni 與那國,     Hans Island Y... 2012.04.20
554Simple viewslave/Slav,    'Black History Month'    bidet/shampoo/doomsday,   'six pack abs'    birdie/par,     Sparta/Athens Y... 2012.02.18
553Now readingavenge, scold, anxious, 'auxiliary verb', off, ugly/clever, absolute (term), like, run, able, hardly,           M&M Y... 2012.02.13
552Simple viewacquiesce, check, get, numb, coward, amount, principal, couple, husband, pair, set,  (ad)dress,  'call oneself' Y... 2012.02.13
551Simple viewfounder/flounder, author, passed/past, permit (of), way(s), ticket, race, series, (a)wake(n), mean(s), comprise Y... 2012.02.13
550Simple viewbug, contrast, vulgar, distinct(ive), crucial, contrast,  practicable/practical,  alternative/alternate, role, need Y... 2012.02.13
549Simple view'ui=*a/Λ/o'  act(ion), credentialed, best, spree, plane, number, 'look to', ilk, chagrin, senior/downsize, hassle Y... 2012.02.13
548Simple view>> Corrected                                  "verb /C1 & /S" Y... 2012.04.06
547Simple view       +'Phonetic study  on  English  nouns'        < Lingering of articles >        'definite/indefinite article' Y... 2012.02.13
546Simple view>>         'English  verb/adjective/adverb'     (derived nouns)               < have / be as v.aux. > Y... 2012.02.13
545Simple view             Mr.   Mrs.   씨,   さん,   氏              English/Korean/Japanese/Chinese  honorifics Y... 2012.02.13
544Simple view'Lost Generation',         'black hole'           Pearl S. Buck,          ** Beethoven **         <periodic table> Y... 2011.12.09
543Simple viewThomas Mann,   Ernest Hemingway,   Winston Churchill,   Rabindranath Tagore,    *Albert Einstein*   川端 康成 Y... 2011.11.25
542Simple view   Jane Austen,   Franz Kafka,   Virginia Woolf,   James Joyce,   Ezra Pound,   Gustave Flaubert,   George Sand Y... 2011.11.21
541Simple viewnickname,  'slave states'   'Roman numeral'    Conan Doyle,   Charles Baudelaire,   Mark Twain,    Helen Keller Y... 2011.11.21
540Simple viewIndian/Interlingua,     Leyzer Zamenhof,   'a pair of scissors',     Benjamin Franklin,    Poe/Yeats,   H. G. Wells Y... 2011.11.09
539Simple view'Occupy Wall -'    adjectives;    'US' Presidents'  Lincoln/Washington/Jefferson,   'Declaration of Independence' Y... 2011.11.02
538Simple view    Herman Melville,  G. A. Henty,  Oliver Wendell Holmes,  John Greenleaf Whittier,    James Russell Lowell Y... 2011.10.28
537Simple viewJoseph Conrad,  Lawrence/Hogarth,  Flinders Petrie,  Amelia Edwards,  Gaston Maspero,  Nathaniel Hawthorne Y... 2011.10.21
536Simple view    George Bernard Shaw,        William Archer,  Alfred Sutro,  Maurice Maeterlinck,  Henrik Ibsen,   Maupassant Y... 2011.10.15
535Simple viewBalzac,  Charles Dickens,    Leo Tolstoy,  Fyodor Dostoevsky,   Pushkin/Gogol/Gorky/Turgenev,  Anton Chekhov Y... 2011.10.12
534Simple viewJohn Dryden,  Jonathan Swift,  Alexander Pope,  William Cowper,  John Fletcher,       Walter Scott,     Stendhal Y... 2011.10.05
533Simple viewPliny the Younger,  Petronius, Tacitus,     Martial,  Silius Italicus, Quintilian,     Seneca,   William Lisle Bowles Y... 2011.09.29
532Simple viewSamuel Taylor Coleridge,  William Wordsworth,  Emerson,    Virgil/Ovid/Horace/Statius,   Suetonius,  Juvenal Y... 2011.09.26
531Simple viewAugust Bebel,  Herbert Spencer,            Charles Darwin,        Jean-Baptiste Lamarck,     Thomas Henry Huxley Y... 2011.09.23
530Simple viewEdmund Spenser, Franz Liszt,  Victor Hugo, Alphonse de Lamartine, Heinrich Heine,  Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels Y... 2011.09.17
529Simple viewLilly/Tasso, James Henry Leigh Hunt, Samuel Daniel, Martha Foote Crow, Claudio Monteverdi,  Richard Wagner Y... 2011.09.04
528Simple viewRobert Herrick, Samuel Pepys, William Caxton, Henry B. Wheatley, Swinburne, Christina Rossetti,   Vampyre Y... 2011.09.01
527Simple viewHeinrich Bullinger,  Johannes Brenz,  Georg Joachim Rheticus,  Philipp Melanchthon,  William Alabaster Y... 2011.09.01
526Simple viewPetrus Ramus,  Theodore Beza,  Philip Schaff,  Joachim Westphal,  François Hotman,  'The Right to Heresy' Y... 2011.08.07
525Simple viewAdam Smith,  Cassius Dio,    Stephanus,  William Smith,  Pausanias,  Marcus Aurelius, Diogenes Laërtius Y... 2011.08.03
524Simple view>> Corrected                                <Moralia> Y... 2011.08.31
523Simple viewTorricelli, Bernoulli, 'Jean le Rond d'Alembert', Diderot, 'Ephraim Chambers', 'Pierre Bayle', 'Laurence Sterne' Y... 2011.07.26
522Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
521Simple viewHero/Vitruvius Apollonius/Diophantus/Theon,       d'Aguilon, 'John Aubrey', 'François Viète', Oughtred/Pascal Y... 2011.07.21
520Simple viewCusa/Nunes/Vesalius/Borelli, 'de Vere', Stanley,  Vinci/Michelangelo/Raphael, 'Luca Pacioli',   Vasari/Alberti Y... 2011.07.12
519Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.24
518Simple viewGuicciardini, 'Pico della Mirandola', Frisius*, Nostradamus, 'Sir Philip Sidney', Milton/Chaucer/Boiardo/Cardano Y... 2011.07.05
517Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
516Simple viewShelley/Keats/Byron/Castelli/Orta/Wycliffe/Huss,  'Mary Sidney',  Baïf/Montaigne/Buchanan, 'Marie de Gournay' Y... 2011.07.01
515Simple view>> Corrected                                <Iliad> Y... 2011.08.19
514Simple viewMarlowe/Nashe/Chapman, 'Ben Jonson', 'Beaumont & Fletcher', Marston/Fleay/Glapthorne/Warburton/Brome Y... 2011.06.24
513Simple viewVarro/Catullus/Livy/Sallust,   Ovid/Apuleius/Horace/Lucretius,      Calvin/Servetus/Zwingli/Cranmer/Luther Y... 2011.06.19
512Simple viewSavonarola/Colet/Erasmus/Loyola/Ficino/Mirandola/Gracián/Swedenborg/Ockham/Abelard,    Latin,   'Lex Talio' Y... 2011.06.12
511Simple viewTerence/Menippus/Arcesilaus/Theophras-,  Voltaire/Maupertuis/Schiller/Winckelmann/Rochefoucauld/Cervantes Y... 2011.06.07
510Simple viewBoccaccio/Petrarch/Helvétius/Cesare/Malthus,  Say/Gresham,  Machiavelli/Telesio/Boyle/Bacon/Kepler/Brahe Y... 2011.06.04
509Simple viewHerder/Sanai/Hafez,  Dante, 'Adam Smith', 'Richard Cantillon', 'Henry More', ''Isaac Newton', Ricardo/Bentham Y... 2011.06.01
508Simple viewBerkeley, 'Giordano Bruno', Spinoza/Rousseau/Fichte/Hölderlin/Schelling, 'Jakob Böhme', Hamann/Goethe/Vigo Y... 2011.05.29
507Simple view'Thomas Hobbes' 'John Stuart Mill' 'Arthur Schopenhauer' 'Friedrich Nietzsche' Hegel/Kant/Hume/Locke/Leibniz Y... 2011.05.26
506Simple viewGalileo/Orpheus/Argonautica/Strabo,    'Augustine of Hippo', Neoplatonism/Enneads/Cicero/Anselm/Descartes Y... 2011.05.24
505Simple view                              "English    spelling/vocabulary"                   (Korean connection) Y... 2011.05.19
504Simple viewPyrrho/Galen/Avicenna/Averroes/Maimonides, 'Albertus Magnus', 'Thomas Aquinas', 'Duns Scotus', Copernicus Y... 2011.05.17
503Simple viewArchimedes/Aspasia/Euclid/Hipparchus/Hippocrates/Leonidas/Pericles/Ptolemy/Solon/Themistocles/Epicurus Y... 2011.05.14
502Simple view             Phonetic study    on   German/French   words/sentences Y... 2011.05.13
501Simple view'Milesian school'  'Seven Wonders'  Eleatics/sophism/pluralist/Cynics/Stoic/Montesquieu/Suda/eureka/Vitruvius Y... 2011.05.11
500Simple viewAeschylus/Aesop/Euripides/Hesiod,   Homer/Lucian/Menander/Pindar,  Polybius/Sappho/Sophocles, Alcibiades Y... 2011.05.11
499Simple viewThales/Anaximander/Anaximenes/Pythagoras,  Anaxagoras/Empedocles,  Antisthenes/Diogenes/Crates/Zeno Y... 2011.05.07
498Simple view'geologic era'  'Stone Age'   Yahoo/Google   'Know yourself'   introspection   'Seven Sages'   'material monism' Y... 2011.05.05
497Simple viewSocrates/Thucydides/Plutarch/Herodotus/Xenophon/Aristophanes/Plato/Aristotle/Parmenides/Democritus, etc. Y... 2011.05.04
496Simple view                           phonetic analysis on     Buddha  &  Buddhism Y... 2011.05.04
495Simple viewPhonetic analysis on   Hinduism/Veda/Sanskrit/Prakrit/Zoroaster, Manichaeism/Mani,  Bahá'í Faith, Bahá'u'lláh Y... 2011.04.29
494Simple view'net-cutting'  'country music'  'General Zod'      BC/AD  'Independence day'     BCE/CE    '(Before) Common Era' Y... 2011.04.14
493Simple view    'phonetic study on Jesus Christ  &  Moshe'             'Twelve Apostles'              'Hellenistic civilization??' Y... 2011.04.10
492Simple view           translation :           논어(論語)/공자(孔子/Confucius),               etymological analysis Y... 2011.04.08
491Simple view'論語/논어 [non  ŋΛ]  &  Old Testament'       Torah/Pentateuch         'Why Torah, Prophets, Writings, 四書五經' Y... 2011.04.05
490Simple view'lady-in-waiting'  Confucius/Mencius/Laozi/Micius  popcorn  'Generation Y/X'  'Wonder Woman'       I/you    etc. Y... 2011.04.02
489Simple viewfraction/ordinal,   'national flowers'   'Department of State'    'God bless you!'   'daylight saving time'   *BC/AD Y... 2011.03.20
488Simple view"&/and",                  italic,  ride/drive,       Morrison, Messiah/Immanuel,  succeed,     'Virgin Mary'  Joseph Y... 2011.03.15
487Simple view‘Moby-Dick’     'Coca Cola'       pronouns/4,  'Chinese carry-out'     'days of months'     'leap year (day)'   date Y... 2011.03.04
486Simple view'The Star-Spangled Banner'   &   'God Save the Queen'   &    'Land of Hope and Glory';        national anthems Y... 2011.02.10
485Simple view         'La Marseillaise'              Deutschlandlied              'National anthem of Austria' Y... 2013.05.12
484Simple view'Ask not'/America       months  'days of the week'  day/week/month/year  '(the) first'  hamburger  'Super Bowl' Y... 2011.02.09
483Simple view'passive voice'               'shoe-string budget?'  'you know'  'by the way'  'eh/well'  'blood libel'    'last supper' Y... 2011.01.14
482Simple view'Do I know you?'           'Season's Greetings'  'Auld Lang Syne'      'Christian cross,  resurrection'    'Red Cross' Y... 2011.01.08
481Simple view'Moses & Jesus Christ'            Christ/Jesus,   'Christmas card'   'Why Santa is old man'   MoU,      'Three Magi' Y... 2010.12.25
480Simple view"Shakespeare   &  Plutarch"                  'Sir Thomas More'   'G6'     oneself/myself/ourselves/etc.    ID Y... 2010.12.23
479Simple view'Why wedding dresses are white'              Halloween/제사,  denim, angel(s), eve, Ivy/steak, 'Rhode Island' Y... 2010.12.19
478Simple viewThanksgiving-day,         SantaClaus,           countries,      "silent letter??"     waffle/빈대떡/cupcake Y... 2010.11.26
477Simple view>> More considerations on  "silent letter??";     between GRECOnglish & orthodox English pronunciations Y... 2010.11.27
476Simple view"for the people, by the people, of the people"                          "I have a dream"      yes/no Y... 2010.10.10
475Simple view'it :  imp. v.??'              methinks                               Memorial/Mother's Day,    'hat trick'  franchise/may Y... 2010.06.05
474Simple view"Phonetics/linguistics  &  Bible"                                            "dirty Chinese??" Y... 2010.04.20
473Simple view'aui*Λ/o/='        exigency, need/longing, matter, pressure/force, hurry/rush, weight/postulate/concept/picture Y... 2010.04.05
472Simple view>> Corrected:                   [auiΛ]/S/mES, /S/MS;    [auio]/S/mES, /T/mES, /C1/mES;   [aui=]/P/pES Y... 2010.08.14
471Simple viewview/viewpoint, scheme/surmise/lack/economy/feature,  detail/topic,  item/issue,  point/case,  trifle/matter Y... 2010.04.05
470Simple viewaffair/terrific,  spooky/spook, dreadful/fearsome/awesome/traditional,  customary/familiar,  normal/average Y... 2010.04.05
469Simple viewusual/general,  common/routine, standard, apropos, related/relati-,  germane/cognate, tempor-, fly-by-night Y... 2010.04.05
468Simple viewpassing,  fugitive, 'short-lived', transient/ably/momentarily/amplify/stretch,  expand/wax,  augment/raise Y... 2010.04.05
467Simple viewheighten/lengthen,  embarra-/discountena-,  'show up', offend,  chagrin/vex, mortify/abash,  incarna-/personi- Y... 2010.04.05
466Simple viewrepresent/depict,  illustrate/explicate, codify, manifest, rubbish,  malign/libel,  abuse/mar, decry, blacken Y... 2010.04.05
465Simple viewsignificance/fervour/ebullience,  weight/emphasis, distillation/water/dew/perspiration/moisture/spray/bigotry Y... 2010.04.05
464Simple viewchutzpah', fight, payoff, path,  consequences/end, result(s), verdict,  upshot/event, compatible, consonant Y... 2010.04.05
463Simple viewsociable, convivial,  'dyed in the wool', universal, overall,  total/downright, worldwide,  'far-flung', entire Y... 2010.04.05
462Simple viewwhole/patient,  mild/equab-, kind/generali-/interpola-,  sophisticate/pervert, counsel/instruct,  refine/temper Y... 2010.04.05
461Simple viewhype/razzmatazz, razzle-dazzle, spotlight, play-up, write-up,  champion/uphold, develop,  defend, 'plead for' Y... 2010.04.05
460Simple viewhelp,  advocate/recommend,  puzzle/poser, problem, inconsistency, 'closed book', conundrum, fabrication Y... 2010.04.05
459Simple viewforgery/phony, lie(s), fiction, myth,  fake/counterfeit,  takings, arrest/bust,  catching/espial, trappings/bard Y... 2010.04.05
458Simple viewimprisonment/detenti-, seizure,  dignity, 'self-importa-', decorum/etiquet-,  grandeur/prominen-, proprieties Y... 2010.04.05
457Simple viewsolemnities/gravity,  majesties, 'His Honour, etc.',  destitute, 'down and out',  poor, 'bad(ly) off', 'well-off' Y... 2010.04.05
456Simple viewneedy,  short/low, jovial,  lively, 'full of beans', congenial/ratty/peevish,  sour/tart,  surly/churlish, peppery Y... 2010.04.05
455Simple viewtesty/heady/snappish, unlimited/incomparable/peremptory/complain,  grumble/bellyache, carp/kvetch, groan Y... 2010.04.05
454Simple viewwail/soothe,  'relieve (yourself)', soften/mitigate/scold/blame,  correct/chasten, discipline/censure/advertise Y... 2010.04.05
453Simple viewfortis(?) consonants,                                    Short(?) Program,  Democrat/donkey,  Valentine's Day Y... 2010.02.24
452Simple view>>                                              θ/ð/v/f Y... 2014.03.09
451Simple viewDifference between English & GRECOnglish/GC,                                             pronouns,   'Excuse me.' Y... 2010.01.23
450Simple view'Λui*a/o/=', business/craft, work/occupation, call/job, line/field, condition/symptoms/disorder/appointments Y... 2010.01.06
449Simple view>> Corrections:                                               [Λuia] adjective,       [Λui=] /S/SS Y... 2010.09.18
448Simple viewhorseback-riding?    class, label, creature, gull,   figure/dupe, fitting/fit,    worthy/praiseworthy/worthwhile Y... 2010.01.06
447Simple viewcorrect,  toxic/unhealthful,  deadly/destructive, mortal/killing, choice/prime,  'cool, first-class', select/rare Y... 2010.01.06
446Simple viewbrilliant/marvello-, cracking/mega, coolish/aggregate/assemble/accumula-, test/challenge, look at, research Y... 2010.01.06
445Simple viewexaggerate/emphasise/enlarge/inflate/embroider, frighten/scare/stun/alarm, damp/humidness/opacity/dim Y... 2010.01.06
444Simple viewfaintness/funniness/sport/pleasure/cheerfulness/joy,   understanding/affectionateness/toleration/surd/hard Y... 2010.01.06
443Simple viewdire/awful/dreadful/notable, non-specialist, general/easy/simple/plain/significant/suppose/imagine, believe in Y... 2010.01.06
442Simple view'fancy up', feed, 'eat up', graze/pasture/browse,  'dine out', copulate/shag/bonk,  'have a ball', 'have a fuck' Y... 2010.01.06
441Simple view'have a hump', erase, 'cancel out', excise, 'wipe out', luxury/extra/art/pleasure/love/density/want/parsimony Y... 2010.01.06
440Simple viewdimension/solidity/impenetrability/terror/animosity/dread/horror/fright/awe/deadline,    value/unchangeability Y... 2010.01.06
439Simple viewconstancy,  merit/irreversibility,  quality/unalterability,  caliber/invariability, bad,  kind/humane, good, favour Y... 2010.01.06
438Simple viewcaring/sharp/risky/parlous/ominous/dicey/insecure/ugly/quiescent/yielding/soft/dutiful/willing, patient/serene Y... 2010.01.06
437Simple viewliberal/prodigal, lax/permissive/tender, constancy/stability, lenient/magnanimo-/free/evolve, generate/render Y... 2010.01.06
436Simple viewguarantee/guaranty, delegate/authorize, trust, transfer/transport, hand/give/pass/capture, charm/bewitch Y... 2010.01.06
435Simple viewattract/fascinate,  entrance/trance,  submit/yield/agree/bend/bow/ailment, malaise/instrument/tool/apropos Y... 2010.01.06
434Simple viewtimely/genuine/lethal/terminal/hostile/fine/willing/affable/commix/terrorize/water, kindliness, hand-out Y... 2010.01.06
433Simple viewEnglish/GRECOnglish accent,                   'Happy Holidays',  season, chemistry?         'primary consonants' Y... 2010.01.04
432Simple view'uia*Λ/o/='            mix/mixture;     blend;     compound/composite/composition;     amalgam/amalgamation Y... 2010.01.04
431Simple view>> Corrected:                                             [uia=] /T/MS, /P/mES Y... 2010.08.13
430Simple viewcoalescence; climax; venture; project; risk; scheme;  benefit/beneficiality;  good(ness);  use; gain; reward Y... 2009.12.25
429Simple viewboon; alert; serious; deep; intellectual; scholarly; fit;    appropriate/expropriate; irregular;    asymmetric(al) Y... 2009.12.01
428Simple viewfraternize; socialize; sacrifice; abandon; renounce; forfeit(ure); jilt; disentangle/untangle; generalize (-ise) Y... 2009.12.01
427Simple viewextrapolate; infer; conclude; 'reason out'; universalize; mind; sense; knowledge; wit; corruption/corruptne- Y... 2009.12.01
426Simple view>> Corrections:          mindfulness/mind, sensuousness/sense, wiseness/wisdom, judiciousness/judgement Y... 2009.12.21
425Simple viewgraft; danger(ousness); chance; prospect; optimality/optimization; gawky/gauche; heavy; earnest; true/H?  Y... 2009.12.01
424Simple viewphysical; manual; base; sanguine; expectant; budget; allowance; finance(s); shove; thrust; nudge; knock Y... 2009.12.01
423Simple viewpush; bump; cause; source; spring; agent; opposite; different; enough/enow; lavish; belligerent; conflicting Y... 2009.12.01
422Simple viewoptimize; behave;   act/react; conduct(ion); acquit ; comport; deliberate; consider; think; ponder; debate Y... 2009.12.01
421Simple viewfrighten; scare; petrify;    interweave; intermingle; commingle; alleviate;    trivialize; untangle; shadiness Y... 2009.12.01
420Simple viewrun;   disclose; divulge; evince; defraud; hoodwink;   impart; promulgate; deteriorate; fundi; wonk;   study Y... 2009.12.01
419Simple view"trick or treat"                                   "air force one" Y... 2009.11.06
418Simple view*  'iau*Λ/o/='      mean(s), aid, advantage, vacuum,    (expressive) style, competition, aggression, intrusion Y... 2009.11.04
417Simple view>> Corrected:              [iauΛ] /P/MS, /S/aES, /C1/SS, /P/mES,   [iauo] /C2/MS, /verb,   [iau=] /P/mES Y... 2010.10.05
416Simple view'ill will',    pugnacity/roundabout/wandering, straightforward/natural/frank/dirty/blue, lavish/full/grace/raise Y... 2009.11.04
415Simple viewadvance/boycott/snub, refrain from, stay away -, spurn, throw out, eject/support/bear, hold up, carry/prop Y... 2009.11.03
414Simple viewfame/honour/glory, trouble(someness), inconvenience/solemness/gravity, earnest(ness), soberness/feeling Y... 2009.11.03
413Simple viewsubmission,   philanthropic(al), gracious, almsgiving, positive, confident, hopeful, upbeat,   real(ly), absolute Y... 2009.11.03
412Simple viewperfect/right/complete/shoot/speed/race/rush/tear/dash/pose/present/create/rise,     lead (to),  result (in) Y... 2009.11.03
411Simple viewsave, rescue, recover, salvage,    bail (out), chafe, rub, scratch, rasp, scrape,    foolish(ness), judg(e)ment Y... 2009.11.03
410Simple viewgrotesquery/unpleasingness/verity,   'true fact?' reality, sensuous/sensual, provocative/delicious/delectable Y... 2009.11.03
409Simple viewsteady/beautiful/scenic, savo(u)ry, federate/merge,   unify/unite, consolidate/mingle/coalesce/save/reserve Y... 2009.11.03
408Simple viewstore/collect/vaporize/gasify/aerate,     sublimate/sublime, transpire/hesitate/waver/delay/pause/wait/falter Y... 2009.11.03
407Simple view'compound noun'                Go go go!   White House, northwest, used car,   African-American,   ball games Y... 2009.10.20
406Simple viewdefault [*]/[h]/[=]                   nightline, below, having,  'So many people, so many minds.'  'Mother’s Day' Y... 2009.10.16
405Simple viewMrs./Miss/Ms./lady,                   principle of (sur)names,                   Kor-/Eng- sentences              color Y... 2009.10.11
404Simple view'=ia*Λ/o/u'         agent/H? height/representative/minister/agent/deputy/summit/peak, fund(s), mutual/trust Y... 2009.10.04
403Simple view>> Corrections:                   [=iaΛ] /S/mES,   [=iau]/P/noun, /C1/mES,    [=iao]/S/aES,   /P/T/C1/mES,  Y... 2010.08.28
402Simple viewtherapeutic,  lavish/healing/restorative, good(s), corrective/temporary/acting/interim,  strain/stress/strenu- Y... 2009.10.04
401Simple view'stand-in',   'fill-in',   farming, country, rural, rustic, agrarian,   complain, moan, bitch, whine, growl, gripe Y... 2009.10.04
400Simple viewsophisticate/school/train/educate/consecrate,  bless/H? monitor,  'check (out)', program(me), info(rmation) Y... 2009.10.04
399Simple view>> Corrections:                                           "45. monitor"     &     "46.  check (out)" Y... 2009.11.27
398Simple viewproof, submission, reverence, observance, density, compact(ed)ness, impenetrability, thick, close, heavy Y... 2009.10.04
397Simple viewsolid, substantial, defenc(s)e, rash, irresponsible, precipitate, prove, support, bear, shoulder, endure, keep Y... 2009.10.04
396Simple viewoscillate/fluctuate/swing/vary/sway/veer, effects, end, results, wake/morosity/gloom, mood(in-), sulk(in-) Y... 2009.10.04
395Simple viewsour(ness), vice/viciousness, cruelty, savage(ry), feminine(ness), sex, female(n-), male(n-), masculine(n-) Y... 2009.10.04
394Simple viewterrific, bodacious(ly), boff(o), 'jim-dandy', hopeful, positive, confident, 'can-do', formal(ly), official, regular Y... 2009.10.04
393Simple viewparlous/perilous, '(de)fend (off)',  'cover up', protect/guard/secure/preserve/furnish,  'fit out', stock/supply Y... 2009.10.04
392Simple viewprovision/provide/serialize, 'set up', arrange/form/order/sort/sicken/disgust/revolt, repel/repulse, 'gross out' Y... 2009.10.04
391Simple view>> Corrections:                                              "set up"          (set) Y... 2010.01.18
390Simple view'Why not Gibson Charles?'          'Mr. Gibson' or 'Gibson mister'        'Your Honour'        'English middle name' Y... 2009.09.19
389Simple view'ia=*Λ/o/u'         supplement,      quest,     philanthropic(al), irritative, humanitarian, affronted, sacrifice Y... 2009.09.15
388Simple view>> Corrected Y... 2010.11.20
387Simple viewabandon(ment), focus, center, finish, do, use, '(be) used to', effect, merit, culture, public, spell/charm/lure Y... 2009.09.15
386Simple viewfair(ness), love(liness), neighbo(u)rly, siz(e)ably, wil(l)fully, corpor(e)al, cordial, futile, troubledly, disturbing Y... 2009.09.15
385Simple viewwildish, wild(ly),   loud(ly), cut, sever, divide,   rend, schism,   separate, cast, throw, project, launch, pitch Y... 2009.09.15
384Simple viewshed, consolidate, combine, unite, join,  marry, amalgamate, boundary, limits, obscurity, negligence/neglect Y... 2009.09.15
383Simple viewirresponsibleness, uncertainty, changeability, rough, crude/petro-, homespun, rough-hew(n), 'stylish person' Y... 2009.09.15
382Simple view'in/on demand'  show, express, display, reveal, register, rouse, cause, fire, prompt, ease, moderate, animate Y... 2009.09.15
381Simple viewgrafting;                  greeting;                 "good-bye"                   "forbidden fruit" Y... 2009.09.11
380Simple viewno/though/yes,         (nein/doch/ja)                    "You like it, do you? ΛV" Y... 2009.09.08
379Simple view>> "Don't you like it?"           "The life must go on."           sniper,          Phoenicia,         freemason Y... 2009.09.18
378Simple view'iaΛ*o/u/='   factor, fundament(al), problematic(al),  '(dangling) participle', loose(ly),  'blue chip', large-sized Y... 2009.09.04
377Simple viewpunctuality, promptness, read(il)y, regular(ity), stead(il)y, consistent(ly),  'Kindly yours',  '(double) genitive' Y... 2009.09.04
376Simple viewsimplicity/easiness/clarity, logic(ality), urgency/importan-, need(fulness), gravity, press(ure), hurry/querulo- Y... 2009.09.04
375Simple viewbad-tempered,     hot-tempered, irascible,    'provide (against/for)', 'fit (in)', 'spy (on)',  follow/i? monitor/H? Y... 2009.09.04
374Simple viewagree/-/i? thunder(bolt), cheat(er), sharper,  'confidence man', pledge/v? committal, promise/v? segmented Y... 2009.09.04
373Simple viewsegregative/augmentative/increasable/protractive/celebrative,  'deal in/with', 'trade in', 'build up', scare/-/i? Y... 2009.09.04
372Simple view'iao*Λ/u/='      position/H?   exposé,      (have) impact/contact/curb/date/elbow/interview/panic/park/verb? Y... 2009.08.26
371Simple view>> Corrected:                                       [iaou] /S/aES Y... 2010.07.09
370Simple viewcare(fulness),  worry/v?   'seeing eye', old/H? passé, circumspect(ive),    'Indian summer',  oldish, enervate Y... 2009.08.26
369Simple viewverity, truth,  'the true',  factuality, tru(thful)ly,     'Sincerely yours', media blitz, clear/whole/H? wholeness Y... 2009.08.26
368Simple viewunity/cohesion, barrenness, aridness/poorer/unproductivity, technological), propitiatory/atonable/reparative Y... 2009.08.26
367Simple viewoblatory, mockable, mock(up), ironic/sneerful/aggravative, exaggeratively, heightened, join/H? 'wrap (up)' Y... 2009.08.26
366Simple view* 'oia*Λ/u/='  'the more - of',      'holy grail', 'more important(ly)', '(the) more universal',      'bachelor party' Y... 2009.08.21
365Simple view>> Corrected :                                      [oiau]/P/MS/noun,  /mES/verb Y... 2010.09.13
364Simple view'Please be seated',  humidness, damp(ness), moistness, bounty,      plenty, profusion, limit(ation), ultimacy Y... 2009.08.21
363Simple viewbest/highest/finest/choicest, 'succumb to', 'catch in', 'contract of', impermanency/transiency/insecureness Y... 2009.08.21
362Simple view>> Corrected:                               "23.  catch (in)" Y... 2010.09.13
361Simple viewcapableness/means/competency/potency/captainship, complete/H? done, sacred/H? blessed, recap(itulate) Y... 2009.08.21
360Simple view'uai*Λ/o/='       periodic(al),  cyclic(al),  great(ly),    fade (away),  melt (away),    principle(s),  scruple(s) Y... 2009.08.15
359Simple view>> Corrected :                  [uaio]   from /C1/mES,  “recreate”/+-,    (14.     deleted) Y... 2010.04.11
358Simple viewgloom(ine-), disabled/handicapped, deceptively, copy(write), xerox, safety/safene-, (im)pass(e), im/explicit Y... 2009.08.15
357Simple viewsanctimonious(ly), religiose, disorder(ed)ly, straightforward(ly),   over/underestimate,  miss (out),  way(s) Y... 2009.08.15
356Simple view'aiu*Λ/o/='       hope(fulness),     long(ing),     answerableness,   opportuneness,   benevolent,   over/end Y... 2009.08.11
355Simple view>> Corrected:                                        [aiu=] /P/pES,  /T/pES Y... 2010.10.13
354Simple viewconventional,   davenport,  secretaire,       'government(s); collective n.?'       authorities,   viable/possible Y... 2009.08.10
353Simple viewstereotypic(al), baseball, empty/H? beating,  danger(ousness), clear/H? fine/H?   'intens(iv)e, intent',   past Y... 2009.08.10
352Simple viewwhat/which//that/this/whatever/whose/who/however, although, but, except(ing), and, It is me, both/with Y... 2009.08.07
351Simple view'=ai*Λ/o/u'     porn(o), revelant, continue,  keep(ing-up), maintain,  carry(ing-on), lasting(ness), curiosity Y... 2009.07.31
350Simple viewalienism, exot(ci)sm, revenge, extant, actual(ly), ugly, surly,  current/heart/Hist?  headquarter(s), bake(ry) Y... 2009.07.31
349Simple viewwork(place), observation/concurrency/conformity, fanatic(al), deadly/noticeableness/appearan-/visiblene- Y... 2009.07.31
348Simple viewdouble(ness), fellow,  submission(s),  concentrative(ly),  husband/H?  advance(ment),  purport,  claim/H? Y... 2009.07.31
347Simple viewModifications & Corrections:            'ai=*Λ/o/u' ,      difficultness  >>  difficulty          [ai=u] Y... 2009.09.16
346Simple viewboundary, confine(s), verge(s),   corporate culture, custom(s),    lifestyle,  art(s)y–craft(s)y,    one,    half Y... 2009.07.26
345Simple view(one and) only,   only,   not,  'not only ~ but'   'not-balance',  individual(s),  impeach/formidability/difficulty Y... 2009.07.26
344Simple view>> Corrections:                                 28. difficultness/difficulty Y... 2009.09.16
343Simple viewoffense, Abo,  identify with, politic(al)ly,    n/m dash,   scoot, seeing as (how), 'waste/fade/wither (away)' Y... 2009.07.26
342Simple viewFrench Kiss,   French fry,   French Connection,   French leave,   French maid,   French-German enmity,  - Y... 2009.07.21
341Simple view'Λai*o/u/='     corpor(e)ality, Tombstone,    'more higher',   'might could',   'three mile',  'VAT tax', four-foot Y... 2009.07.17
340Simple view>> Corrected:                                                 [Λai=]/T/MS Y... 2010.09.22
339Simple view'rarely ever',  'couldn't hardly', hard(ly), anticipate/empathy, IOU, insure/complacency, absolute(ness), mum Y... 2009.07.17
338Simple viewunchangeablene-/invariablene-/inalterability/feasibili-/survivab-, grow/vt?  workablene-/corrupti-/viciousne- Y... 2009.07.17
337Simple viewperversion, conscious(ness), consc(ient)ious,    'aware of'   'responsive to'   'cognizant of'   'percipient of' Y... 2009.07.17
336Simple viewtry-to,  solid(ity), substantialness/tangibility/physicality/legitimation, credibleness, greenish, denote, Andy Y... 2009.07.17
335Simple view'aiΛ*o/u/='   impulsivity, impetuosity, anxious/eager?, chat(ter), chiefly/centrally, uppermost/foremost/adv? Y... 2009.07.10
334Simple viewstrangle/worrying(ly),  (ad)judge, recap(itulate), (a)bate,  council/counselor,  gown/univ, (ad)dress,  habit Y... 2009.07.10
333Simple viewstreng(k)th, on purpose, aggravate/tease, broad(ly), wide(ly), quiet(ness/ly), on the quiet, alone, sat/-ing? Y... 2009.07.10
332Simple viewforward(s/ly), further(most), favor/v.i?, foster(ing/ed), caution(ary), heed(fulness), (ad)venture, bold(ness) Y... 2009.07.10
331Simple viewpowerful(ly), power(ful), aloud, roaring(ly),     French kiss,    jazz,   'compare with/to', contrast/n?, born(e) Y... 2009.07.10
330Simple view'aio*Λ/u/='   Your-Honour,       Stonehenge,      eas(il)y/2,   safety,  obsession,    Big Apple (NY),  moniker Y... 2009.07.03
329Simple viewitem/also,  fundament(al),         neighbor,        decisive, hard-hitting,    upright(ly), sheer(ly),         need Y... 2009.07.03
328Simple view'oai*Λ/u/='    excess, inordinacy, immoderacy, extravagancy, whitish, light(ly), soft(ly), almight(il)y, (re)lax Y... 2009.06.26
327Simple view>> Corrections:                               [oaiu]            swanky Y... 2010.03.22
326Simple viewdoll, immigrate, remove/v.i.?  'permit of', sanction, sit/set, lemon,    'spelling bee',    'rote learning', 'look to' Y... 2009.06.26
325Simple viewboast/form, bragging(ly), in vain,  lordly/adv?  egotistic(al), a thought, sequent(ial), economic(al), punitory Y... 2009.06.26
324Simple view>> Corrections:                                        26. lordly Y... 2010.03.22
323Simple viewretaliative, bright(ly), historic(al), oblig(at)e, (t)here, this/that,   voiced/voiceless,   like-to, like, 'like(d) to' Y... 2009.06.26
322Simple view'iΛo*a/u/='    gender role, battle with,  media/data/agenda/dirtily/pathetic(al), fair(ly), comply with, evade Y... 2009.06.20
321Simple viewboxwood/parts/quantity, a quantity of, an amount of, a lot, partially/various/more-important(ly), disorderly Y... 2009.06.20
320Simple viewhigh(ly), bull/bear, corporal/comic(al), panicky/hysteric/fleshy/awful(ly), hysteric, /slash, dare, honey/baby Y... 2009.06.19
319Simple view'oiΛ*a/u/='     obsolescent,  big(ly),   'do ~ have or have ~ got?'  'know about'  defense,   '(not) care less' Y... 2009.06.15
318Simple view'best foot' ugly/clever, plain(ly), banal, dullish, 'girl or woman?'  '-person', man/male,  '-ess' mistress/madam Y... 2009.06.15
317Simple view'iΛa*o/u/='    acknowledgements/sensitive/reasonability/formidable,   once/everyday,   commonly/ordinarily Y... 2009.06.08
316Simple viewroutinely, 'in back of'  back/up, back/v?  capacity,  "first lady"  noblewoman, retaliative, snug(ly), warmish Y... 2009.06.08
315Simple viewelements, near(ly), close(ly), godly,  'free gift?'  free(ly), gam,   'double passive'  abhominable,  likely/liable Y... 2009.06.08
314Simple view'aiΛ*o/u/='    imperative/alleviate, wrought/wreak, nuts,  vs/v,  proceeding(s), formality/solemnities, taunt Y... 2009.06.02
313Simple view>> Corrected:                       [aiΛu] /P/pES/adjectives/adverbs,     [aiΛ=/P,  /MS/noun] 11. solemnities Y... 2010.04.25
312Simple viewcalumny/self-complacently, roughish, effect/affect, marque, P.S. give up, quantity of, roaringly/selectable Y... 2009.06.02
311Simple view'iΛ=*a/o/u'  full(y)/party/complicated/certain  'We sure are'  invaluable/priceless/irrevocability/irreversibility Y... 2009.05.26
310Simple view>> Corrected:                                         complicated/complex Y... 2009.08.28
309Simple viewphilosophic/stoic/cool/factualness/blind/luxuriant/intrinsic/organic/ambiguous,    cell phone,   (to) no end, - Y... 2009.05.26
308Simple view'=iΛ*a/o/u'   beg the question,  plead guilty,   teaser, huff and puff, look at, low(ly),  TV,  agree to,  toast Y... 2009.05.22
307Simple view>> Corrected:                                              [=iΛo]/S/aES Y... 2010.11.13
306Simple viewdeadline,   justly, unique, fairly, hang out,  quarter to,  repulsive/repellant,  ceremonious,  foully, reflect on Y... 2009.05.20
305Simple view'uiΛ*a/o/='  vulnerableness/signiificancy/impotency, soundly, bad(ly), bad/uptight/perchance, chance upon Y... 2009.05.15
304Simple view>> Corrections:                    difficultness  >>   exactingness       [uiΛo] Y... 2009.09.16
303Simple viewheadline,  especially/quieten/empathize/heal, await-for, everywhere, long (for), ill-temper, preside (over), - Y... 2009.05.15
302Simple view<<iΛu*a/o/=>>    medicine/pilot/crowd/feign,     'see television'   'hear radio'      lone(li)ly,  'only terrible' Y... 2009.05.11
301Simple view>> Corrections:                                       "check  >>   check-out" Y... 2009.09.22
300Simple viewdisorder(ed)ly, check(ed),   chess/check,  'part and parcel'  blatant/outright(ly), 'pillow sham' 'of course' Y... 2009.05.11
299Simple view'Λio*a/u/='     (im)possible/answerable/chargeable/TB/utilize,    'incomparable adj. equal'   'center (on)' - Y... 2009.05.04
298Simple view>> Corrected:                                    [Λio=] /P/pES/adjectives Y... 2010.07.05
297Simple view'very best'  estimate, shy/short,  'sort of',  (im)practicable, proportional, wild(ly), waits,  'check out it' - Y... 2009.05.04
296Simple view'oΛi*a/u/='   exceptional/lowly/fantastical/absurd(ness),  sick and tired,  nauseous/fundament(al)/(re)lax Y... 2009.04.27
295Simple view>> Corrections:                                       "check  >>  check-out" Y... 2009.09.22
294Simple viewbasic(ity)/organic(ity)/basically/sick(ly)/ID/good(ness)/why/where/entertainment/awful(ly), loads (of), - Y... 2009.04.27
293Simple view'Λia*o/u/='  follow-up, help, old-salt, sacrosanctity/still(y)/tip/anarchic(al)/exhilarative/capture/casino/- Y... 2009.04.20
292Simple view>> Corrections:   [Λiao]/verb   from /T/mES           &           To: Farlex, Inc. thefreedictionary.com Y... 2009.11.02
291Simple view'aΛi*o/u/='      role, act(ion), pro/professor, older/elderly, suss (out), git/gots, transformation, sociable Y... 2009.04.13
290Simple view>> Corrected:                                [aΛio/P,  noun/MS],   [aΛiu] /P/mES/verb,   [aΛi=]/S/mES Y... 2010.11.09
289Simple viewgroup/warm,  send/idioms,  experiment-with,  sure(ly),  absent, away, gone,  certain, convince, proven Y... 2009.04.13
288Simple view'Λi=*a/o/u'    simple/full/inward/inside/fine/soft   'enough glad' 'beautiful something'   else/tight/just/fair Y... 2009.04.06
287Simple viewstraightforward/stiff/firm  'all but' '- could care less' 'all of a sudden'  specialized/quick/swift/technologic Y... 2009.04.06
286Simple view'=Λi*a/o/u'   comprise/consist, fair(ly), 'fair up/off', 'mild (down)', pretty/very, unawarely, (un)aware-of Y... 2009.03.30
285Simple viewbeware,   'nice of/for ~ to do'   'these/all kind(s) of'   eas(il)y,  friend(li)ly,  route,  suspicious,  light(ly) Y... 2009.03.30
284Simple view'Λiu*a/o/='  want-for, wish, whether/if/that/when, but-what/that, would/should, touching/about, social Y... 2009.03.23